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HOME ALONE: DO YOUR KIDS KNOW HOW TO RESPOND TO A MEDICAL EMERGENCY?

 WASHINGTON, June 22 /PRNewswire/ -- We teach our children how to write their names, say the alphabet and count. But, many of us fail to teach them something that could save their lives.
 "One of the most important gifts you can give your children is the knowledge of how to recognize and respond to medical emergencies," says Robert Schafermeyer, M.D., FACEP, an emergency physician in North Carolina and chair of the American College of Emergency Physicians Pediatric Emergency Medicine Committee.
 Almost 35 million children visited an emergency department in 1992. Yet, a recent survey commissioned by ACEP and The Upjohn Company (NYSE: UPJ) found that only one out of five families with children say they have discussed with their regular doctor what to do in a medical emergency, and only one-third said the feel "very well prepared" to handle an emergency. Whether children are home alone or with a sitter, parents can help ensure their safety by making sure every family member is prepared for an emergency.
 "When parents are out of the picture, children often become more curious," Schafermeyer noted while offering the following advice to parents:
 -- Make sure every child knows how to call for help. If your
 community does not have the 911 emergency number, learn your
 local fire, police and ambulance numbers. Clearly post all
 emergency numbers with your family's medical information by the
 phone.
 -- Lock all poisons, harmful products and weapons.
 -- Keep a first aid kit and manual in a handy place. Make sure
 family members and sitters know where the kit is located.
 If your child is with a sitter:
 -- Leave a Consent-to-Treat form for each child.
 -- Make sure your sitter knows basic first aid and how to recognize
 and respond to emergencies.
 The American College of Emergency Physicians has the following handouts available to help educate your family on emergency preparedness:
 -- "What You Should Know About Emergency Care"
 -- "Consent-to-Treat Form"
 -- "Your Home First Aid Kit"
 -- "A Kid's Guide to Emergency Medical Services"
 -- "When To Call An Ambulance"
 To obtain any of the above, send a business-size, self-addressed stamped envelope to American College of Emergency Physicians, 900 17th St. N.W., Suite 1250, Washington, D.C. 20006.
 -0- 6/22/93
 /CONTACT: Michele Kamber of the American College of Emergency Physicians, 202-728-0610/


CO: American College of Emergency Physicians ST: District of Columbia IN: MTC SU:

KD -- NYPFNS8 -- 4386 06/22/93 08:36 EDT
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Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Jun 22, 1993
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