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Haven't we seen ewe somewhere re befo fore re? e? 20 YEARS AGO. DOLLY THE SHEEP BECAME THE WORLD'S FIRST CLONED ANIMAL MARION MCMULLEN CHECKS OUT THE MENAGERIE OF CATS, DOGS, HORSES, PIGLETS, CALVES AND RATS THAT HAVE FOLLOWED.

TAst mI cpCI back in 1996 when they announced they had cloned a mammal from an adult cell - a world first.

Dolly was an exact genetic duplicate of the six-year-old Finn Dorset white sheep who provided the original cell and Dolly went on to have several lambs of her own before her death in 2003.

Eattention TWO calves called George and Charlie, above, were born in Texas T in 1998 and were created by combining cloning techniques with genetic engineering. The births were notable because they were seen as leading the way to the production of similar animals that produce large quantities of therapeutic human proteins in their milk.

George and Charlie were cloned by scientists at the University of Massachusetts from the cell of a cow foetus.

THE first cloned piglets were introduced to the world 16 years ago. Millie, Christa, Alexis, Carrel and Dotcom, right, were the result of nuclear transfer cloning using adult cells.

They were hailed as a breakthrough in the race to grow organs for transplant to humans in animals and were born in America at Blacksburg, Virginia, Scientists from PPL Therapeutics, which helped create Dolly the sheep, implanted the cloned piglet eggs in a sow.

A LITTER of piglets also made the headlines a year later when they were born with fluorescent snouts and trotters after they were given jellyfish genes at the University of Missouri. Four of the five piglets ended up with the colourful change while the fifth was born with a normal coloured nose and hooves.

NT-2 The yellow-nosed piglet was named NT-2, which sttood for nuclear transfer - the scientific name for the cloning process. The piglets were cloned using the same technique pioneered by the Dolly the sheep experts. The scientists in Missouri first injected genetic material containing the fluorescent jellyfish gene into pig cells grown in a laboratory. Nuclei from these cells was then placed inside donor pig eggs whose own DNA had been removed.

Five eggs were then implanted into the womb of a surrogate mother who later gave birth to the litter.

THE first cloned endangered species was a baby ox called Noah. He was born in 2001 at Advanced Cell Technology in Massachusetts, but sadly died from dysentery within 48 hours of his birth. Scientists said the death was unrelated to the cloning.

THE first cloned kitten was produced by scientists in Texas 14 T years ago. The researchers created the fluffy kitten, named Ccthe Kitten Cc, by taking a cell from an adult tortoiseshell female. They used the nuclear transfer technique and the cloned kitty was raised by a surrogate cat mother.

RALPH became the first cloned rat 13 years ago. The rodent lacked the endearing appeal of Dolly the sheep, but scientist said they expected rats to prove a highly useful tool for studying human diseases. They said rats provided an important animal model for researching human disorders such as high blood pressure, diabetes and neurological problems.

Ralph AMERICAN scientists cloned a member of the horse family for the first time in 2003. Idaho Gem the Mule was cloned by scientists at the University of Moscow in Idaho.

He was an identical genetic copy of his brother, who was a champion racing mule called Taz T and it led to speculation that cloning could eventually lead to a perfect copy of a thoroughbred horse.

SEOUL in South Korea has been leading the way in cloning pets Three female genetically identical Afghan hound clones called Bona, Peace and Hope, right, caused a media frenzy when they made their appearance on a lawn in front of the university's Veterinary School 10 years ago.

Hollywood pet owner Bernann McKinney, right, was all smiles in 2008 when she went to Seoul to pick up a clone of her late beloved former pitbull terrier and scientists also introduced cloned beagles Magic and Stem in 2009.

BRITA T IN'S first cloned dog was a dachshund puppy called mini Winnie. It weighed just over 1lb and was the subject of a Channel 4 documentary.

The puppy was copied from a 12-year-old pet called Winnie belonging to west London cook Rebecca Smith and was born after a PS60,000 test tube procedure in Seoul in 2014.

Winnie It followed a competition advertised in the UK offering the procedure free of charge.

CAPTION(S):

Professor Ian Wilmut at Edinburgh's Royal Musuem with "Dolly", who went on display after her death in 2003

NT-2

Cc the Kitten

Ralph

Winnie
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Title Annotation:Features
Publication:Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales)
Date:Jun 29, 2016
Words:745
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