Printer Friendly

I want that job: want to help save lives? Consider a career at a blood bank.

WHAT IS A BLOOD BANK?

A blood bank is a place where blood collected from volunteer donors is stored for later use in medical procedures. Blood banks can be part of a hospital, or a separate facility in your community.

WHO WORKS AT A BLOOD BANK?

Pathologists typically manage blood banks. These medical doctors specialize in the study and cause of illnesses. Medical technologists work alongside pathologists in the blood bank's lab analyzing blood samples. These health professionals help physicians to detect, diagnose, and treat diseases.

WHAT DOES THE STAFF AT A BLOOD BANK DO?

An important job for people working at a blood bank is to encourage people 17 years or older to donate blood. Blood components only last from a few days to a year and hospitals are always in need of fresh supplies. Once volunteers give blood, a medical technologist screens the blood to determine the blood type and to make sure it's free of infectious diseases. They also perform tests to determine whether the blood is a good match for a patient.

[ILLUSTRATIONS OMITTED]

HOW DO BLOOD BANKS HELP PEOPLE?

Blood banks make sure there's enough life-saving blood to go around. People undergoing surgery, suffering from blood disorders like anemia (a low number of red blood cells), or involved in a traumatic accident may require a blood transfusion. Without blood banks, 4.5 million Americans would die each year.

HOW DO YOU TRAIN TO BECOME A MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIST OR PATHOLOGIST?

To become a medical technologist you need a college degree in medical technology and are required to pass a certification exam. Pathologists need an undergraduate degree, four years of medical school, and at least four more years of residency, or on-the-job training in pathology.

HOW MUCH MONEY DO MEDICAL TECHNOLOGISTS AND PATHOLOGISTS EARN?

A medical technologist's starting salary is around $40,000, while a physician working at a blood bank starts out earning roughly $120,000.
COPYRIGHT 2007 Scholastic, Inc.
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 2007, Gale Group. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Title Annotation:CAREERS
Publication:Science World
Date:Nov 12, 2007
Words:320
Previous Article:What's your type? To find out how your personality affects your future, forget horoscopes. The answer could be in your blood type.
Next Article:A voice for autism: Taylor Cross has autism. Doctors once said he might never walk or talk. Now he's a teenage filmmaker, proving them all wrong....
Topics:


Related Articles
What's your type? To find out how your personality affects your future, forget horoscopes. The answer could be in your blood type.
Dangerous obsession: for people with eating disorders, a focus on food can be a recipe for disaster.

Terms of use | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2019 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters