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Helpin children deal with trauma and terrorism. (ERIC/EECE Report).

This column summarizes recent ERIC documents and journal articles, and highlights some World Wide Web resources, that discuss ways of helping children deal with traumatic events, both natural and human-caused, including the effects of terrorism. For details about ERIC and ordering ERIC documents, please see the information following these abstracts.

ED449440 MOURNING CHILD GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP CURRICULUM: Early Childhood Edition, Kindergarten-Grade 2. 2001. 137 pp. Linda Lehmann, Shane R. Jimerson, & Ann Gaasch. (Not available from EDRS. Write: Brunner-Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group, 7625 Empire Drive, Florence, KY 41042.) Each of these Mourning Child grief support curriculum editions is intended to help children who have experienced the death of someone special, and is designed for professionals who work in settings that serve bereaved children. Each curriculum contains 10-session lesson plans that include age-appropriate activities to ease the way for discussion of painful topics. Each session contains instructions and learning objectives that guide the user through the curriculum. The introduction to each book discusses how the entire family must work through the grief process, and presents instructions on how group facilitators should handle the sessions.

ED449439 MOURNING CHILD GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP CURRICULUM: Preschool Edition. Denny the Duck Stories. 2001. 179 pp. Linda Lehmann, Shane R. Jimerson, & Ann Gaasch. (Not available from EDRS. Write: Brunner-Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group, 7625 Empire Drive, Florence, KY 41042.) Each of these Mourning Child grief support curriculum editions is intended to help children who have experienced the death of someone special, and is designed for professionals who work in settings that serve bereaved children. Each curriculum contains 10-session lesson plans that include age-appropriate activities to ease the way for discussion of painful topics. Each session contains instructions and learning objectives that guide the user through the curriculum. The introduction to each book discusses how the entire family must work through the grief process, and presents instructions on how group facilitators should handle the sessions.

ED440318 PLAY THERAPY WITH CHILDREN IN CRISIS: Individual, Group, and Family Treatment. Second Edition. Nancy Boyd Webb, Ed. 1999. 506pp. (Not available from EDRS; Write: Guilford Press, 72 Spring St., New York, NY 10012.) This casebook focuses on treatment of children who have experienced or witnessed violent or terrorist acts. Managed care counselors are more frequently called on to provide short-term, intermittent, and group therapy to help these children. Although traditional one-on-one interventions continue to be appropriate for some children, many children can benefit from these briefer methods. The book presents case studies that give readers a glimpse into the content of therapy sessions, along with the clinician's accompanying rationale for intervention. A variety of play therapy methods are demonstrated.

ED435067 HELPING CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS COPE WITH VIOLENCE AND DISASTERS. Fact Sheet. National Institute of Mental Health. 1999. 9 pp. This fact sheet shares information about the impact of violence and disasters on children and suggests steps to minimize long-term emotional harm. It notes that even secondhand exposure to violence can be traumatic; therefore, all children exposed to violence or disaster, even if only through media, should be watched for signs of distress. Many children who have been exposed to traumatic events exhibit loss of trust and fear of the event's recurrence. After violence or a disaster occurs, the family is the first-line resource for helping. Among the things that parents can do are explain the episode, encourage children to express their feelings, let children know that it is normal to feel upset, and allow time for the youngsters to talk about their feelings. The fact sheet concludes with a discussion of post-traumatic stress disorder.

ED409503 WORKING WITH TRAUMATIZED CHILDREN: A Handbook for Healing. Kathryn Brohl. 1996. 112 pp. (Not available from EDRS; Write: Child Welfare League of America, 440 First St., N.W., Suite 310, Washington, DC 20001-2085.) Practical suggestions for professionals or others who work with traumatized children are offered in this handbook. It also explains such treatment methods as panic attack intervention and metaphorical storytelling, and describes the stages from trauma to recovery. Some resilience traits exhibited by children also are discussed. Other topics addressed include the impact of trauma on society, ways to recognize symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder, and healing interventions. One chapter offers suggestions for the self-care of child advocates, as well.

ED399087 WHEN NOTHING MAKES SENSE: Disaster, Crisis, and Their Effects on Children. Gerald Deskin & Greg Steckler. 1996. 224 pp. (Not available from EDRS; Write Fairview Press, 2450 Riverside Avenue South, Minneapolis, MN 55454.) This book helps adults prepare for children's reactions to a disaster, natural or otherwise. The introductory chapter examines the nature of disasters, and defines and details the symptoms of stress. Factors that influence how a person handles a disaster are explored. The remaining chapters address children's reactions to a crisis, what to do before and after a disaster, family problems after a disaster, cultural differences in handling stress, the impact of the media, and the aftereffects of a disaster years later.

ED392533 WHEN DISASTER STRIKES: Helping Young Children Cope. Jane M. Farish. 1995. 11 pp. (Not available from EDRS; Write: National Association for the Education of Young Children, 1509 16th St., N.W., Washington, DC 20036-1426.) This brochure presents a number of strategies for teachers to use in helping children cope with stress from natural and other disasters. These strategies include: 1)providing reassurance and physical comfort; 2) being aware of separation anxiety; 3) maintaining familiar daily patterns; 4) encouraging children to discuss, write, draw, or act out their feelings; 5) reading aloud from books with characters who cope with stress; 6) using play therapy; 7) helping children to learn conflict resolution; and 8) creating emergency plans. Family programs and personal coping strategies for teachers are discussed. Typical symptoms of stress in young children are delineated.

EJ598701 CHILDHOOD TRAUMA. Tony Falasca & Thomas J. Caulfield. Journal of Humanistic Counseling, Education and Development, Vol. 37, No. 4 (June 1999): 212-223. This article describes classic causes and symptoms of trauma, factors that relate to how a child is affected by trauma, and considerations for providing treatment to traumatized children. It also categorizes a range of disaster victim behaviors into three groups: affect, memories, and behaviors.

EJ596775 TREATING POSTTRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER IN CHILDREN AND FAMILIES: Basic Principles and Clinical Applications. Laurence Miller. American Journal of Family Therapy, Vol. 27, No. 1 (January-March 1999): 21-34. This article details the Posttraumatic Child Therapy Program's approach for working with children exposed to catastrophic violence. The program's phases are: pre-therapy, stabilization of response, returning to the psychogeographic scene, and moving toward integration.

EJ534026 HOW A SCHOOL COPED WITH THE OKLAHOMA CITY BOMBING. David N. Aspy & Cheryl B. Aspy. Educational Leadership, Vol. 54, No. 2 (October 1996): 82-84. Following the Oklahoma City bombing, the 5th-graders at a nearby school coped with the ensuing uncertainty by writing letters to rescue workers, sharing personal stories with classmates, compiling an anthology of stories, attending an assembly to honor parents who participated in rescue efforts, and planting trees in memory of the victims.

EJ531263 WE CAN HELP CHILDREN GRIEVE: A Child-Oriented Model for Memorializing. Linda Ellen Goldman. Young Children, Vol. 51, No. 6 (September 1996): 69-73. This article presents grief counseling guidelines for the school, community, and parents. Memorializing the deceased helps children understand death and creates a foundation for the grief process. Age-oriented concepts of death, ideas for memorializing victims, and resources are listed.

EJ523514 CHILDREN OF THE HEARTLAND. Kathryn Castle, Lori Beasley, & Linda Skinner. Childhood Education, Vol. 72, No. 4 (Summer 1996): 226-231. This article describes the reaction of a 2nd-grade class in Oklahoma to the Oklahoma City bombing. The children found ways to ask questions and express their feelings during class discussions. Tips are provided for teachers to help children who are going through trauma.

EJ507200 THE RESOLUTION SCRAPBOOK AS AN AID IN THE TREATMENT OF TRAUMATIZED CHILDREN. Liana B. Lowenstein. Child Welfare, Vol. 74, No. 4 (July-August 1995): 889-904. This therapeutic technique encourages traumatized children to complete treatment activities and compile them in a "resolution scrapbook." Scrapbook activities have been found to facilitate children's resolution of trauma, and their progress through the phases of treatment becomes a lasting record.

EJ503842 OVERVIEW OF DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF PSYCHOLOGICAL TRAUMA IN CHILDREN. Carlton E. Munson. Early Child Development and Care, Vol. 106 (February 1995): 149-166. This article defines psychological trauma and offers guidance to practitioners who are increasingly needed to treat traumatized children. Key therapy considerations are organized around the role of dissociation and repetition compulsion. Treatment addresses the feeling of solitude that can overwhelm those who are traumatized, the use of therapeutic animals, and parent-child interventions.

National Parent Information Network (NPIN)

Talking about terrorism, tragedy, and resilience: Resources for parents, teachers, and family support professionals

http://npin.org/library/2001/ n00578/n00578.html

National Child Care Information Center (NCCIC)

Helping children cope with violence, terrorism, and grief

http://nccic.org/helpkids.html

http://nccic.org/helpkidssp. html (Spanish)

U.S. Department of Education

Helping children understand the terrorist attacks

www.ed.gov/inits/september11/ index.html

www.ed.gov/inits/september11/ index-es.html (Spanish)

National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC)

Helping children cope with disaster www.naeyc.org/coping_with_ disaster.htm

National Network for Child Care (NNCC)

Caring for children in troubled times www2.ag.ohio-state.edu/ ~kidshelp/homepage.htm

The ERIC Clearinghouse on Elementary and Early Childhood Education (ERIC/EECE) contributed this column. Abstracts of ERIC documents and journal articles can be read on ERIC microfiche and on CD-ROM, which are available in many libraries. The ERIC database is also available on-line. For on-line locations to search the ERIC database, visit the ACCESS ERIC Web site at www.eric.ed.gov. Most ERIC documents can be ordered in paper copy or on microfiche, and many recent documents can be ordered on the Internet, or from the ERIC Document Reproduction Service (EDRS). For complete ordering information, contact EDRS at 800-443-3742, http://edrs.com, or service@edrs.com. An availability source is indicated for those documents summarized in this column that are not available from EDRS. For journal articles cited in the column, refer directly to the journal or contact article clearinghouses such as Ingenta (800-296-2221) for ordering information. Further information on elementary and early childhood education is available from ERIC/EECE, Children's Research Center, University of Illinois, 51 Gerty Drive, Champaign, IL 61820-7469; phone: 217-333-1386 or 800-583-4135; E-mail: ericeece@uiuc.edu; URL: http:/ /ericeece.org/.
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Title Annotation:articles, reports, and web sites reviewed
Author:Cesarone, Bernard
Publication:Childhood Education
Article Type:Bibliography
Geographic Code:1USA
Date:Mar 22, 2002
Words:1725
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