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Heat.

Heat (Warner Brothers, 1995). Michael Mann's thriller about a chess match between the chief of a robbery/homicide squad and the head of a team of professional bank robbers moves through the L.A. landscape like a train wreck and leaves as many bodies in its wake.

Obsessed cop Al Pacino is more interested in bagging thieves than saving his third marriage, while master thief Robert De Niro is just about to forget the one rule that's always kept him safe--never form attachments.

The result is a cat-and-mouse game between cop and robber with enough chemistry and competition to blow the doors off a bank vault. *** 1/2
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Title Annotation:McCormick's Quick Takes On Heist Movies
Publication:U.S. Catholic
Article Type:Movie Review
Date:Sep 1, 2003
Words:108
Previous Article:Heist.
Next Article:Make room for silence: let's rediscover our traditions of silence, contemplation, and sitting alone in the dark.


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