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Hansa Medical's drug candidate IdeS sees positive results.

M2 PHARMA-August 3, 2017-Hansa Medical's drug candidate IdeS sees positive results

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Results from Hansa Medical's (STO: HMED) research into its experimental drug revealed that it allowed doctors to perform successful kidney transplants in 24 out of 25 patients who had a particularly high risk of organ rejection, Reuters reported on Thursday.

For people with end-stage renal disease, a donated kidney is the best treatment option. However, around 30% of those on transplant lists have antibodies that make them highly sensitive to donor organs.

Standard immunosuppressant drugs often don't work and there are currently no approved drugs for desensitisation. But Hansa believes its drug candidate IdeS has the potential to be the world's first. The drug is a bacterial enzyme that depletes antibodies, enabling patients to be desensitised so that they can receive a kidney that their bodies might otherwise have rejected.

The findings, reported in the New England Journal of Medicine, discussed the cases of 11 patients in Sweden and 14 in the US who received the drug candidate prior to transplantation. Although the kidneys were observed to work in all but one of the patients, the researchers noted that the results "should be interpreted cautiously" due to the small sample size.

Analyst at Rx Securities, Joseph Hedden, said initial results were expected in mid-2018 from a Phase II trial of IdeS. This could, he added, potentially pave the way for regulatory approval.

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Publication:M2 Pharma
Date:Aug 3, 2017
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