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INTERNATIONAL COMMUNICATION CONSULTANT SEE GAINS IN PRINT MEDIA INFLUENCE

 INTERNATIONAL COMMUNICATION CONSULTANT SEE GAINS
 IN PRINT MEDIA INFLUENCE
 MONTREAL, Aug. 5 /PRNewswire/ -- Robert L. Dilenschneider, founder and president of a communications consultancy with offices in New York and Chicago and a global client base, told a group of international communicators and educators meeting here that there is a resurgent awareness of the power of print in setting opinion-leader direction.
 Dilenschneider said that "based on talks I have had with some of the best known and most powerful people in business and governments around the world, I see a trend towards sharply focused publications aimed at bigger markets."
 Dilenschneider read the following quote to the assembled group. "Print is the sharpest and strongest weapon of our party...." He then went on to explain that the line came from a speech delivered by Joseph Stalin in 1923. Stalin was wrong only in one aspect, print was the weapon of the free world and, in the end, it was information that toppled communism. Once again proving the power of the printed word.
 Dilenschneider also cited the power of radio, based on its penetration of the marketplace and its cost effectiveness when compared to the expense of television as a viable alternative to video. In his opinion, "the days of narrow niche marketing are nearing and end."
 "America's colleges and universities are not yet preparing public relations students for their career of tomorrow," Dilenschneider told the 1,500 members of the Association for Journalism and Mass Communications gathered in Montreal. He also said "the practicality of corporate governance; what forced Ross Perot out of the presidential race; the new media and more are the things students need to understand today."
 "The ownership of information is a complex economic concept, yet a simple political one; it is the key to power. That is why information persists and information pirates and information sociologist will abound in the Information Age we are entering."
 "In the future," Dilenschneider concluded, "journalists will face some serious questions of conscience because they have become major forces in shaping the opinions of leaders...major forces in what can be called 'the leadership crisis.'"
 -0- 8/5/92
 /CONTACT: Phil Fried of The Dilenschneider Group, 212-922-0900/ CO: Dilenschneider Group ST: New York IN: SU:


LD-SH -- NY071 -- 7248 08/05/92 16:12 EDT
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Date:Aug 5, 1992
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