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HOLLIDAY DEVELOPMENT: OLD MEETS NEW IN THE CHANGING BAY AREA ECONOMY; 127 LIVE-WORK LOFT CONDOMINIUMS WHERE ONE PRINTSHOP USED TO THRIVE

HOLLIDAY DEVELOPMENT: OLD MEETS NEW IN THE CHANGING BAY AREA ECONOMY; 127 LIVE-WORK LOFT CONDOMINIUMS WHERE ONE PRINTSHOP USED TO THRIVE
 SAN FRANCISCO, Sept. 24 /PRNewswire/ -- This Thursday, Sept. 24, from 6 to 8 p.m., 95-year-old artist Rudy Schmidt will return to the South of Market studios where he toiled for nearly 50 years designing labels for fruit and vegetable crates, Holliday Development Inc. said today.
 Schmidt will join dozens of his former colleagues and family members of printing entrepreneur Max Schmidt (no relation to Rudy) who will be reunited at the historic ClockTower Building at 461 Second St. in San Francisco's thriving SOMA. The 1907 landmark, with its familiar clock tower looming over the entrance to the Bay Bridge, has now been converted into 127 fashionable live-work condominiums.
 New residents of the hot-selling project -- many who are budding entrepreneurs themselves -- will have a chance to meet the former employees of Schmidt Lithograph, which for more than 75 years had its headquarters in the SOMA landmark. On exhibit will be a historical display curated by Pat Jacobsen: "Log of a Cabin Boy: The History of Schmidt Lithograph Company and the ClockTower Building."
 For over half a century, the printing firm produced countless numbers of labels and all manner of lithographic products, its presses going 24 hours a day for years. The company operated as the most prominent lithographic and printing concern in the history of San Francisco's impressive printing industry and came to be recognized throughout the world for its manufacturing quality and customer service.
 "The renovation of the ClockTower is an example of how the San Francisco economy is going through a radical restructuring from its historic manufacturing base to small high-tech service business firms that operate from the home," said Rick Holliday, developer of the lofts. "Imagine people designing fruit labels 50 years ago, looking out the same window loft dwellers do today as they program the latest software or telecommunicate with western Europe. I'm delighted we could recycle the building."
 At the Thursday evening festivities -- which include a light buffet and music spanning the decades when the printing plant was in operation -- loft owners and former printers will have ample opportunity to compare those windows.
 -0- 9/24/92
 /NOTE TO EDITORS: There will be plenty of photo opportunities./
 /CONTACT: Rick Holliday of Holliday Development, 415-896-6100/ CO: Holliday Development Inc. ST: California IN: CST SU:


GT-TM -- SF005 -- 3185 09/24/92 14:24 EDT
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Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Sep 24, 1992
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