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IRON MOUNTAIN SUPERFUND CLEANUP PLAN AVAILABLE FOR PUBLIC

 SAN FRANCISCO, Feb. 11 /PRNewswire/ -- The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) has announced a proposed plan for reducing the discharge of metal-contaminated waters from the Iron Mountain Mine (IMM) Superfund site. IMM is a 4,400-acre Superfund site located nine miles northwest of Redding, Calif.
 The public is invited to attend a community meeting and provide comments on the proposed plan. The meeting will be held at 7 p.m., Feb. 25, 1993, at the Red Lion Hotel, Sierra Room, 1830 Hilltop Dr., Redding, Calif.
 "U.S. EPA believes this proposed plan is an important element in completing the cleanup of this site," said Jeff Zelikson, director of U.S. EPA's hazardous waste management division. "Iron Mountain Mine is the largest discharger of heavy metals to surface waters in the nation and has a major impact on the valuable Sacramento River fishery and water resources. U.S. EPA will make a final decision after hearing from the public. This comment period allows the community an opportunity to actively participate in the decision-making process."
 U.S. EPA is proposing a cleanup plan that would involve collecting and treating the acid mine drainage discharges from the Old Mine and #8 Mine seep in the Slickrock Creek watershed portion of IMM. The contaminated water would be treated in a proposed enlargement of the lime neutralization plant currently being designed and built to treat drainage from the Lawson and Richmond tunnels. The treated water will be discharged into Boulder Creek and the resulting heavy metal sludge will be deposited in the open pit mine on Iron Mountain.
 The public may also comment on the proposed cleanup plan by submitting written comments, postmarked by March 15, 1993, to:
 Rick Sugarek (H-6-2)
 U.S. EPA, Region 9
 Hazardous Waste Management Division
 75 Hawthorne St.
 San Francisco, CA 94105
 Between the 1860s and 1963, Iron Mountain Mine was periodically mined for iron, silver, gold, copper, zinc and pyrite. Though mining operations were discontinued in 1963, underground mine works, waste rock dumps, piles of ore tailings, and an open mine pit still remain at the site.
 Iron Mountain Mine was placed on U.S. EPA's National Priority List (NPL) in 1983. The NPL is the U.S. EPA's list of hazardous waste sites potentially posing the greatest long-term threat to public health and the environment. U.S. EPA identifies and ranks NPL sites according to threats to nearby populations through actual or potential contamination of groundwater, surface water or air.
 -0- 2/11/93
 /CONTACT: Paula Bruin of the U.S. EPA, 415-744-1587/


CO: U.S. Environamental Protection Agency ST: California IN: MNG SU:

TM -- SF005 -- 5795 02/11/93 14:56 EST
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Date:Feb 11, 1993
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