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INSIDE OUT: Toothache is no reason to call a dentist.

Byline: Valerie Hill

THIS week my husband had toothache. And not just a dull little pain that goes away with a couple of pills. No, rather that, banging-your-head-on-the-bed post kind of agony that men never experience because they don't give birth.

Not that I'm saying men have a low pain threshold. Some can even tolerate having their egos bruised for charity, but a searing toothache is a nightmare for anyone. I did sympathise - a little.

Of course, it had to strike on a Saturday. Have you tried getting an emergency dental appointment at the weekend? I had a surreal conversation with a phone operator who was probably in a call centre in Delhi. The polite but firm young lady asked me if my husband had seen a dentist in the last six months.

But of course, I replied smugly. The Hills are very particular about their oral health. So he has had undergone treatment for this problem, persisted Miss Bollywood.

No, I screamed. It only started last night! But, apparently, seeing a dentist anytime within the last millennium disqualifies you from getting an emergency appointment. You are classed as someone else's patient and apparently there is honour amongst dentists. They won't pinch a fellow driller's lucrative source of income.

It was turning into a nightmare scenario like the one in the film Marathon Man with Dustin Hoffman and nasty Nazi dentist Laurence Olivier - and my husband wasn't even in the chair yet.

There was no alternative - I had to go alternative. A friend of ours practises acupuncture and he agreed to have a go.

He didn't bother with fripperies like looking at the tooth in question but set to work with his piercing rods.

He placed what looked like two tiny metal drawing pins in each of my husband's ears (you know, the kind of thing Cherie Blair has) and sent him home. Within a few hours, the pain had dramatically subsided and my husband was at least able to chew gingerly on popcorn at that afternoon's viewing of `Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets.' What a relief for the pain relief. My husband had had auricular therapy which is a specific brand of Chinese acupuncture focusing on the ear. The ear is believed to mirror the shape of the foetus in the womb; the lobe represents the head, and points relating to the tongue, eyes, tonsils, teeth and ears, are all found on the lobe.

There are said to be up to 300 points which correspond to various parts of the body and inserting a needle affects the corresponding organ or meridian.

IF THERE is disharmony in a meridian it can affect the corresponding organs. Toothache in the upper gums is said to come from disharmony in the stomach meridian.

The Chinese consider the ear to be perfect for such therapy because it is a reflection of the kidneys - and the kidneys are thought to be the root of everything and can affect every diagnosis and treatment.

Apparently my husband has low kidney energy which is why his teeth are fragile. It's also why his hair has fallen out. But that's another story, or rather column.

FEELING tired and bunged up? Sounds like you've got a winter cold. But all this could have been prevented had you been taking Boots' Winter Care capsules (pounds 8.50).

This dietary supplement can provide good health throughout the chilly months. It contains Vitamin C and Zinc to support a healthy immune system, while Cod Liver Oil maintains flexible joints. Finally, ginger extracts has reputed benefits for maintaining a healthy circulation.
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Title Annotation:Features
Publication:Daily Post (Liverpool, England)
Date:Nov 19, 2002
Words:599
Previous Article:INSIDE OUT: What drives a woman to cheat on her man?; Penny Fray speaks to an adulteress about the fling that ended a friendship and nearly cost her...
Next Article:INSIDE OUT: One man, one brush and the five-minute hair make-over; Stylist Luke Gove takes to the streets with Penny Fray.


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