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IBM ANNOUNCES FIRST USE OF 16-MILLION-BIT CHIP

 IBM ANNOUNCES FIRST USE OF 16-MILLION-BIT CHIP
 ESSEX JUNCTION, Vt., Feb. 18 /PRNewswire/ -- IBM (NYSE: IBM) today


announced that the AS/400(A) is the first product to use the company's 16-million-bit chip, the industry's first use of this advanced memory technology.
 The 16-megabit dynamic random access memory (DRAM) chip will be used in a new 128-megabyte (MB) card in the high-end AS/400 model E90, representing the densest memory card yet offered to AS/400 customers. The card increases main memory capacity of the AS/400 to 512 MB, more than a 30 percent increase in the capacity of previous offerings.
 "This represents IBM's first step in applying this new technology across our product line," said Paul R. Low, IBM vice president and general manager, Technology Products. "We plan to introduce 16-million- bit technology in new products this year and beyond, taking advantage of the increased capacity and performance this new chip provides.
 "This announcement continues IBM's leadership in being the first to put each new generation of memory technology to work for our customers."
 IBM was the first to use 1-million-bit chips in a system, the first to use 4-million-bit chips in a system and, with this announcement, is the first to use 16-million-bit chips.
 The 16-million-bit chip has four times the capacity of today's most advanced chips, storing the equivalent of about 1,600 pages of double- spaced typewritten text.
 It operates at very high speed, with the capability to access the first bit of data in 50 nanoseconds (billionths of a second) and subsequent bits in only 10 nanoseconds. At this speed, nearly all of the chip's 16,777,216 bits can be "read" in only 1/25th of a second.
 Measuring 7.8 millimeters by 18.06 millimeters (about 1/3 inch by 3/4 inch), the chip has circuit patterns with dimensions as small as 0.5 micrometers (millionths of a meter) wide, or nearly 200 times thinner than a strand of hair.
 The chip achieves its greater capacity through the use of a memory cell (the area of the chip that stores one bit of data) that is only 4 micrometers square, approximately one-third the size of the memory cell in IBM's four-megabit chip. Some 250,000 of these cells would fit in an area 1 millimeter square -- about the size of the head of a pin.
 The chip's reliability is enhanced through the use of error correcting and checking (ECC) code during operation, an industry first. Use of ECC improves the chip's ability to protect against failures compared with previous generations of chips.
 The 128 MB card was developed at IBM's Rochester, Minn., facility. The 16-megabit chip was developed and manufactured at IBM's semiconductor facility in Essex Junction. It will also be manufactured at IBM's facility in Essonnes, France.
 (A) -- Trademark or registered trademark of International Business Machines Corporation.
 -0- 2/18/92
 /CONTACT: Jeff Couture of IBM, 802-769-3687/
 (IBM) CO: International Business Machines Corp. ST: New York IN: CPR SU: PDT


CK -- NY034 -- 9839 02/18/92 10:29 EST
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Date:Feb 18, 1992
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