Printer Friendly

IN THE BATTLE FOR PEST CONTROL, SEATTLE CITY LIGHT GOES NATURAL: A "NEW" WEAPON IN THE WAR ON BUGS

 SEATTLE, July 13 /PRNewswire/ -- Seattle City Light today released the following:
 When vegetation-management crews go to work on aphid-infested oak trees at Seattle City Light's North Service Center tomorrow morning, they will release not nasty chemicals, but bugs: 15,000 green lacewing eggs purchased from a commercial insectary.
 Wednesday morning's lacewing release marks the first time the utility has used lacewings to control insects in Seattle.
 Hoisted in utility bucket trucks, workers will apply lacewing eggs to the trees by hand. As the non-native lacewing larvae hatch, the voracious aphid-eaters will knock back the aphids dramatically, then die as the weather cools this winter. To maintain a robust army, City Light crews will supplement the lacewings' diets this summer with a nutritious mixture of sugar and pollen substitute supplied from nearby feeding stations.
 The green lacewing release is one part of Seattle City Light's Integrated Pest Management (IPM) strategy, aimed at selecting the least toxic method of pest control possible, and turning to pesticides only as a last resort.
 The strategy is working: Since the mid-'80s, when Seattle City Light phased in its IPM approach, the utility has reduced pesticide use by 50 to 75 percent. Non-chemical controls of tansy ragwort and other noxious weeds have been so successful that City Light has applied no herbicide to its 180 miles of powerline right-of-ways for the past three years.
 According to a statewide survey conducted by Seattle City Light, Washington utilities released more than 95,000 gallons of mixed herbicides in 1992. Other utilities have re-examined their herbicide use in recent years, but Seattle City Light is the only Washington utility with an active Integrated Pest Management program.
 Beyond using biological controls to manage weeds and insect pests, City Light has done some of the first experimentation with geotextile fabrics to suppress weeds, and re-examined traditional assumptions about what levels of vegetation can be tolerated in substations and right-of- ways without posing electrical safety hazards.
 -0- 7/13/93
 /CONTACT: Scott Forslund of Seattle City Light, 206-386-4233/


CO: Seattle City Light ST: Washington IN: UTI SU:

SB-JH -- SE004 -- 0928 07/13/93 13:34 EDT
COPYRIGHT 1993 PR Newswire Association LLC
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1993 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Jul 13, 1993
Words:354
Previous Article:FIRST FIDELITY EARNS $1.13 PER SHARE IN SECOND QUARTER, UP 21.5 PERCENT FROM PRIOR YEAR'S PERIOD
Next Article:BOEING: DENTON HANFORD NAMED HELICOPTERS VICE PRESIDENT
Topics:


Related Articles
Luring good bugs to feed on the bad.
Gypsies and beetles and frass - oh, my!
Insects bugged by 'jumping genes.' (retrotransposons, virus-like DNA fragments, may be useful in controlling insect pests)
Dealing with what's bugging you.
Keeping Bugs at Bay.
BUG BATTLE DESIGNED TO WIPE OUT APHID POPULATION.
BUGGING YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD TINY BEETLES ARRIVE TO GOBBLE UP PESTS.

Terms of use | Copyright © 2017 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters