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Hands together teeth apart.

Summer evenings, when shadows grow long, when the grass has cooled, and the evening meal is complete the chime of a tiny bell sets children scrambling. Perhaps one toddler darts upstairs to comb through his dresser drawer for a hidden dollar, while another races her fingers around the sofa cushions, desperate to find a few forgotten coins. Others still grasp toy banks and jar open the manhole-like plug in the bottom to free what loose change has been saved. Parents holler their requests from reclined lawn chairs in the backyard for a "push-up" or "rocket pop" as children tear over hedges to reach the sidewalk in time. There, a boxy white truck, lit from within waits. The return home is leisurely and silent, fists filled with frozen delight. Hand-held desserts are one of the best parts of summer--when it's okay to eat with your hands.

Often thought of as a "no-no" in certain circles, eating with one's hands has certain advantages. For one, it allows the diner to place absolute attention on the food at hand. In fact for thousands of years it was thought ill-mannered to use utensils at all. The first prescribed book of manners dates to 2500 BC in an Egyptian manuscript known as the "Prisse Papyrus." The scroll sets in writing the proper behavior to be observed when in the company of superiors, spouses, or family. These same rules remained part of the etiquette of the Roman Empire. Some two thousand years later, in addition to guidelines on decorum, the Bible set specific protocol for preparing and consuming food. As Christianity became an intrinsic part of Europe during the Middle Ages, social behavior was strictly dictated. In the eleventh century, by decree of the church, all social classes were instructed to eat with their fingers--a person of proper stock would employ only three fingers, sparing the pinkie and ring finger. It was believed that "only human fingers, created by God, were worthy to touch God's bounty" (Panati 78). These rules prevailed until the 1600s when class wars in France gave reason for the nobility to distinguish themselves in social practices. Eating with one's hands became a peasant's manner. Italians may have made the fork, but it was French who made it fashionable.

Even today there are certain distinctions among diners, chefs, and foodies with regard to the proper etiquette of eating out. "We like people to have fun, but there is also a certain element of "savoir-vivre" we must maintain-part of which includes the use of silverware," comments Pastry Chef Eric Hubert of Jean Georges in New York City. "When it comes to desserts we try to match the dining experience; interesting but tasteful. Our guests shouldn't have to wear gloves to eat their dessert," Hubert laughs. He does concede that under the right circumstance, a hand-held dessert may be one of convenience, "I have done some hand-held desserts, but mostly for buffets, it suits the casual setting when guests may be on their feet or mingling." Though Hubert prefers a plated dessert, the hand-held desserts were right up Pastry Chef Wayne Brachman's alley. A self pro claimed flea market hound, Brachman scours the concrete fields of Manhattan for dusty cook books, little pink do-dads and pastel green thingamabobs; true relics of the 50s and 60s, a time when soda fountains and ice cream cones were all the rage. S'mores too, invented by the Girl Scouts in the 60s, were just another sample of the new area of carefree dining for life on the go. As a result, our food became mobile--especially dessert.

Ice Cream arrived in Europe during the thirteenth century via Marco Polo on his way home from the Orient. Though the Italians became masters immediately, it wasn't until the seventeenth century that the British enjoyed the frozen confection. By the nineteenth century Europe was crazy for frozen sweets. By the early 1800s an Ohio gentleman, Harry Burt placed his frozen concoction on a stick and called it a "Good Humor Ice Cream Sucker." He sold his treats to children from a large white truck that cruised local neighborhoods. After his death, the idea was franchised across the United States. At roughly the same time, in California, Frank Epperson accidentally froze a lemonade beverage resulting in what he called an Eppsicle--later called Popsicle (Mariani 201). In 1846 the first hand-cranked ice cream machine was made by Nancy Johnston, the dessert became a favorite summer past time in American households. In 1904, at the St. Louis Worlds Fair, the waffle grid crackers and scooped ice cream converged. Exactly how is unclear, nevertheless, the combo was a hit. Today frozen custard variations remain part of the social scene of summer. It is part of every evening stroll through the action of the town palazzo.

hubert

He has a reputation for infusing a clever twist to the classical French pastries of his native France. Though he has worked at restaurant Jean Georges for four years, every dessert menu for Pastry Chef Eric Hubert seems new. Signature desserts like chocloate cigars, Asian accented Szechuan peppercorn tuiles, caramelized milk sheets, and handmade lollipop, macaroon, and marshmallow mignardaises replace the guilt of dessert with delight. What motivates Hubert's sense of humor day in and day out in such an intense business? "We are a big, happy family." Hubert states. "We have fun. There is no yelling and we don't bring our problems to work. It is a brotherhood. A place where there is a never-ending list of things to learn. Of course there is pressure, but we learn how to become comfortable with our work."

Trained on both sides of the line. Hubert understands the natural progression of the diners' experience and makes it a point to evaluate the menus, both savory and sweet, so as not to repeat ingredients. Providing such exquisite desserts and service to match requires lengthy hours in the kitchen. Though Hubert spent several years on the hot line, he gladly swapped chef's knife for palate knife. "I like the pastry shop--it smells good," Hubert quips. Though he enjoys the benefits of his work, he insists on preparing most of his dessert components to best meet the demands of his guests. "People expect the pastry kitchen to provide everything; homemade cadies, ice cream, or a special dessert to satisfy a specific craying," Hubert reasons. "We could work twelve hours a day and provide standard desserts, but we work fifteen and sixteen hour days to prepare everything from scratch. We want to respond to the needs of our clients." Finding employees with this same sense of commitment is more difficult than preparing the daily miseon place. Hubert believes the interview process is more a matter of evaluating an applicants motivation than analyzing his work experience. "I don't hire people according to their resume's. I look for cooks who are willing to invest their time and work for free. Inevitably those are the people who get the job and up staying." Hubert believes that teaching and exacting the chef's mission is a matter of leading by example.

The philosophy of the restaurant comes straight from the chef's mouth Hubert insists, "Jean Georges never says 'no.' I also feel bad saying 'no.' It's not what people want to hear," Hubert stresses that a cook must never lose sight of why he is in the kitche. "The guest is the star of the night. We are honored to have them."

brachman

His sense of humor and intellect read loud and clear in his writing; a talent he frequently shares with Chocolatier, Food Arts, and Time Out. Penning a four-hundred word magazine article is barely enough to satisfy the ideas, which swirl through the head of a geologist/classical record producer/punk rocker/performance artist/pastry maestro. But, double graduate degrees aside, "literary whiz" may soon be added to Pastry Chef Wayne Harley Brachman's list of titles. His latest effort, Retro Desserts (William Morrow & Co. 2000) not only provides swell memorabilia for the tongue but relays neat-o stories of culinary Americana.

A self-taught pastry chef, Brachman has sweetened the menus at Odeon and Arizona 206, but he made his most indelible mark at the Mesa Grill and Bolo. Today he is part of the team at The Glazier Group. As Executive Pastry Chef of Tapika's Southwester cuisine and the no-nonsense menus at the carnivorous Michael Jordan Steak House and the Strip House, Brachman has found a home for his personal spin on the world of desserts. "When everything started going the way of the tuile in the late 1980s and early 1990s I focused more on the retro desserts," Brachman retraces, "Plated dessers, sauce painting and pulled sugar became the norm, but the garnishes were barely edible. I hated it. The hook with desserts is you want them to be frivolous but also delicious. Other pastry chefs like Gale Gand and Claudia Fleming, were also doing deja vu desserts--the foods of our youth." As Brachman recalls, the style was a sort of reverence to American food, food of the 50s, 60s and 70s: fluffy pink cakes that looked great but didn't taste that great were modernized by updating the flavors. Though food coloring ran rampant in the middle of the century. Brachman's colors are very "p.c." Brachman maintains, "All the colors in my food are natural. In fact it's kind of funny that the natural colors are more techno than the artificial colors." To achieve such glowing hues. Brachman makes a variety of herbal extracts in which a sugar syrup and herbs are blended to produce a vibrant ingredient. "Just as form follows function; color follows flavor," Brachman explains. In addition to his steadfast use of natural color, Brachman has strong opinions about the beverages that accompany his desserts; "I believe dessert wines, Ports, and Madeiras are best after dessert, otherwise there is too much competition. In general, my favorite beverage with American desserts is a single barrel bourbon; Bookers Knob Creek for something sweeter, or Van Winkle for middle of the road sweetness-I wouldn't knock Hancock's Reserve out of bed either." Though decisive in his own cooking, Brachman's theme in his books and on his TV Food Network shows are decidedly fun.

Frozen Fruit Slices

hubert

(Serves 6)

For the cantaloupe sorbet:

1 cantaloupe, halved, seeded, fruit removed and reserved

1 pound white chocolate, melted

1 drop green food coloring

5 1/2 ounces granulated sugar Juice of 1 lemon

1 sheet gelatin, melted in 1 cup cold water

For the blood orange sorbet:

2 cups blood orange juice

23/4 ounces granulated sugar

1/2 sheet gelatin, melted in

1/2 cup cold water

For the lemon sorbet:

3 ounces granulated sugar

3 ounces water

2 cups lemon juice

1/2 sheet gelatin, melted in

1/2 cup hot water

For the blood orange slices:

2 blood oranges, each out into 6 round slices and pulp discarded

2 quarts water

35 ounces granulated sugar

For the lemon slices:

3 lemons, each cut into 6 round slices and pulp discarded

2 quarts water

35 ounces granulated sugar

For the pepino melon:

3 pepino melons, each cut into

6 wedges, flesh removed and discarded [*]

Reserved cantaloupe sorbet

For the garnish:

Chocolate chips

Pine nuts

Pistachio nuts

(*.)Availble through The Chef's Garden at (800) 289-4644.

For the cantaloupe sorbet, line the cantaloupe rind with plastic wrap. Place 1/4 cup of the melted chocolate in a small bowl, add the green food coloring, and mix to combine. Using a pastry brush, paint a decorative pattern on the inside of each cantaloupe with the green chocolate.

Set aside until dry, about 15 minutes. Coat the inside of each shell with white chocolate and set aside until dry, about 15 minutes. Repeat with the remaining white chocolate and set aside until dry, about 15 minutes. Gently remove the plastic wrap from the shell, transfer to a cut ting board. Unmold the chocolate and discard the plastic wrap. Using a hot knife, carefully slice each chocolate half into six wedges and set aside. In the bowl of a food processor fitted with the metal blade attachment, puree the cantaloupe pulp until smooth, about one minute. Strain through a fine mesh sieve and transfer to a large bowl. Add the sugar, lemon juice, and gelatin and whisk until combined, about one minute. Transfer the mixture to an ice cream machine and freeze according to the manufacturer's instructions.

For the blood orange sorbet, in a blender, combine all of the ingredients and blend until combined, about one minute. Transfer to an ice cream machine and freeze according to the manufacturer's instructions.

For the lemon sorbet, in a small, covered saucepan over medium heat, bring the sugar and water to a boil, reduce the heat, and simmer until the sugar is dissolved, about two minutes. Remove from the heat and set aside to cool. Add the lemon juice and gelatin and whisk to combine. Transfer to an ice cream machine and freeze according to the manufacturer's instructions.

For the blood orange slice, in a medium saucepan, bring the orange rinds, one quart of the water, and 17 ounces of the sugar to a boil. Reduce the heat, and simmer for five minutes. Remove from the heat and strain.

Repeat with the remaining water and sugar. Remove from the heat and set aside to cool. Strain through a fine mesh sieve and place the rinds on a parchment-lined sheet pan. Set aside in the freezer until firm, about one hour.

For the lemon slices, in a medium saucepan, bring the lemon rinds, one quart of the water, and 17 ounces of the sugar to a boil. Reduce the heat, and simmer for five minutes. Remove from the heat and strain. Repeat with remaining water and sugar. Remove from the heat and set aside to cool. Strain through a fine mesh sieve and place the rinds on a parchment-lined sheet pan. Set aside in the freezer until firm, about one hour.

To assemble the cantaloupe slices, arrange the chocolate shell slices on a sheet pan. Using the surface of the sheet pan and a palate knife as a guide, fill each shell with cantaloupe sorbet to resemble a wedge of cantaloupe. Arrange some chocolate chips on top of each slice to resemble seeds. Set aside in the freezer and reserve the remaining sorbet.

To assemble the blood orange slices, arrange the orange rinds on a sheet pan. Using the surface of the sheet pan and a palate knife as a guide, fill each rind with blood orange sorbet to resemble a wedge of orange. Arrange some pine nuts on top of each slice to resemble seeds. Set aside in the freezer.

To assemble the lemon slices, arrange the lemon rinds on a sheet pan. Using the surface of the sheet pan and a palate knife as a guide, fill each rind with lemon sorbet to resemble a wedge of lemon. Arrange some pistachio nuts on top of each slice to resemble seeds. Set aside in the freezer.

To assemble the pepino melon, arrange the pepino rinds on a sheet pan. Using the surface of the sheet pan and a palate knife as a guide, fill each rind with cantaloupe sorbet to resemble a wedge of cantaloupe. Arrange some chocolate chips on top of each slice to resemble seeds. Set aside in the freezer.

To serve, arrange some cantaloupe slices, blood orange slices, lemon slices, and pepino melon slices on an ice block.

White Chocolate Ladyfinger Animals

hubert

(Serves 6)

For the ladyfinger cookies:

5 egg yolks

5 ounces granulated sugar

3 1/2 ounces all-purpose flour, sifted

5 egg whites

1/4 cup confectioners' sugar

For the white chocolate mousse:

1 pint heavy cream

2 ounces white chocolate, melted

For the opera glaze:

4 1/2 ounces semisweet chocolate, 66% cocoa fat

2 3/4 ounces milk chocolate

2 3/4 ounces unsalted butter

3/4 ounce molasses

1 3/4 ounces corn oil

3/4 ounces maple syrup

For the apricot glaze:

2 ounces granulated sugar

2 ounces water

16 ounces apricot glaze[*]

2 ounces Baileys [R] Irish Cream

2 kiwis, peeled and pureed

2 drops green food coloring

For the assembly:

4 drops red food coloring

1/2 ounce marzipan

1 ounce dark chocolate, melted

7 whole blanched almonds, sliced

1 ounce white chocolate, melted

For the garnish:

Green sugar bars

(*.) Available through Dairyland The Chefs' Warehouse at (718) 842-8700.

For the ladyfinger cookies, preheat the oven to 350 degrees. In the bowl of an electric mixer fitter with the whisk attachment, beat the egg yolks and three ounces of the sugar until lemon colored and thick, about two minutes. Add the flour and mix to combine, about one minute. Remove the bowl, transfer the batter to a medium bowl, ands et aside. In the bowl of an electric mixer fitter with the whisk. attachment, beat the egg whites to form soft peaks. Add the remaining sugar and whip to form stiff peaks. Remove the bowl from the mixer and fold the egg whites into the flour mixture until just combined. Transfer the mixture to a pastry bag fitted with a medium round tip. Pipe eight circles and 13 teardrop shapes onto a parchment-lined sheet pan. Sprinkle with the powdered sugar and place in the oven to bake for five minutes. Remove from the heat and set aside to cool.

For the white chocolate mousse, in the bowl of an electric mixer fitter with the whisk attachment, beat the heavy cream to form soft peaks. Add the melted chocolate and beat on high speed to form stiff peaks. Transfer the mousse to a pastry bag fitted with a small round tip and set aside.

For the opera glaze, bring a saucepan of water to a boil and remove from the heat. Place the semisweet chocolate, milk chocolate, and butter in a medium bowl, cover with plastic wrap, and place over the hot water until soft, about five minutes. Add the molasses, corn oil, and maple syrup and, using a rubber spatula, gently stir to combine. Remove from the heat and set aside to cool.

For the apricot glaze, in a small, covered saucepan, bring the sugar and water to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer for two minutes. Remove from the heat and set aside to cool. Transfer the mixture to a medium bowl, add the apricot glaze and Bailey's and mix to combine. Divide between three bowls. Add the kiwi puree and food coloring to one bowl and mix to combine.

To assemble, place the ladyfinger cookies on a parchment-lined sheet pan and pipe some white chocolate mousse onto each. Place in the freezer until well chilled, about 30 minutes. Dip the round cookies into the kiwi-apricot glaze. Dip the remaining teardrop cookies into the plain apricot glaze. Dip the remaining teardrop cookies into the opera glaze. Set aside in the refrigerator until set, about one hour.

To finish the frogs, using a sharp paring knife, make a small cut in the top of the eight kiwi-apricot glazed mousse cookies and color with the red food coloring to make the mouth. Transfer to a parchment-lined sheet pan and set aside in the refrigerator.

To finish the rabbits, roll the marzipan to form six rabbit tails and six rabbit heads and ears. Place the marzipan pieces on six apricot glazed mousse cookies. Place the melted dark chocolate into a paper cone and pipe "eyes" on the rabbit heads. Transfer to a parchment-lined sheet pan and set aside in the refrigerator.

To finish the mice, arrange the almond slices in seven opera glazed cookies to form "ears." Place the melted white chocolate in a paper cone and pipe "eyes" and "tails" onto the mice. Place on a parchment-lined sheet pan and set aside in the refrigerator.

To serve, arrange some rabbits, mice, and frogs onto the sugar bars.

Tropical Sorbets and Ice Cream with Flavored Cones

Eric Hubert

(Serves 6)

For the mango sorbet:

1/3 cup granulated sugar

1/3 cup water

2 pounds mango puree

Juice of 1 lemon

1 sheet gelatin, melted in 1 cup cold water

For the peach sorbet:

2 pounds peach puree

5 1/2 ounces granulated sugar

Juice of 1 lemon

1 sheet gelatin, melted in 1 cup cold water

For the mint ice cream:

2 cups heavy cream

1 cup whole milk

3 1/2 ounces granulated sugar

5 egg yolks

1/2 bunch mint, stemmed

1/2 cup semisweet chocolate, minced

For the coconut sorbet:

2 pounds coconut milk

1 cup half and half

7 ounces granulated sugar

3 tablespoons Malibu[R] rum

For the cherry sorbet:

1 pound Bing cherries, pitted

1 pound sour cherries, pitted

7 ounces granulated sugar

3 tablespoons Creame de Cassis

For the raspberry cones:

3/4 cup confectioners' sugar

1/4 cup all-purpose flour

3 tablespoons raspberry puree

1 tablespoon unsalted butter melted

For the pepper cones:

1/2 cup brown sugar

1/3 cup all-purpose flour

1 teaspoon cracked black peppercorns

1 teaspoon cracked Szechuan peppercorns

2 tablespoons unsalted butter melted

1/3 cup coconut milk

For the passion fruit cones

1/2 cup confectioners sugar

1/2 cup all-purpose flour

2 tablespoons passion fruit juice

1 tablespoon unsalted butter, melted

For the coconut-lime cones:

1 tablespoon lime zest

1/2 cup water

1/2 cup granulated sugar

1/3 cup all-purpose flour

1/2 cup brown sugar

1/3 cup coconut milk

2 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted

For the mango sorbet, in a small covered saucepan, bring the sugar and water to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer until the sugar is dissolved, about two minutes. Remove from the heat and set aside to cool. In a commercial blender, puree the sugar syrup, mango puree, lemon juice, and gelatin until smooth and well combined, about one minute. Transfer the mixture to an ice cream machine and freeze according to the manufacturer's instructions.

Reserve in the freezer

For the peach sorbet in a commercial blender combine all of the ingredients and blend until smooth and well combined about one minute. Transfer the mixture to an ice cream machine and freeze according to the manufacturer's instructions. Reserve in the freezer.

For the mint ice cream in a medium saucepan bring the cream and milk to a boil. Reduce the heat and maintain at a simmer In a medium bowl combine the sugar and egg yolks, and whisk until smooth Temper the egg yolks, adding one-third of the hot cream while whisking constantly. Whisk the tempered yolks into the hot cream and place over medium heat stirring constantly with a wooden spoon. When the mixture thickens enough to coat the back of the spoon remove from the heat and strain through a fine mesh sieve. Set aside in an ice bath until chilled. In a commercial blender puree the cream and the mint leaves until smooth and well combined about two minutes. Transfer to an ice-cream machine and freeze according to the manufacturer's instructions. Add the chocolate stir to combine and reserve in the freezer

For the coconut sorbet, in a medium bowl, combine all of the ingredients and whisk to combine. Transfer the mixture to an ice cream machine and freeze according to the manufacturer's instructions. Reserve in the freezer.

For the cherry sorbet, in the bowl of a food processor fitted with the metal blade attachment, puree the cherries and the sugar until smooth and well combined, about two minutes. Strain through a fine mesh sieve and transfer to a bowl. Add the Creme de Cassis and stir to combine. Transfer the mixture to an ice cream machine and freeze according to the manufacturer's instructions. Reserve in the freezer.

For the raspberry cones, preheat the oven to 300 degrees. In a medium bowl, combine all of the ingredients and mix to combine. Using a teaspoon, spoon 12 rounds onto a silpat-lined sheet pan and, using an offset spatula, spread the batter thin. Place in the oven and bake until lacy, about seven minutes. Remove from the heat and quickly roll to form a cone shape. Place on a parchment-lined sheet pan and set aside.

For the pepper cones, preheat the oven to 300 degrees. In a medium bowl, combine all of the ingredients and mix to combine. Using a teaspoon, spoon 12 rounds onto a silpat-lined sheet pan and, using an offset spatula, spread the batter thin. Place in the oven and bake until lacy, about seven minutes. Remove from the heat and quickly roll to form a cone shape. Place on a parchment-lined sheet pan and set aside.

For the passion fruit cones, preheat the oven to 300 degrees. In a medium bowl, combine all of the ingredients and mix to combine. Using a teaspoon, spoon 12 rounds onto a silpat-lined sheet pan and, using an offset spatula, spread the batter thin. Place in the oven and bake until lacy, about seven minutes. Remove from the heat and quickly roll to form a cone shape. Place on a parchment-lined sheet pan and set aside.

For the coconut-lime cones, pre-heat the oven to 300 degrees. Bring a small saucepan of water to a boil, reduce the heat, and maintain at a simmer. Add the lime zest and simmer for two minutes, remove from the heat, and strain. Repeat two more times and shock in an ice bath. Transfer to a paper towel-lined sheet pan to dry. In a medium, covered saucepan over medium-low heat, combine the blanched rinds, water, and sugar. Simmer until the zest is translucent and soft, about 10 minutes. Remove from the heat, strain through a fine mesh sieve, and set aside to cool. Place the zest in a medium bowl and add the flour, brown sugar, coconut milk, and butter and mix to combine. Using a teaspoon, spoon 12 rounds onto a silpat-lined sheet pan and, using an offset spatula, spread the batter thin. Place in the oven and bake until lacy, about seven minutes. Remove from the heat and quickly roll to form a cone shape. Place on a parchment-lined sheet pan and set aside.

To serve, in a cone holder, arrange the cones from left to right: raspberry, pepper, passion fruit, raspberry, and coconut-lime. Place a scoop of ice cream on top of each from left to right: mango, peach, mint, coconut, and cherry.

Candied Fruit-Pops

Eric Hubert

(Serves 6)

For the fruit:

1 pound granulated sugar

31/2 ounces water

11/2 ounces corn syrup

Section of 6 clementines

30 grapes

36 Bing cherries

1 pear, thinly sliced

12 strawberries, stemmed

1 small pineapple, cored, halved, and thinly sliced

6 finger bananas, peeled

For the lady apples:

1 pound granulated sugar

3 1/2 ounces water

1 1/2 ounces corn syrup

4 ounces unsalted butter, cubed 2 drops red food coloring 9 lady apples

For the cherry tomatoes:

1 pound granulated sugar

3 1/2 ounces water

1 1/2 ounces corn syrup

1 tablespoon cracked black pepper

6 cherry tomatoes

For the fruit in a small covered saucepan bring the sugar, water, and corn syrup to a boil Reduce the heat and simmer until golden brown. Remove from the heat and set aside. Dip the clementines and grapes into the syrup to coat. Using a slotted spoon transfer the clementines and grapes to a parchment-lined sheet pan. Skewer the remaining fruit and dip into the syrup to coat. Transfer to a parchment-lined sheet pan and set aside.

For the lady apples, in a small, covered saucepan, bring the sugar, water, and corn syrup to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer until golden brown.

Remove from the heat and set aside to cool slightly. Add the butter and food coloring, whisking constantly to combine. Remove from the heat and set aside. Slice three lady apples in half and skewer each half. Dip the skewered and whole lady apples in the caramel to coat. Transfer to a parchment-lined sheet pan and set aside.

For the cherry tomatoes, in a small covered saucepan, bring the sugar, water, and corn syrup to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer until golden brown. Remove from the heat and add the cracked black pepper: Skewer each cherry tomato and dip into the syrup to coat. Transfer to a perchment-lined

sheet pan and set aside.

To serve, arrange the candied fruit-pops and fruit in a decorative pattern.

Ice Cream Sandwiches

eric hubert

(Serves 6)

For the coconut sorbet:

32 ounces coconut milk

1 cup half and half

7 ounces granulated sugar

3 tablespoons Malibu rum

For the raspberry ice cream:

1/2 cup heavy cream

1/2 cup whole milk

1/2 vanilla bean split

1/4 cup granulated sugar

1 egg yolk

2 cups raspberry puree

For the vanilla ice cream:

1 cup heavy cream

1 cup whole milk

1/2 vanilla bean split

1/4 cup granulated sugar

3 egg yolks

For the mint ice cream:

2 cups heavy cream

1 cup whole milk

3 1/2 ounces granulated sugar

5 egg yolks

1/2 bunch mint stemmed

1/2 cup semisweet chocolate melted

For the simple syrup:

1/2 cup granulated sugar

1/2 cup water

For the banana ice cream:

1/2 cup heavy cream

1/2 cup whole milk

1/2 vanilla bean, split

1/4 cup granulated sugar

2 egg yolks

1/2 cup reserved simple syrup

3 1/2 cups banana puree

Juice of 1 lime

For the butter cookies:

23/4 pounds unsalted butter, softened

12 1/4 ounces confectioners' sugar

2 1/2 pounds all-purpose flour

15 1/2 ounces blanched almond flour

For the anise macaroons:

7 ounces egg whites

3 1/2 ounces granulated sugar

7 ounces blanched almond flour

15 1/2 ounces confectioners' sugar

2 ounces apricot glaze [*]

For the mint macaroons:

7 ounces egg whites

3 1/2 ounces granulated sugar

7 ounces blanched almond flour

15 1/2 ounces confectioners sugar

2 ounces apricot glaze [*]

2 drops green food coloring

2 drops mint extract

For the brownies:

10 1/2 ounces unsalted butter

21 ounces granulated sugar

1 3/4 ounces all-purpose flour

3 3/4 ounces cocoa powder

4 eggs

6 ounces bittersweet chocolate, 60% cocoa fat, melted

1/4 cup almonds, chopped

1/4 cup hazelnuts, chopped

1/4 cup walnuts, chopped

For the dish:

Confectioners' sugar

Available through Dairyland The Chefs Warehouse at (718) 842-8700.

For the coconut sorbet, in a medium bowl, combine all of the ingredients and whisk to combine. Transfer the mixture to an ice cream machine and freeze according to the manufacturer's instructions. Reserve in the freezer.

For the raspberry ice cream, in a medium saucepan, bring the cream, milk, and vanilla bean to a boil. Reduce the heat and maintain at a simmer. In a medium bowl, combine the sugar and egg yolk and whisk until smooth. Temper the egg yolk, adding one-third of the hot cream while whisking constantly. Whisk the tempered yolk into the hot cream and place over medium heat, stirring constantly with a wooden spoon. When the mixture thickens enough to coat the back of the spoon, remove from the heat and strain through a fine mesh sieve. Set aside in an ice bath until chilled, add the respberry puree, and freeze in an ice-cream machine according to the manufacturer's instructions. Reserve in the freezer.

For the vanilla ice cream, in a medium saucepan, bring the cream, milk, and vanilla bean to a boil. Reduce the heat and maintain at a simmer. In a medium bowl, combine the sugar and egg yolks and whisk until smooth. Temper the egg yolks, adding one-third of the hot cream while whisking constantly. Whisk the tempered yolks into the hot cream and place over medium heat, stir ring constantly with a wooden spoon. When the mixture thickens enough to coat the back of the yolks and whisk until smooth. spoon, remove from the heat and strain through a fine mesh sieve. Set aside in an ice bath until chilled and freeze in an ice-cream machine according to the manufacturer's instructions. Transfer to a pastry bag fitted with a medium star tip attachment and set aside in the freezer.

For the mint ice cream, in a medium saucepan, bring the cream and milk to a boil. Reduce the heat and maintain at a simmer. In a medium bowl, combine the sugar and egg yolks, and whisk until smooth.

Temper the egg yolks, adding one-third of the hot cream while whisking constantly. Whisk the tempered yolks into the hot cream and place over medium heat, stirring constantly with a wooden spoon. When the mixture thickens enough to coat the back of the spoon, remove from the heat and strain through a fine mesh sieve. Set aside in an ice bath until chilled. In a commercial blender, puree the cream and mint leaves until fine and well combined, about two minutes. Freeze in an ice-cream machine according to the manufacturer's instructions. Add the chocolate, stir to combine, and reserve in the freezer.

For the simple syrup, in a small, covered saucepan, bring the sugar and water to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer until the sugar is dissolved, about two minutes. Remove from the heat and set aside.

For the banana ice cream, in a medium saucepan, bring the cream, milk, and vanilla bean to a boil. Reduce the heat and maintain at a simmer. In a medium bowl, combine the sugar and egg yolks and whisk until smooth. Temper the egg yolks, adding one-third of the hot cream while whisking constantly. Whisk the tempered yolks into the hot cream and place over medium heat, stirring constantly with a wooden spoon. When the mixture thickens enough to coat the back of the spoon, remove from the heat, and strain through a fine mesh sieve. Transfer to a bowl, add the simple syrup, banana puree, and lime juice and whisk to combine. Set aside in an ice bath until chilled and freeze in an ice-cream machine according to the manufacturer's instructions. Reserve in the freezer.

For the butter cookies, preheat the oven to 325 degrees. In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, combine two pounds of the butter and sugar and mix until smooth and soft. Add the all-purpose flour, almond flour, and sugar in several stages, scraping down the sides of the bowl between each addition. Transfer the mixture to a parchment-lined sheet pan and spread to make an even layer. Place in the oven to bake until light brown, about 20 minutes. Remove from the heat and set aside until cool. Cut the cookies into small pieces and place in the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment. Add the remaining butter in several stages until a paste forms, about four minutes. Transfer the mixture to a parchment-lined sheet pan and sprinkle the top of the dough with water. Cover with plastic wrap and, using a rolling pin, roll until the dough is 1/2-inch thick. Place in the refrigerator to chill for three hours. Remove the plastic wrap and using a two-inch diamond shaped cutter, cut out 24 cookies. Place the cookies on a parchment-lined sheet pan and place in the oven to bake until golden brown, about 10 minutes. Remove from the heat and set aside to cool. Reserve in the freezer.

For the anise macaroons, preheat oven to 275 degrees. In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, beat the egg whites to form soft peaks. Add the granulated sugar and beat to form stiff peaks. In a medium bowl, combine the almond flour and the confectioners' sugar. Fold in the egg whites and apricot glaze and fold until just combined. Transfer to a pastry bag fitted with a medium round tip. Pipe 12 rounds onto a parchment-lined sheet pan and set aside until the top of the cookie is dry to the touch, about 30 minutes. Place in the oven until crisp, about 10 minutes. Remove from the heat and set aside to cool. Dust with confectioners' sugar and set aside.

For the mint macaroons, preheat oven to 275 degrees. In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, beat the egg whites to form soft peaks. Add the granulated sugar and beat to form stiff peaks. In a medium bowl, combine the almond flour and the confectioners' sugar. Fold in the egg whites, apricot glaze, food coloring and mint extract. Transfer to a pastry bag fitted with a medium round tip. Pipe 12 rounds onto a parchment-lined sheet pan and set aside until the top of the cookie is dry to the touch, about 30 minutes. Place in the oven until crisp, about 10 minutes. Remove from the heat and set aside to cool.

For the brownies, preheat the oven to 350 degrees. In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, beat the butter and sugar on high speed until soft and well combined. On a piece of parchment paper, sift together the flour and cocoa powder. Add the eggs, chocolate, and the flour to the butter in several stages, scraping down the sides of the bowl between each addition. Add the nuts and mix until just combined. Transfer the batter to a parchment-lined sheet pan and spread into an even layer. Place in the oven to bake for 20 minutes or until done. Remove from the heat and set aside to cool. Using a two-inch round cookie cutter, cut out 24 circles. Place on a parchment-lined sheet pan and set aside.

To assemble the sandwiches, arrange half the butter cookies, mint macaroons, anise macaroons, and brownies on a flat work surface. Spoon some coconut sorbet and rasp berry ice cream on the butter cookies, top with a butter cookie and dust with powdered sugar. Spoon some mint macaroons with mint ice cream and top with a mint macaroon. Spoon some banana ice cream onto the anise macaroons and top with an anise macaroon. Spoon some vanilla ice cream onto the brownies and top with the remaining brownies. Smooth the edges of each with an offset spatula and set aside in the freezer.

To serve, arrange some sandwiches on a carved block of ice.

Multicolor S'mores

hubert

(Serves 6)

For the rose marshmallows:

7 ounces granulated sugar

3 1/2 ounces corn syrup

1 cup water

5 sheets gelatin, softened in 5 cups of cold water

6 egg whites

2 tablespoons rose water [*]

3 drops red food coloring

1/4 cup potato starch

For the orange blossom marshmallows:

7 ounces granulated sugar

3 1/2 ounces corn syrup

1 cup water

5 sheets gelatin, softened in 5 cups of cold water

6 egg whites

2 tablespoons orange blossom water[*]

1 drop red food coloring

1 drop yellow food coloring

1/4 cup potato starch

For the elderberry marshmallows:

7 ounces granulated sugar

3 1/2 ounces corn syrup

1 cup water

5 sheets gelatin, softened in 5 cups of warm water

6 egg whites

2 drops elderberry extract [**]

1/4 cup potato starch

For the mint marshmallows:

7 ounces granulated sugar

3 1/2 ounces corn syrup

1 cup water

5 sheets gelatin softened in 5 cups of cold water

6 egg whites

2 drops mint extract

3 drops green food coloring

1/4 cup potato starch

For the white chocolate sauce:

2 ounces granulated sugar

3 1/2 ounces water

3 1/2 ounces diced pineapple

10 1/2 ounces white chocolate, melted

For the milk chocolate sauce:

1/2 ounce granulated sugar

3 1/2 ounces water

7 ounces milk chocolate, melted

12 1/2 ounces hazelnuts, toasted and ground to a fine paste

For the dark chocolate sauce:

1 1/2 ounces granulated sugar

5 1/2 ounces water

1 small orange, peeled and small diced

8 1/2 ounces dark chocolate, melted

For the dish: Graham crackers

(*.) Available through Baroody Improters Inc. at (973) 340-4832.

(**.)Available through NuNaturals at (800) 753-4372.

For the rose marshmallows, in a medium saucepan, bring the sugar, corn syrup, and water to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer until the mixture reaches 285 degrees. Remove from the heat and gradually add the gelatin, stirring constantly. Mix to combine and set aside. In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, beat the egg whites, rose water, and food coloring to medium peaks. On high speed, slowly add the sugar syrup and beat until well combined and cool, about 10 minutes. Remove the bowl from the mixer and pour the batter onto a plastic wrap-lined half sheet pan. Cover the mixture with plastic wrap and set aside until firm, about 30 minutes. Remove the top layer of plastic wrap and dust with the potato starch. Cover with a sheet pan and invert. Remove the plastic wrap and dust with potato starch. Cover with plastic wrap and set aside overnight. Transfer the marshmallows to a cutting board and discard the plastic wrap. Cut into 1 1/2-inch squares and set aside.

For the orange blossom marshmallows, in a medium saucepan, bring the sugar, corn syrup, and water to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer until the mixture reaches 285 degrees. Remove from the heat and gradually add the gelatin, stirring constantly. Mix to combine and set side. In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, beat the egg whites, orange blossom water, and food coloring to medium peaks. On high speed, slowly add the sugar syrup and beat until well combined and cool, about 10 minutes. Remove the bowl from the mixer and pour the batter onto a plastic wrap-lined half sheet pan. Cover the mixture with plastic wrap and set aside until firm, about 30 minutes. Remove the top layer of plastic wrap and dust with the potato starch. Cover with a sheet pan and invert. Remove the plastic wrap and dust with potato starch. Cover with plastic wrap and set aside overnight. Transfer the masrhmallows to a cutting board and discard the plastic wrap. Cut into 1-1/2 inch squares and set aside.

For the elderberry marshmallows, in a medium saucepan, bring the sugar, corn syrup, and water to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer until the mixture reaches 285 degrees. Remove from the heat and gradually add the gelatin, stirring constantly. Mix to combine and set side. In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, beat the egg whites and elderberry extract to medium peaks. On high speed, slowly add the sugar syrup and beat until well combined and cool, about 10 minutes. Remove the bowl from the mixer and pour the batter onto a plastic wrap-lined half sheet pan. Cover the mixture with plastic wrap and set aside until firm, about 30 minutes. Remove the top layer of plastic wrap and dust with the potato starch. Cover with a sheet pan and invert. Remove the plastic wrap and dust with potato starch. Cover with plastic wrap and set aside overnight. Transfer the marshmallows to a cutting board and discard the plastic wrap. Cut into 1 1/2-inch squares and set aside.

For the mint marshmallows, in a medium saucepan, bring the sugar, corn syrup, and water to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer until the mixture reaches 285 degrees. Remove from the heat and gradually add the gelatin, stirring constantly. Mix to combine and set side. In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, beat the egg whites, mint extract, and food coloring to medium peaks. On high speed, slowly add the sugar syrup and beat until well combined and cool, about 10 minutes. Remove the bowl from the mixer and pour the batter onto a plastic wrap-lined half sheet pan. Cover the mixture with plastic wrap and set aside until firm, about 30 minutes. Remove the top layer of plastic wrap and dust with the potato starch. Cover with a sheet pan and invert. Remove the plastic wrap and dust with potato starch. Cover with plastic wrap and set aside overnight. Transfer the marshmallows to a cutting board and discard the plastic wrap. Cut into 1 1/2-inch squares and set aside.

For the white chocolate sauce, in a small, covered saucepan, bring the sugar and water to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer until the sugar is dissolved, about two minutes. Add the pineapple and simmer for five minutes. Remove from the heat, transfer to a medium bowl, and set aside to cool. Add the chocolate and, using a rubber spatula, gently stir to combine, and set aside.

For the milk chocolate sauce, in a small, covered saucepan, bring the sugar and water to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer until the sugar is dissolved, about two minutes. Remove from the heat, transfer to a medium bowl, and set aside to cool. Add the chocolate and hazelnuts, using a rubber spatula, mix to combine, and set aside.

For the dark chocolate sauce, in a small, covered saucepan, bring the sugar and water to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer until the sugar is dissolved, about two minutes. Add the orange and simmer for five minutes. Remove from the heat, transfer to a medium bowl, and set aside to cool. Add the chocolate and hazelnuts, using a rubber spatula, mix to combine, and set aside.

To assemble, skewer some of the marshmallows and place over a hot hibachi. Accompany with graham crackers and chocolate sauces.

Dutch Apple Pie Cones

wayne harley brachman

(Serves 6)

For the apple filling:

2 tablespoons cornstarch

1/4 cup dark brown sugar

3/4 cup frozen apple juice concentrate, thawed

1 tablespoon vanilla extract

1/4 cup dried cherries

6 Golden Delicious apples, peeled, cored, and thinly sliced

For the whipped cream:

1 cup heavy cream

1 tablespoon confectioners' sugar

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

For the dish:

Waffle cones

For the apple filling, preheat the oven to 400 degrees. In a medium bowl, combine the cornstarch, brown sugar, apple juice concentrate, and vanilla extract and whisk together. Add the cherries and the apples and toss to combine. Transfer the mixture to a roasting pan, cover with aluminum foil, and place in the oven to bake for 20 minutes. Remove the Toil and bake for an additional 20 minutes or until the apples are tender. Remove from the heat and set aside to cool slightly.

For the whipped cream, place the heavy cream in a chilled bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the whisk attachment. Whisk the cream until slightly thickened, about two minutes. Add the sugar and vanilla, whisk to stiff peaks, about two minutes, and set aside.

To serve, fill each waffle cone with apple filling and top with a scoop of whipped cream.

Charlotte Russe

wayne harley brachman

(Serves 6)

For the buttermilk cake:

1/2 cup unsalted butter, softened

1 cup granulated sugar

2 eggs

1 1/2 cups cake flour

1 teaspoon baking powder

1/4 teaspoon baking soda

1/2 teaspoon salt

3/4 cup buttermilk

1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract

1/2 cup Fabbri[R] frutti di bosco paste [*]

For the whipped cream:

1 quart heavy cream

1/2 cup Fabbri frutti di bosco paste

1/2 cup confectioners' sugar

2 tablespoons raspberry puree

For the mint syrup:

1/4 cup granulated sugar

1/4 cup water

1 bunch mint, stemmed and blanched

For the assembly:

6 2 1/4-inch card stock[**] circles

6 2 "x8 1/4"-inch card stock strips

For the dish:

Raspberry puree

For the garnish:

Raspberries

(*.) Fabbri frutti di bosco paste is a wild berry paste. Available through De Choix Specialty Foods at (718) 507-8080.

(**.) Card stock is available in most art-supply stores.

For the buttermilk cake, pre heat the oven to 375 degrees. In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, combine the butter and sugar. Mix on high speed, until well combined, about 15 seconds. Add the eggs, one at a time, scraping down the sides of the bowl between each addition. Continue to mix until lemon colored and light, about six minutes. On a piece of parchment paper sift together the flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt. Repeat twice and set aside. Adjust the speed to low and add the flour, buttermilk, and vanilla extract in three stages, scraping down the sides of the bowl between each addition. Transfer the batter to a parchment-lined sheet pan. Place in the oven to bake for 15 minutes or until done. Remove from the heat and set aside to cool. Using a 2-inch round cookie cutter, cut out 12 circles and place on a parchment-lined sheet pan. Spread six of the circles with the frutti di bosco paste, top with the remaining circles, and set aside.

For the whipped cream, in the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the whip attachment, whip the heavy cream to form soft peaks. Add the frutti di bosco paste, sugar, and raspberry puree and whip to form stiff peaks, transfer to a pastry bag fitted with a medium star tip, and set aside.

For the mint syrup, in a small, covered saucepan over medium heat, bring the sugar and water to a boil, reduce the heat, and simmer until the sugar is dis solved, about two minutes. Remove from the heat and set aside to cool. In a commercial blender, puree the syrup and mint until smooth and set aside.

To assemble, arrange the card stock circle on a flat work surface and place a cake on top of each. Wrap each cake with a card stock strip and secure with tape. Pipe some whipped cream on top and drizzle with the mint syrup and raspberry puree.

To serve, garnish with a raspberry.

Raspberry Coconut and Chocolate Lamingtons

wayne harley brachman

(Serves 6)

For the banana cake:

6 ounces unsalted butter, softened

1 1/4 cups granulated sugar

3 eggs

2 1/2 cups cake flour

1 teaspoon baking soda

1/4 teaspoon baking powder

1/4 teaspoon salt

3 large bananas, peeled and pureed

1/2 cup sour cream

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

For the peanut butter buttercream:

1/2 cup unsalted butter, softened

1 cup creamy peanut butter

1 1/4 cup confectioners' sugar, sifted

For the raspberry frosting:

1/2 cup granulated sugar

1/2 cup water

2 cups raspberry puree

For the raspberry Lamington assembly:

2 cups toasted coconut flakes

For the chocolate cup cakes:

6 ounces unsalted butter, softened

1 1/2 cups granulated sugar

3 eggs

1 1/4 cups cake flour

1/2 cup unsweetened Dutch processed cocoa powder

1 teaspoon baking soda

1/4 teaspoon baking powder

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/2 cup buttermilk

1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1/2 cup strong coffee, hot

For the vanilla cream filling:

3 tablespoons vegetable shortening

3 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened

1 cup confectioners' sugar

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

1 cup light corn syrup

5 ounces semisweet chocolate, chopped

For the frosting:

3/4 cup heavy cream

For the garnish:

Strawberries

Mint springs

Note: Lamingtons are Australian in origin and are believed to be named for the former Baron and Lady Lamington of Brisbane, Australia. It is typically a cake that is dipped in chocolate and rolled in coconut.

For the banana cake, preheat the oven to 350 degrees and coat a 6-cup muffin pan with nonstick spray. In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, combine the butter and sugar. Beat on high speed for 15 seconds. Add the eggs, one at a time, beating well after each addition. Continue to mix until the mixture is lemon colored and thick, about six minutes. On a piece of parchment paper, sift together the flour, baking soda, baking powder, and salt. Repeat twice and set aside. In a medium bowl, combine the banana puree, sour cream, and vanilla and mix until combined. On low speed add the flour and banana puree in three stages, making sure to scrape down the sides of the bowl between each addition. Remove the bowl from the mixer and transfer the batter to the prepared muffin tin. Place in the oven and bake for 40 minutes or until done. Remove from the heat and set aside to cool. Remove from the pan, transfer to a parchment-lined sheet pan, and set aside.

For the peanut butter buttercream, in the bowl of an electric mixer, fitted with the paddle attachment, mix the butter and peanut butter on medium speed until well combined. Reduce the speed and add the sugar in several stages, scraping down the sides of the bowl between each addition. Adjust the speed to high and mix until smooth and light, about four minutes. Remove the bowl from the mixer, transfer the buttercream to a pastry bag fitted with a 1/4-inch round tip, and set aside.

For the raspberry frosting, in a small, covered saucepan over medium heat, bring the sugar and water to a boil, reduce the heat, and simmer until the sugar is dissolved, about two minutes. Remove from the heat and set aside to cool. Transfer to a medium bowl, whisk in the raspberry puree to combine, and set aside.

For the raspberry Lamington assembly, using a sharp knife, cut a one-inch round piece from the bottom of each cupcake and reserve. Pipe some peanut butter buttercream into the bottom, cover with a cupcake piece, and set aside on a parchment-lined sheet pan. Dip each cupcake into the raspberry frosting, roll in coconut, and set aside on a rack to dry, about 20 minutes.

For the chocolate cupcakes, preheat the oven to 350 degrees and coat a 6-cup muffin pan with non-stick spray. In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, combine the butter and sugar and mix on high speed for 15 seconds. Add the eggs, one at a time, scraping down the sides between each addition, and mix until lemon colored and light, about six minutes. On a piece of parchment paper, sift together the flour, cocoa powder, baking soda, baking powder and salt. Repeat twice and set aside. Reduce the mixer speed to low and add the flour, buttermilk, vanilla, and coffee in three stages, scraping down the sides of the bowl between each addition. Transfer the batter to the pre pared pan and place in the oven to bake for 15 minutes, or until done. Remove from the heat and set aside to cool. Remove from the pan, place on a parchment-lined sheet pan, and set aside.

For the vanilla cream filling, in the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, combine the shortening and butter on high speed and mix until well combined. Reduce the speed and gradually add the confectioners' sugar until well combined. Increase the speed and mix until light, about five minutes. In a small bowl, combine the vanilla and corn syrup. Drizzle the corn syrup into the bowl until well combined and thick, about two minutes. Remove the bowl from the mixer, set aside two tablespoons of filling, transfer the remaining filling to a pastry bag fitted with a 1/4-inch round tip, and reserve separately.

For the frosting, place the chocolate in a medium bowl and set aside. Place the heavy cream in a medium saucepan over medium heat and bring to a simmer. Remove from the heat and pour the cream over the chocolate. Gently stir with a rubber spatula until smooth and set aside.

For the chocolate cupcake assembly, using a sharp knife, cut a one inch round piece from the bottom of each cupcake, and reserve. Pipe some vanilla cream filling into the bottom, cover with a cupcake piece, and set aside on a parchment-lined sheet pan. Dip each of the cupcakes into the chocolate frosting and set aside on a rack to dry, about 20 minutes.

To finish the chocolate cupcakes, place the reserved frosting in a small paper pastry cone and cut the tip to form a small opening. Pipe some frosting in a decorative pattern on top of each and set aside.

To serve, place a raspberry Lamington and a chocolate Lamington in a paper pastry cup. Pipe some of the peanut butter cream onto the raspberry Lamington, garnish with a strawberry, a cocktail umbrella, and mint.

Biscuit Tortoni

wayne harley brachman

(Serves 6)

For the almond macaroons:

4 ounces almond paste

1/2 teaspoon almond extract

1/2 cup confectioners' sugar

1 egg white

For the tortoni cream:

Reserved macaroon crumbs

2 cups heavy cream

1/4 cup confectioners' sugar

2 tablespoons dark rum

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

For the dish:

1/4 cup toasted almonds

For the garnish:

Strawberry halves

For the almond macaroons, preheat the oven to 350 degrees. In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, combine the almond paste, almond extract, and the confectioners' sugar and mix until well combined. Add the egg white and mix until smooth, about two minutes. Remove the bowl from the mixer and set aside in the refrigerator for 15 minutes. Transfer the mixture to a pastry bag fitted with a 1/2-inch round tip. On a parchment-lined sheet pan, pipe one-inch round cookies. Place in the oven to bake until airy and golden brown, about 15 minutes. Remove from the heat and set aside to cool. Transfer the macaroons to the bowl of a food processor fitted with the metal blade attachment. Pulse the cookies until coarsely chopped. Place in a medium bowl and set aside.

For the tortoni cream, remove and reserve 1/4 cup of the macaroon crumbs. In a medium bowl, combine the remaining macaroon crumbs, one cup of the heavy cream, and confectioners' sugar. Mix to combine and place in the refrigerator to chill for 30 minutes. Add the rum and vanilla and place in the refrigerator to chill for 30 minutes. In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, beat the cream to form soft peaks. Add the macaroon mixture and mix until combined. Spoon the mixture into paper cups and place in the freezer overnight.

To serve, top with the reserved macaroons and almonds and garnish with some strawberry halves.
COPYRIGHT 2001 Culinaire, Inc.
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 2001, Gale Group. All rights reserved. Gale Group is a Thomson Corporation Company.

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Title Annotation:eating with hands
Publication:Art Culinaire
Article Type:Recipe
Geographic Code:1USA
Date:Jun 22, 2001
Words:9739
Previous Article:Techique Rick Bayless.
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