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Homoeopathy.

Nayak C, Singh V, Singh VP, Oberai P, Roi V, Shitanshu SS, Sinha MN, Deewan D, Lakhera BC, Ramteke S, Kaushik S, Sarka S, Mandal NR, Mohanan PG, Singh JR, Biswas S, Mathew G. Homeopathy in chronic sinusitis: A prospective multi-centric observational study. Homeopathy. 2012;101(2):84

Objective: The primary objective was to ascertain the therapeutic usefulness of homeopathic medicine in the management of chronic sinusitis (CS).

Materials and methods: Multicentre observational study at Institutes and Units of the Central Council for Research in Homoeopathy, India. Symptoms were assessed using the chronic sinusitis assessment score (CSAS). 17 pre-defined homeopathic medicines were shortlisted for prescription on the basis of repertorisation for the pathological symptoms of CS. Regimes and adjustment of regimes in the event of a change of symptoms were pre-defined. The follow-up period was for 6 months. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS version 16.

Results: 628 patients suffering from CS confirmed on X-ray were enrolled from eight Institutes and Units of the Central Council for Research in Homoeopathy. All 550 patients with at least one follow-up assessment were analyzed. There was a statistically significant reduction in CSAS (P = 0.0001, Friedman test) after 3 and 6 months of treatment. Radiological appearances also improved. A total of 13 out of 17 pre-defined medicines were prescribed in 550 patients, Sil. (55.2% of 210), Calc. (62.5% of 98), Lyc. (69% of 55), Phos. (66.7% of 45) and Kali iod. (65% of 40) were found to be most useful having marked improvement. 4/17 medicines were never prescribed. No complications were observed during treatment.

Conclusion: Homeopathic treatment may be effective for CS patients. Controlled trials are required for further validation.

Schmidt JM. The biopsychosocial model and its potential for a new theory of homeopathy. Homoeopathy. 2012;111(2):121-128

Since the nineteenth century the theory of conventional medicine has been developed in close alignment with the mechanistic paradigm of natural sciences. Only in the twentieth century occasional attempts were made to (re)introduce the 'subject' into medical theory, as by Thure von Uexkull (19082004) who elaborated the so-called biopsychosocial model of the human being, trying to understand the patient as a unit of organic, mental, and social dimensions of life. Although widely neglected by conventional medicine, it is one of the most coherent, significant, and up-to-date models of medicine at present.

Being torn between strict adherence to Hahnemann's original conceptualization and alienation caused by contemporary scientific criticism, homeopathy today still lacks a generally accepted, consistent, and definitive theory which would explain in scientific terms its strength, peculiarity, and principles without relapsing into biomedical reductionism. The biopsychosocial model of the human being implies great potential for a new theory of homeopathy, as may be demonstrated with some typical examples.

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Title Annotation:Recent Research June 2012; chronic sinusitis
Publication:Journal of the Australian Traditional-Medicine Society
Article Type:Report
Geographic Code:8AUST
Date:Jun 1, 2012
Words:459
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