Printer Friendly

IBM ENLARGES SET OF PRODUCTS FOR SHARING INFORMATION; NEW PRODUCTS LINK DIVERSE NETWORKS FOR CLIENT/SERVER COMPUTING

 IBM ENLARGES SET OF PRODUCTS FOR SHARING INFORMATION;
 NEW PRODUCTS LINK DIVERSE NETWORKS FOR CLIENT/SERVER COMPUTING
 WHITE PLAINS, N.Y., June 16 /PRNewswire/ -- New products announced today by IBM Corporation (NYSE: IBM) give businesses a way to combine different types of computers into a single, cohesive network at attractive prices.
 They join a list of more than 500 networking applications from IBM and its business partners that can easily connect a wide variety of computers so users can work together more efficiently and productively.
 As a result, the new products give businesses a way to capitalize on emerging technologies like "client/server" computing.
 Client/server computing makes it possible for desktop users to get any information they need -- whether it is stored in a computer in their own building or halfway around the world -- and share it with other users who have different kinds of computers.
 Enabling businesses to realize such efficiencies is a paramount consideration of the Networking Blueprint that IBM announced in March.
 A new release of IBM's TCP/IP for MVS(see Note A) software offers significant benefits to businesses running workstation applications that need to instantly exchange information with mainframe applications.
 Part of this new release is a CICS(B) to TCP/IP Socket Interface which helps save time and money by making it easy to connect TCP/IP applications running on workstations directly to CICS applications running on a mainframe.
 Take a typical example of a mail order company that enters its customer orders on TCP/IP workstations but maintains its inventory in a mainframe CICS application. By using the interface to link the two, the company can instantly process customer orders. Without the interface, it has two costly alternatives: either cross-check orders against inventory one a day or buy additional hardware to connect them.
 IBM also announced the 3172 Interconnect Controller Model 3 to send information from Token-Ring, Ethernet, and FDDI (fiber) local area networks (LANs) to mainframes. When used with the new TCP/IP for MVS release, the Model 3 can operate in a new, cost-saving mode enabled by a TCP/IP Offload application.
 This application makes it more affordable to run operations that depend on information being exchanged between LAN workstations and a mainframe. With TCP/IP Offload, some of the TCP/IP work can be handled by a 3172 instead of by a mainframe, thereby freeing the mainframe to handle other tasks related to TCP/IP applications. Freeing the resources of a mainframe to this extent can mean a tenfold return on the investment in the new controller and TCP/IP Offload application.
 Typically, the Model 3 and its software cost about one-third less than current models. When operated in standard mode without TCP/IP Offload, it also performs twice as fast as the Model 1 because of better data handling and a powerful Intel 80486 microprocessor. This improved performance is especially attractive to users who need to share large data files, such as those used in scientific and engineering applications, with other users on the network.
 Also, the 3172 Model 2 is enhanced so that it can now send data across Token-Ring and Ethernet LANs as well as FDDI LANs.
 One-time charges for TCP/IP for MVS Version 2 Release 2 range from $30,040 to $96,360, depending on the size of the computer it runs on. It will be available on June 26, 1992. Prices for the 3172 Model 2 start at $63,380. Prices for the 3172 Model 3 range from $21,970 to $33,749. Models 2 and 3, along with the TCP/IP Offload application that works with the Model 3, will be available on Sept. 25, 1992.
 (A) -- Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) is a de facto networking standard pioneered by U.S. government and academic organizations and is now widely used in businesses for communications between computers from different makers. Multiple Virtual Storage (MVS) is an operating system that runs on IBM's Enterprise System/9000(C) mainframe computers.
 (B) -- Customer Information Control System (CICS) is a software program that gives users real-time access to information in large data bases through on-line transaction processing applications.
 (C) -- Enterprise System/9000 is a trademark of IBM Corporation.
 -0- 6/16/92
 /CONTACT: Nancy Meyers, 914-642-5458, or Clifton Scott, 914-642-5457, both of IBM/
 (IBM) CO: International Business Machines Corporation ST: New York IN: CPR SU: PDT


GK -- NY013 -- 0520 06/16/92 09:24 EDT
COPYRIGHT 1992 PR Newswire Association LLC
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1992 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Jun 16, 1992
Words:741
Previous Article:CHRYSLER CREDIT TO PURCHASE CFC-3 GRANTOR TRUST CERTIFICATES
Next Article:BROWN-FORMAN REPORTS RECORD FISCAL 1992 EARNINGS
Topics:


Related Articles
Network computing provides missing links.
WANG ANNOUNCES EASY-TO-USE PRODUCTS TO LINK UNIX SYSTEMS WITH PC LANS
APPLE INTRODUCES DAL SERVER FOR IBM AS/400 SYSTEMS
IBM LAUNCHES NEW CLIENT/SERVER COMPUTING UNIT; ANNOUNCES WORLDWIDE CUSTOMER SERVICE CENTERS
DCA INTRODUCES NEW COMMUNICATIONS SPECIFICATION; ANNOUNCES NEW COMMUNICATIONS PRODUCT FOR IBM AS/400
IBM INFORMATION WAREHOUSE FRAMEWORK ENHANCED WITH NEW PRODUCTS, SUPPORT FOR OPEN AND CLIENT/SERVER ENVIRONMENTS
IBM EXTENDS DISTRIBUTED COMPUTING CAPABILITIES WITH APPLE & SYSTEM STRATEGIES; ENABLE MULTI-VENDOR COMMUNICATIONS FOR IMPROVED COMPUTING
IBM frees users from master-slave strictures of SNA.
NOVELL TO SHIP NETWARE FOR SAA 2.0
IDEA AND MEMOREX TELEX PARTNER TO DELIVER FIRST WEB BROWSER AND E-MAIL FOR SNA TERMINALS

Terms of use | Copyright © 2016 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters