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Helpful strategies for designing a comprehensive self-study for university communications media departments.

Introduction

The Department of Communications Media at IUP is part of the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education (PASSHE). Periodically, State and local administrators request the COMM Department to conduct an extensive Self-Study. The basic premise of a Self-Study is that the Department, in concert with the local administration, decides on a series of questions or assumptions that need to be investigated related to the department's value or impact as a credit bearing body. From institution to institution, the cycle of Self-Study requests vary in duration time between studies. At IUP this could be a five to ten year cycle. In the case of the COMM Department at IUP, the commitment for an exhaustive Self-Study happened to cycle every ten years (2005, 1995, and 1985).

Most faculty dread hearing the word "Self-Study" given that it is a labor intensive effort involving administration, faculty, undergraduate students, graduate students, alumni, and partners both within and external to the university. it also involves evaluators selected by the faculty, but approved by the administration, from within the university (usually two from other departments) and external to the university. The two external evaluators are usually known by the Department faculty. The Chair of the Department is often ex officio to the Self-Study Committee, which means to serve on the committee given his elected office. The leadership of the effort is done by one or two faculty members. The Self-Study Chair or Co-Chairs may receive work load release (which is a rarity in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in the last decade) or be provided student support (either hourly student employees or a graduate assistant).

The study generally takes two academic semesters to gather and process the necessary data (surveys, interviews, existing department or university data, etc.) and provide the results and recommendations in the final document(s). The document(s) must address the primary questions or assumptions.

The case study presented in this paper highlights efforts by the Department of Communications Media to conduct a thorough Self-Study during 2004 and 2005. The Co-Chairs of the Self- Study effort were Dr. Richard Lamberski, Professor in the department and Dr. Kurt Dudt, Professor and Chair of the department. The authors of this case study paper wanted to document the successful process (stages, instruments, outcomes, etc.) used since there is little literature specific to a department's self evaluation.

Overview of the Process

In order to present the case study of the Department of Communications 2004-2005 Self-Study, its best to describe a series of stages that the process went through.

* Stage 1: Notification by administration that a Self-Study needs to be conducted

** Identification of Self-Study Chair(s) with acceptance by the department of the leadership

** Determination of the critical questions or assumptions to be addressed

** Assessment of staffing support and existing data that might be available

* Stage 2: Development of an action plan

** Given agreement of questions or assumptions, determine what data needs to be collected and presented for possible discussion

** Obtain examples of Self-Studies performed by other departments in the university for use in developing an action plan

** Determine a time chart and responsibility chart for each of the steps in the action plan

* Stage 3: Data collection

** Acquire data that might be existing, placing it in a usable format

** Determine data that must be collected and develop survey instruments, interview protocols, or other collection means

** Perform initial qualitative or quantitative analysis of the data to derive findings or patterns

** Organize and catalogue findings (indexed files, figures, diagrams, etc.)

* Stage 4: Prepare the final document(s)

** Prepare tables, charts, diagrams, lists, etc. that might present the data for better comprehension and continuity of design

** Prepare a logical outline of the sections of the Self-Study

** Prepare a draft document including the primary narratives for each section along with supportive data and illustrations

* Stage 5: Share the working draft with both faculty and administration

** Collect final editorial or creative suggestions

** If needed, obtain or collect missing data

* Stage 6: Prepare the final documents for printing, distribution and archiving

Discussion of Appended Resources

The authors of this paper want to provide an overview of the 2005 Self-Study final documents. To do so in the section below entitled "final documents" we outline the two reports (Vol. 1 &2) that comprised final documentation. The second part of the paper is to provide examples or templates from the Self- Study documents that might serve as guides for replication by other professionals/departments in the future. We have provided a summary description and rationale for selected resources appended (see appendices A to L). Lastly, the authors will reflect and provide recommendations given the entire process.

Final Documents. The Department of Communications Media conducted an extensive Self-Study from September 2004 until may 2005. in order to present this extensive work the final document was broken into two volumes. Volume 1 was a short executive summary consisting of an abstract page, a description of four action plans consisting of recommendations to be addressed in the coming years, and an outlined discussion of the Self-Study findings presented in Volume 2. Volume 1 was 26 pages in length. Volume 2 was a very lengthy document consisting of nine major areas, which was approximately 120 pages in length. These areas include: An Orientation to the Self-Study; Department Overview; Resources; Faculty: Self-Reported Data-Quantitative; Faculty: Reflective Data-Qualitative; Quantitative Data: Provided by the Administration; curriculum; outcomes; and evaluators. A descriptive orientation to each of these nine major areas with 34 supportive appendices was provided in Volume 2 (See Appendix A).

An Explanation of Selected Appended Resources. The resources labeled and described in this section and provided in Appendices A-L were selected from Volume 2 in order to give a collection of materials that would be helpful for someone who may be charged with the task of conducting their own departmental Self-Study. Below is a description of each of the selected appendices and the rationale that each make to the overall study. This paper's appendices are merely a glimpse of what the overall Self-Study included.

Appendix A--Self-Study Table of Contents

* Description--The five page document provided shows the critical organization of all the data sets that were used to investigate and substantiate resulting recommendations. There are nine major sections to the table of contents:

** Orientation to the Self Study (three subcomponents)

** Department overview (four subcomponents)

** Resources (three subcomponents)

** Faculty: Self-Reported Data--Quantitative (two subcomponents)

** Faculty: Reflective Data--Qualitative (four subcomponents)

** Quantitative Data: Provided by the Administration (six subcomponents)

** Curriculum (five subcomponents)

** Outcomes (five subcomponents)

** Evaluators (two subcomponents)

* Rationale--This is the heart of the Self-Study. Not only does it layout each individual section of the study, it gives a brief description as well. So for example, some readers may not understand what Snyder Data Analysis for the Communications Media Department is, however, if they view number 12 of Appendix A under Faculty: Self-Reported Data-Quantitative they should have a better idea. This holds true for the entire study because if at any point the reader becomes unclear about the data being presented they simply have to reference this section.

Appendix B -Primary Questions: Self-Study

* Description--The Self-Study revolves around primary questions for the Department and evaluators. This section has all questions available for review. These questions were approved by the Department and accepted by the administration. The final Self-Study report "Volume 1: Abstract, Action Plan & Discussion" (Submitted in early May, 2005) was written to address these questions.

* Rationale--This section is significant because it allows the reader to see the exact questions that the researchers used when conducting the Self-Study. This allows the reader to see how the different sections shown in the overall study help to answer these questions. This acts as the road map to a productive and successful self-study.

Appendix C--Facilities Description (Example of one of eight)

* Description--The Department has been able to evolve unique support facilities for the offering of its undergraduate program and co-curricular activities. An overview is provided in this section of these facilities dedicated solely to the Department or facilities that are University resources significantly used by our program. These facilities represent some of the more complex technology facilities supported within the university.

* Rationale--Within this section the reader will find a description of the Graphics section of the Self-Study (as example). It is important to see that impact data is shown with different types of software, hardware, and uses for the facility. This part of the study will allow the department to allocate resources and funds to help upgrade obsolete equipment facilities.

Appendix D--Five Points of Pride of the Faculty (Example of one of 12)

* Description--Faculty members were asked to provide five statements regarding their personal pride, given the 1995-2004 time period. It should be noted that some of the more recent faculty members could only reflect on fewer semesters. These statements are provided unedited for each faculty member.

* Rationale--This section is of interest because it shows what different faculty members find important and meaningful to them. The example given shows a blend of various areas of interest from mentorship to scholarship.

Appendix E--Five Points of Pride of the Department by Faculty (Example of one of 12)

* Description--Faculty members were asked to provide five statements of pride about the Department, given the 1995-2004 time period. These statements are provided unedited for each faculty member.

* Rationale--This section was interesting because it provides a faculty member's positive viewpoint about the Department. The interesting thing is that most faculty members did not say anything about the areas that they are primarily involved in. Each faculty member appeared to admire other professors and department resources.

Appendix F--Challenges the Department Needs to Overcome (Example of one of 12)

* Description--The faculty members were asked to provide three statements of concern. These concerns could either be focused on Department issues, personal-growth issues, or issues within the institution. These statements are provided unedited for each faculty member.

* Rationale--This section acts as a counterpoint to Appendices D & E. When doing a self-study, one must wonder what you would list as a constructive aspect of the department. This section gives a glimpse of what IUP COMM faculty critically perceived.

Appendix G--Advisee Assignment within the Department

* Description--Each student in the major is required to fill out a counseling sheet every semester which represents their academic progress. One side of the counseling sheet is for course identification for the major (left side) and for liberal studies requirements (right side). Courses that students are required to take are typed into each designated space. The student, with their advisor's counsel, then fills in the selected courses as they progress. The second side of the counseling form has evolved with continuing research by the Department. Typical questions are addressed along with special needs different students may need to know in fulfilling a Bachelor of Science Degree.

* Rationale--The total number of advisees each professor is assigned is interesting. This places a Department importance on exemplary advising and knowing what to do when advising. As a young faculty member, it may be hard to realize that you direct roughly 40 students on how to go through college and graduate each semester. These numbers help to put into perspective that faculty members do a lot of advising.

Appendix H--Areas of Professional Interest by Communications Media Entry Level Students

* Description--During the freshman or first transferred year of our majors, students take a core-required course (COMM 150--Aesthetics and Theory of Communications Media). Students enrolled in this course in the spring of 2005 were surveyed given their perceived career path. This section reports the findings of that survey.

* Rationale--This graph indicates the particular field of interest for entry level students. This compared to Appendices I and J is interesting because the reader can see a shift in the areas students want to be in and where they end up. This allows the administration to see that Communications Media has depth and that you are providing excellent service to students by making them diverse in the field.

Appendix I--Primary Concentrations of Communications Media Alumni 1980-2004

* Description--A survey instrument developed by the Department was sent out to 1018 Communications Media Alumni in mid-February, 2005. Out of the 1,018 surveys, 292 were sent back because of invalid email addresses, making the total amount of surveys received by alumni 718. This comprehensive data is the results of the 184 responses (26%) received and are broken down into 13 charts and three open-ended comments sheets.

* Rationale--Appendix I shows where alumni have ended up, which in comparison to Appendix H shows that students may study one area, but at some point they may change their focus and ultimately end somewhere different.

Appendix J--Alumni Places of Employment

* Description--This section provides a brief sampling of alumni places of employment.

* Rationale--This section works in conjunction with Appendix i to show the shift in focus of entry level students from Appendix H.

Appendix K- Annual Income of First Job in Communication Media According to Alumni

* Description--See description for Appendix I above.

* Rationale--This chart is interesting because it indicates the average starting salary for an entry level communications graduate. Many fall below $30,000, but it is also noted that several alumni make more than that, indicating that there are jobs with good entry level pay in communications, which shows that this is a field worth supporting

Appendix L--Curriculum Comparison (Example)

* Description--Communications Media students have several institutional options in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. The IUP Communications Media program has identified four other universities as options students consider. The data presents a curriculum comparison between IUP Communications Media and two institutions considered by students who ultimately chose our program and university.

* Rationale--This chart is intriguing because it shows how to compare your department to other regionally competing university's Communications Departments. it allows administrators to visually see how you have made your department competitive from other universities. it is very similar to stating everything about facilities, the researcher needs impact data and this chart showcases that.

Reflections and Recommendations on the Entire Process

Reflections (from the Self-Study Co-Chair and Department Chair- Dr. Kurt Dudt).

* On Faculty Input

When beginning a Self-Study for a department it is important to get everyone's input on what works and needs to be improved upon. All faculty members have a different perspective of the department and how it functions--this variation is an asset. it is important to find out from each source about the equipment and facilities that they use on a daily basis, because they have direct contact with many things others may not. By understanding the needs of the faculty a better overview of the department can be seen and the correct actions can be taken.

* On Choosing the Right External Reviewers

Choosing the right external reviewers was also a crucial step in the Self-Study process. The chosen reviewers should be talkative, understand the department mission, willing to interact, and brought in by people they know. The reviewers should be given a long term historical interview before their intervention. The reviewers should also have a deep cultural knowledge and a historical background that will allow them to understand where the department has been and where it is going. These people must have several traits that will allow you to get the most out of them and their reviews. They cannot possibly understand everything about the communications department without asking questions and receiving a hands-on experience. This will allow the reviewers to see how people interact and allow them to gain insight of how the department functions. Furthermore, they must have a thorough understanding of the department mission in order to guide their reviews and recommendations. if they are not clear about the mission, they could give recommendations that would lead the department off course. The external reviewers should also be resourceful and bring in other people they know. They should be able to write an excellent review by understanding the history, function, and direction of the communications department.

As examples of evaluator impact in the 2005 Self-Study, reviewers identified of one weak area: storytelling. Communications relies heavily on the storytelling element to persuade, create emotions, and change attitudes. This recommendation enabled several courses to be redeveloped to address the problem (documented photography, scriptwriting, etc). This also caused the department to allocate another faculty to scriptwriting enabling more sections to be offered. The course redevelopment initiated also included the creation of a documentary photography class, which focused on primarily on the elements of storytelling and the use of photography to convey a story. The reviewers also helped articulate a new direction for the radio and photography curriculums and resources.

* On The Self-Study Having Detail and Depth

The comprehensiveness of the final documents (Volume 1 and 2) enable the administration to have a better understanding of the department and future needs. The final documents served as evidence when asking for resources (faculty, facilities, other). it gave the administration a reality check. For example, the need for gaming major and the concept of doctoral program came from the Self-Study. A major contribution that the Self-Study had in our department was the value it had when allocating resources for the department. By creating an inventory of what each classroom had, a request could be put in to replace obsolete technology. With new technology we could begin to expand the department to include new majors, such as gaming, and also create a new cutting edge doctoral program. This self-study helped to secure resources, support, and publicity for the new ventures of the Communications Media Department.

The study verified physical plant, technology base, and needs transition (for example moving away from wet photo to digital). For years photography was produced inside a chemical driven room, blocked out from all light. Now with the innovation of digital photography many have given up on the expensive dark/wet photography and moved into the "light". IUP's decision to update to digital photography changed the direction of the entire department. The switch to digital allowed us to see that many other areas of communications could also benefit from upgrades and a change in philosophy. Audio, Television, and Video have all changed formats and upgraded to digital, which now allows students to have a much more realistic environment, complimentary of an actual workplace.

Closing quote: "The Self-Study was influential in confirming the direction the department was going to take!"

Recommendations (from the Self-Study Co-Chair--Dr. Lamberski)

* That administration provide alternative workload reduction of their normal teaching load to Chairs of Self-Studies Committees and adequate staff or student support staff in order to accomplish a comprehensive self study.

* That on an annual basis the department does an audit of the data maintained by administration to make sure it is related to and represents the department fairly. Because much data is collected and categorized by staff unrelated to the Department, coding of factual errors occur.

* That the department creates ongoing activities where performance data is collected and stored that might be applied when the next cycle of a Self-Study report is necessary.

* Some universities will eliminate or greatly reduce a department's Self-Study if the department is associated with a nationally accreditation association. in some academic disciplines, this might me a more manageable alternative.

Appendix A--Self Study Table of Contents

Indiana University of Pennsylvania College of Education and Educational Technology Department of Communications Media 1995-2005 Self Study Volume 2: Supporting Documentation

Orientation to the Self Study

1. Discussion of Methodology

* A detailed description of the process the co-chairs and the research/writing associate conducted for the Self Study

2. Primary Questions from the Department & Primary Questions for Evaluators

* The Self-study revolves around primary questions for the department and evaluators. This section has all questions available for review. These questions were approved by the Department and the Dean. The final Self-study report "Volume i: Abstract, Action Plan & Discussion" (to be submitted in early May, 2005) will be written to address these questions.

3. Goals Set During Last Review and Progress in Meeting those Goals

* The Department has had Self-studies in 1985 and 1995. The Chair of the Department was interviewed as to the status of the primary goal statements resulting from the 1995 Self-study.

Department Overview

4. Mission Statements (SSHE, IUP, COE&ET, COMM)

* All four cascading mission statements are provided. By reviewing this section, the Department can be found to be supportive of the primary missions of the College, the University, and the SSHE system.

5. Organizational Chart: Communications Media Department within the University

* The university is broken into nine colleges, which are all supported by an administrative system. This chart diagrams the reporting relationships and emphasizes the position of the Communications Media Department.

6. History of the Communications Media Department

* Most recently, the Department has tried to reconstruct its 50-year history. Reviewing this section provides an overview and historical context. Written by the Department Chair with input and review by Professor Emeritus X.

7. Faculty Retreat Minutes: September 11, 2003

* Faculty members had an extensive two-day retreat within the last year to discuss issues and opportunities. This section provides the minutes from that meeting.

Resources

8. Facilities Descriptions: Department and Other Support Environments

* The Department has been able to evolve unique support facilities for the offering of its undergraduate program and co-curricular activities. An overview is provided in this section of these facilities dedicated solely to the Department or facilities that are University resources significantly used by our program. These facilities represent some of the more complex technology facilities supported within the University.

9. Computer Lab Software

* With technology changing rapidly, it is important for the department to keep up with the trends and have extensive and updated software in its main computer labs. Stouffer G16 and G12, and Davis 109 and 127 are featured in this appendix.

10. Department Direct Budget (2000-2004)

* The operating budget of the Communications Media department is determined every year by the administration. However, this chart provided by the Associate Dean of the College of Education and Educational Technology's secretary, reflects only part of the operating funds. Additional monies may include grants, fees for services, on-air advertising or under writing, dispersed technology fees, etc. Lastly, a chart is provided by the IUP library estimating supportive library expenditures since 1988.

Faculty: Self-Reported Data--Quantitative

11. Faculty Narrative Resumes (12 Faculty)

* Each member of the faculty provided a brief narrative summarizing their background and career.

12. Snyder Data Analysis for the Communications Media Department

* All faculty members are required each semester to self report work load information. The Snyder report has been available online since 2000. This section has a blank Snyder report which helps define the categories. Also in this section is a self explanatory summary spread sheet of data since 2000 provided to the Department.

Faculty: Reflective Data--Qualitative

13. Five Points of Pride of Individual Faculty

* Faculty members were asked to provide five statements regarding their personal pride, given the 1995-2004 period. It should be noted that some of the more recent faculty members could only reflect on one semester. These statements are provided unedited for each faculty member.

14. Five Points of Pride about the Department by Faculty

* Faculty members were asked to provide five statements of pride about the Department, given the 1995-2004 period. These statements are provided unedited for each faculty member.

15. Challenges the Department Needs to overcome

* The faculty members were asked to provide three statements of concern. These concerns could either be focused on Department issues, personal-growth issues, or issues within the institution. These statements are provided unedited for each faculty member.

16. Faculty Input on Internal or External Forces affecting Department Mission

* The Department Chair interviewed each faculty member individually to determine what forces internal or external inhibit the Department from accomplishing its mission. This appendix is the final report.

Quantitative Data: Provided by the Administration

17. Trendbook Data on Communications Media Department (1999-2003)

* This data provided by The Chancellor's Office highlights quantitative notations on number of majors, ethnicity, gender, credit-load production, etc.

18. Class Size Comparison by Level (Fall 2004)

* The Communications Media department is one of the largest departments on the IUP campus. This comparison, provided by The Office of the Vice Provost, shows our class sizes by course level (100, 200, 300, and 400) as compared to other departments.

19. Major to Faculty FTE Comparison (Spring 2004 & Fall 2004)

* The number of majors in each department within the University is compared to the FTE of the Communications Media Department (provided The office of the Vice Provost).

20. Enrollment and Graduate Counts (1995-2005)

* Student enrollment has had a steady increase given trend data for the Department. These data, provided by The Office of the Vice Provost, show how many students are enrolled in the department and how many are granted degrees within a particular year. Lastly, the Associate Dean of the College of Education and Educational Technology, provided estimations of Communications Media majors who were on probation, extended probation, or dismissed (2001-2004).

21. Generated Credits (1995-2005)

* Recent changes in system and university budgeting emphasizes credits generated. These data, provided again by the Office of the Vice Provost, compare the Department to other university departments in regards to credit generation.

22. Communications Media Program Review Data (2000-2005)

* The Office of the Vice Provost provided these data in late April. It is simply a compilation of the Trendbook data, CCAR reports, and other data sets.

Curriculum

23. Counseling Sheet: Communications Media Advising System

* Each student in the major is required to fill out a counseling sheet every semester which represents their academic progress. One side of the counseling sheet is for course identification for the major (left side) and for liberal studies requirements (right side). Courses that students are required to take are typed into each designated space. The student, with their advisor's counsel, then fills in the selected courses as they progress. The second side of the counseling form has evolved with continuing research by the Department. Typical questions are addressed along with special needs different students may need to know in fulfilling a Bachelor of Science Degree in Communications Media. Lastly, individual advising load is provided for the most current two semesters as complied by Department records.

24. Areas of Professional Interest by Entry Level Students

* During the freshman or first transferred year of our majors, students take a core-required course (COMM 150--Aesthetics and Theory of Communications Media). Students enrolled in this course in the spring of 2005 were surveyed given their perceived career path. This section reports the findings of that survey.

25. international Experience for Communications Media Students

* IUP is a unique university because it offers many diverse opportunities for students. Communications Media students have taken part in several international and nation exchange programs. A sampling from the 2002-2004 academic years is highlighted.

26. COMM 150 Demographic Survey (3 Admissions Questions)

* Every year, Communications Media freshman and sophomores in COMM 150, the second class in the sequence of Communications Media courses, are given a demographic survey. The selected data presented in this appendix are whether or not IUP was their first choice, and why or why not.

27. Curriculum Comparison: IUP to Selection Institutions

* Communications Media students have several institutional options in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvanian. The IUP Communications Media program has identified four institutions as options students consider. The data presents a curriculum comparison between IUP Communications Media and the four institutions considered by students who ultimately chose our program and university.

Outcomes

28. Student Outcomes: Internship Grades from 1995-2005

* The Department has a core-requirement of a culminating Internship experience. This experience best represents the primary curricular outcome. This section reports student enrollment and subsequent final internship grades. it should be noted that final internship grades are determined by recommendations by the host supervisor (50%), a final comprehensive project graded by the assigned faculty member (35%) and a grade assigned by the faculty member for visitations at students' internship sites and other forms of professional communications (15%).

29. Internship Performance Review Data

* Each student in required to take an internship as their culminating activity through the department. This quantitative study is a comparison of the final Internship Performance Reviews given to the students by their host supervisors at the end of their internship experience. Two data sets are presented: the first represents all student interns; the second a subset of the few students achieved B+ or lower for a final grade. Lastly, 17 host supervisors provided constructive comments to the Department to consider.

30. Student Outcomes: Summary of Comments--Internship Performance Review

* This section provides a qualitative analysis of the open-ended comments provided on the internship performance review form (1995-2004). The presentation includes bar graphs, highlighting both positive and constructive suggestions regarding the individual intern or comments towards the Communications Media Department.

31. Alumni Places of Employment: A Sampling

* This section provides a brief sampling of alumni places of employment.

32. Alumni Survey Data

* A survey instrument developed by the department was sent out to 1018 Communications Media Alumni in mid-February. Out of the1018, 292 were sent back because of invalid email addresses, making the total received by alumni 718. These comprehensive data are the results of the 184 responses (26%) received and are broken down into 13 charts and 3 open-ended comments sheets.

Evaluators

33. External Evaluators Report (March 25, 2005) and their Credentials

* The external evaluators visited the Communications Media Department March 20 23, 2005. During their visit they met with faculty, administration, students, and alumni.

34. internal Evaluators Report

* Two professors from IUP served as internal evaluators to the Department. Their visitation took place on March 28 & 29, 2005.

Appendix B -Primary Questions: Self-Study

Department of Communications Media/COE&ET/IUP

1. Professional Undergraduate Curriculum within COMM

A. Given today's labor environment, are our undergraduate alumni competitive?

* What areas of the curriculum are most significant

* What curriculum areas need to be added or refocused

B. Given the findings above, what implications for curriculum change should be implemented?

2. Leadership and Citizenship Development within COMM

Are our undergraduate students receiving developmental skills within the Communications Media curriculum for:

* Critical Thinking

* Lifelong Learning

* Scientific Reasoning

* Aesthetic Appreciation

* Intellectual Creativity

* Information Literacy (accessing, evaluating, and using information; skill in determining which sources to consult)

* Systematic thinking

* Historical Perspective

* Ability to be resourceful, flexible, adaptable

* Ability to apply knowledge appropriately

* Reasoning (qualitative and quantitative)

* Communication (speaking, listening, writing, reading, visual, artistic)

3. Internal or External Forces Given COMM Mission

What internal or external forces add to or detract from the undergraduate mission of the Communications Media Department?

* What are the internal forces: strengths vs. limiters

* What are the external forces: strengths vs. limiters

* Given the findings above, what actions can be implemented to capitalize or minimize the strengths or limiters?

Primary Questions for Evaluators

External Evaluators:

1. Does the current curriculum offered by the Department of Communications Media sufficiently meet broadcasting and non-broadcasting environments given entry level positions of our undergraduates?

2. What is the vision of what broadcasting and non-broadcasting job market might be in ten years and how should the Department restructure to meet that vision?

Internal Evaluators

1. Does the Communications faculty have good citizenship within the college, university, and community?

2. Given the needed resource to support the curriculum, what are the methods or procedures necessary to maximize or enhance the Departments current resource base?

3. What are the perceived advantages or limitations for the creation of a School of Communications, with the program having a central role?

Appendix C--Facilities Description (Example of one of eight)

Graphics

The G-16 Multimedia Graphics lab includes a class room facility with flat tables and the attached College of Education (COE) administrated computer lab. The lab is accessed from the classroom.

The G-16 classroom includes:

* 7 large flat tables capable of seating 26 students

* 1 instructors work station Dell Optiplex GX 260 512 mb Ram CD/RW and Zip 250, XP professional

* Proxima projection system

* Sharp VC--H993 VCR

* 2 Harmon Kardon speakers

* 2 Recotton Rf speakers

* 2 Epson 2580 photo scanners with 35 mm auto film loader

* 2 Dell Dimension XPST550 computers dedicated to the Epson 2580 scanners

The G-16 Multimedia Graphics lab includes:

* 1 instructors work station Dell Optiplex GX 260 512 mb Ram CD/RW and Zip 250, XP professional

* 22 student work station Dell Optiplex GX 260 512 mb Ram CD/RW and Zip 250, XP professional

* 1 NEC projection system

* 1 HP Laser Jet 8000N BW printer

* 2 Harmon Kardon speakers

* 1 HP Scan Jet 4200 C scanner

* 2 Visioneer one touch 8100 scanner

* 1 HP scan Jet 6200 C

All 24 computers have the following software:

* XP professional 5.1

* Macromedia fireworks MX

* Macromedia flash MX

* Macromedia Dreamweaver MX

* Macromedia Director MX 2004

* freehand 10

* Adobe illustrator 10

* Adobe Photoshop7

* Quark X Press 5.0

* Authorware 6.0

* Microsoft Office Professional 2003 (PowerPoint)

The G-16 Multimedia Graphics Lab has emerged as the support facility for several growing facets of the program. 5 instructors teach as many as 11 sections of computer dependent courses in one semester.

Appendix D--Five Points of Pride of the Faculty (Example of one of 12)

Professor X

* Many of the students with which i work look to me as a mentor

* I have maintained a professional link outside the classroom which gives a sense of reality and immediacy to my teaching.

* I am able to bring a different point of view to departmental discourse

* I have remained active enough both creatively and through conventional scholarly endeavors to continue having Doctoral/Master's teaching status.

* I am able to teach many different types of courses.

* service activities are important, numerous, and strong.

Appendix E--Five Points of Pride of the Department by Faculty (Example of one of 12)

Professor Y

* We have teachers who are dedicated to helping citizens of Pennsylvania become educated and employable.

* We have a department that puts our students first above all other responsibilities.

* We have a curriculum that is both applied and theoretical. That is, we not only have students who leave our program with theory but also important design and production skills in relative and up-to-date media.

* We have a faculty who truly advise our students and help young people become professional and good citizens.

* We have an internship opportunity that is second to none. from the preparation that students receive while in the program, to the capstone course called Career Planning to the supervision we give those students while in the field.

Appendix F--Challenges the Department Needs to Overcome (Example of one of 12)

Professor Z

* The inability of the University to reallocate resources to successful Department programs in a timely fashion (additional faculty compliments, enhanced facility and equipment support, graduate assistantships and student payroll)

* The on-going administrative efforts to lengthen the time for faculty for sabbaticals or to achieve salary security in a more timely fashion (increase of salary steps) and reduce benefits (making the system less appealing for faculty recruitment and retention)

* The layers of additional faculty work without initial consultation, analysis of impact, or appropriation of support help (example: banner system, online forms, midterm grades, outcome matrices, etc.)
Appendix G--Advisee Assignment within the Department

NUMBER OF ADVISEES PER
PROFESSORS--SPRING 2005

Professor 1    33
Professor 2    53
Professor 3    33
Professor 4    32
Professor 5    33   Range= 32 to 72
Professor 6    72   Average= 41
Professor 7    45
Professor 8    43

Professor 9    33
Professor 10   36
Professor 11   35
Professor 12   44

NUMBER OF ADVISEES PER
PROFESSORS--FALL 2004

Professor 1    39
Professor 2    51
Professor 3    36
Professor 4    36
Professor 5    30   Range= 30 to 71
Professor 6    71   Average=43
Professor 7    48
Professor 8    49
Professor 9    39
Professor 10   41
Professor 11   42
Professor 12   45

Appendix H--Areas of Professional Interest by
Communications Media Entry Level Students

Promotions                 15%
Motion Pictures            17%
Advertising                11%
Game Development            3%
Television                 19%
Photography                 5%
Radio                      15%
Training                    3%
Audio                       4%
Graphics                    7%
Other                       1%

This data was gathered from 209 Freshman Communications Media students
in COMM 150. Students fill out a demographic survey as one of their
assignments, and are required to identify the area of the
Communications Media major they would like to concentrate.

Note: Table made from pie chart.

Appendix I--Primary Concentrations of Communications Media Alumni
1980-2004

Audio                      1%
Graphics                   3%
Motion Pictures            4%
Promotions                 5%
Radio                     14%
Still Photography          9%
Television                22%
Training                  19%
Video                     13%
Web Design                 1%
Advertising                9%

Note: Table made from pie chart.


Appendix J--Alumni Places of Employment

Broadcasting

E! Networks

Forever Broadcasting

FOX 8--WWCP / WATM

23

Froggy 98.3

Pittsburgh Oldies Network Showtime

Steel City Media

WJAC-TV

WMPT / FOX 43 News at Ten

WXDX-FM

WYLN 35

WZPT

Corporate

170 Systems

AdNet

Advanticom, Inc.

Allstate Insurance

Company

AT&T Broadband

Burt Hill Kosar

Rittelmann Associates

Cigna

Component Graphics, Inc.

Course Technology

Designing Solutions

Dunes Realty

Edelman

Elias-Savion Advertising

Entrepreneurs and

Consultants International

Gap, Inc.

HLG Marketing

IKEA Pennsylvania, L.P.

Kronos, Inc.

Landmarks Marketing Group

Marconi Services

Mid-States Sales and Marketing

Mountain View Inn

Mountaintop Technologies

Nike, Inc.

O'Brien Et. Al.

Penn Stainless Products, Inc.

Pennsylvania Department of Transportation

Philadelphia Health

Management Corporation

Playboy Enterprises, Inc.

PowerTrain

Sprint

The Forum Corporation

Training and Communications Group, Inc.

Training Solutions Plus

Non-Profit / Fine Arts

American Association for Cancer Research

Baltimore Area

Convention and Visitors Association

Ben Franklin Technology Partner's

Boy Scouts of America

Country Music Hall of Fame

Delaware County

Community Centers

Entertainment Alliance for Senior Involvement

Greater Johnstown /

Cambria County Chamber of Commerce

Manchester Craftsman's Guild

Susquehanna Township

Technology Department

U.S. Chamber of Commerce

Video / Multimedia

Fishtank Creative

Flashpoint Digital Media

JPL Productions

Pennsylvania Film Office

Pittsburgh Community

Television Corporation

PR Newswire

QMultimedia

Stargate

Education

Changchun Teacher's College

Greater Latrobe School District

Indiana University of Pennsylvania

Pressley Ridge Day School

The Art Institute of Ft. Lauderdale

William Paterson University

Publications

Virginia Gazette

Photography

Germain Watkins

Military

82nd Airborne, HHC Division

Talon Publication
Appendix K--Annual Income of First Job in Communication Media According
to Alumni

Entry Annual Salary in Thousands of Dollars

Number of Alumni     Total N = 184

NA                       38
more 40                   7
35-40                     3
30-35                     9
25-30                    18
20-25                    26
15-20                    47
less than 15             36

Note: Table made from bar graph.

Appendix L--Curriculum Comparison (Example)

Courses Offered at IUP              IUP   Univ. X    Univ. Y

Intro to Comm Media (101)           X     X (100)    X (100)
Digital Instructional Tech (103)    X
Aesthetics & Theory (150)           X     X (170)    X (337)
Internet and Multimedia (201)       X     X (444)

Media Presentation Skills (205)     X     X (239)
Issues in International             X     X (475)    X (410)
  Communication (230)
Communications Graphics (240)       X                X (283)
  Basic Audio Recording (249)

Television Production (251)         X     X (351)    X (242)
Beginning Photography (271)         X     X (375)    X (469)
Special Topics (281)                X                X (197)
Research in Communications          X     X (320)    X (300h)
  Media (302)

Scriptwriting (303)                 X      X (140)   X (346)
Electronic Media Programming        X
  and Sales (305)
Instructional Design for Training
  and Development (330)             X
Communications Consulting &
  Project Management (335)          X

Advanced Communications             X
  Graphics (340)
Television Criticism (345)          X
Radio Production (349)              X
Advanced Video Production (351)     X                X (342)

Broadcast Regulation (354)          X     X (422)    X (403)
Photography 2: the Print (371)      X
Mass Media & Behavior (375)         X
The History of African Americans    X
  in Films (380)

Practicum in Communications (390)   X
Career Planning in                  X     X (340)    X (160)
Broadcast Newswriting (403)
Process of Digital Game             X
  Development (405)

Media Field Studies (408)           X     X (471)
Multimedia Production (440)         X                X (270)
Animation (447)                     X     X ( * )    X (250)
Applications & Techniques of
  Motion Pictures (445)

Advanced Audio Recording            X     X (310)    X (448)
  Techniques (449)
Broadcast News Process (451)        X     X (324)    X (360)
Emerging Trends in Communication    X                X (484)
  Technology (460)
Management Practices in             X                X (489)
  Electronic Communications (470)

Electronic Imaging (471)            X                X (493)
Documentary Photography (474)
Senior Portfolio
  Presentation (475)
Senior Seminar in Communications
  Media (480)

Women in the Media (481)            X     X (499)    X (205)
Internship (493)                    X     X (482)    X (495)

(*) number not identified


Appendix M--External Evaluator's Recommendations (Example of two of 11 recommendations)

* Change the video editing platform. We recognize that the Department has recently made a major investment in a PC based video editing program. It appears that the industry is rapidly moving away from the large proprietary editing systems made by Avid and Media 100. The availability of sophisticated desktop (and laptop) editing programs will transform editing into a cottage industry. Virtually anybody with a computer and a digital video camera will be able to do professional quality editing. The standard is moving toward the highly regarded Apple Final Cut Pro program. IUP should provide access to this program for students.

* Communication is the basis of everything done in the Department. We would strongly recommend that an increased emphasis be placed on writing and speech. The move towards cottage industry video production underscores the need for individual graduates to be skilled "story-tellers." Courses in these areas aren't "sexy" for students, but as they get into the job market they will quickly value the importance placed on strong writing and speaking skills at IUP.

Dr. Richard Lamberski

Dr. Kurt Dudt

Craig Olear

Jennifer Forrest

Department of Communications Media

Indiana University of Pennsylvania

Dr. Richard Lamberski is a Professor in the IUP Department of Communications Media.

Dr. Kurt Dudt is a Professor and Department Chair in the IUP Department of Communications Media.

Craig Olear is a Doctoral Student in the IUP Department of Communications Media.

Jennifer Forrest is a Doctoral Candidate in the IUP Department of Communications Media.

NOTE: The authors wish to recognize Emily Jaros-Smith, who at the time of the Self-Study was a Master's Candidate and a Graduate Assistant--IUP/AECT. Emily worked with the Self-Study Co-Chairs throughout the process.
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Title Annotation:Proceedings of the Second Annual Laurel Highlands Communications Conference
Author:Lamberski, Richard; Dudt, Kurt; Olear, Craig; Forrest, Jennifer
Publication:The Proceedings of the Laurel Highlands Communications Conference
Article Type:Report
Geographic Code:1USA
Date:Jan 1, 2010
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