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HOT LIST.

THE PLEASURE OF THE WEB lies not only in the construction of a pointed query but in the poetic serendipity that spirals from this point of departure. When colleagues see my desktop, they often comment on the sheer number of websites I tend to visit simultaneously. The documents and images at these sites represent events happening in different temporalities. An orchestration of the Web's all-at-once profusion of collision, association, chance, and obliquity, my desktop promises infinite depth, or rather, an infinitely pleated surface. Continuously recontextualizing, montaging varied events, I use this Mobius information apparatus as a polyoptic prosthetic. Sometimes I seek the crannies of the globe, other times the pulse and flicker of the world's network as it surrounds and sprawls across my body. I am within the enveloping space of an always-on, reading-writing-viewing simultaneity of varied duration and temporality. All of this is to say that the Web is an open work of perpetual authorship, where experience is without history, an invisible trail of travels without trace. It is a new metabolism.

With this in mind, think of the following not as a list of sites but as a kit from which to construct mobiles of images, events, and text. The sites are to be enjoyed individually as well as in combination, and are presented here in the kind of experiential montage embodied by the Web.

Let's start with the colors, shapes, movement, and proliferating screens on ada'web, the Walker Art Center's online project (adaweb.walkerart.org/project/aitken). Doug Aitken and Dean Kuipers take you through a series of photos and text, narrative insinuated, the event at once imminent and immanent. Then, at FUSE98LAB (www.fuse98.com/fuse98lab/labM.htm), click on EXPERIMENTS and proceed to tables one, two, or three: Let words, images, and sound hop and skip around the screen, a microcosm or condensation of the Web. At www.combine.org/combine99/andy/idiot/01.html you're delivered a rant of narrative inspired by and borrowed from Dostoyevsky, housed in an elegant pulse of flowing text, image, and sound track. Here, film and novel blend beyond their respective genres: Is this MTV? Click-and-drag the elements of time in John Maeda's sprawling Java calendar, at www.maedastudio.com/cal1deliv/index.html--Who owns time now? Then turn to a proactive machine of chance: the Burroughs Cut-up Machine (www.bigtable.com/cut up). Put in your own text or combine it with pieces of Naked Lunch. At www.jodi.org/map, Joan Heemskerk and Dirk Paesmans present a sprawling green diagram of many early Net artworks and tropes of new media and online culture. And on to mila.ljudmila.org/nettime/zkp4/toc.htm, which offers a proliferation of links to Net-art critiques and manifestos.

Brian Eno's and Peter Schmidt's project Oblique Strategies (www.msn.fullfeed.com/[tilde]gtaylor/ObliqueStrategies/Explore.html) provides textual reminders, rarely complete, of productive ways of thinking: stratagems for living interestingly. These discrete systems of montage allow chance to insinuate itself into our reading, making serendipity constitutive of the event. At bbs2.thing.net/jam, join the GraphicJam, a seance of sorts, where you spray paint with others in real time. The only trace of the other participants is the line being drawn, ghostlike, before your eyes. Then on to Skot (www.skot.at/question.html), a diary of sound, vision, and everyday reverie, and the Universal Sleep Station (www.sleepstation.com), to look into Ana Voog's world (via "anacam"), ripe with arty art and arty nudity. Or enjoy the smiling, joyous ambience of Todd Oldham (www.toddoldham.com)--and send a postcard to a friend. And of course no Web expedition is complete without the multimedia extravaganzas at the Remedi Project (w ww.theremediproject.com), ever-revolving exhibitions of webby delight.

An artist and filmmaker, Marc Lafia is a founder of artandculture.com.
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Author:LAFIA, MARC
Publication:Artforum International
Article Type:Brief Article
Geographic Code:1USA
Date:Mar 1, 2000
Words:639
Previous Article:BANGERS AND MUSH.
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