Printer Friendly

HOLDING BACK THE YEARS '80S BANDS STILL ROCKIN'.

Byline: Amy Schweigert Staff Writer

It was just like heaven Saturday at the Hyundai Pavilion in Devore, well just like heaven, that is, for the hordes of '80s fans who attended KROQ-FM's third annual Inland Invasion.

More than 40,000 people invaded the inland venue to, as the L.A. radio station put it ``Flashback to the Future'' and see the likes of Berlin, Marc Almond, Interpol, Psychedelic Furs, Violent Femmes, Duran Duran and The Cure. The eclectic crowd, which included baby boomers, Gen X'ers and their kids, wandered among two stages, a plethora of vendors and a gratis video arcade oasis furnished with bean bags and game classics including ``Frogger,'' ``Burger Time,'' ``Super Pac-Man,'' ``Ms. Pac-Man,'' ``Missile Command'' and ``Donkey Kong.''

Berlin, the synth-pop band that gained fame with ``Take My Breath Away,'' the love theme from the Tom Cruise movie ``Top Gun,'' was the last of four acts to perform on the side stage. Lead singer Terri Nunn kept the crowd rockin' with her enthusiasm and energy. After calling Saturday's event a personal highlight, the band performed such '80s anthems as ``No More Words,'' ``The Metro'' and a cover of Depeche Mode's ``Never Let Me Down Again.''

On to the main stage, Marc Almond of Soft Cell fame appeared as a British Nicolas Cage, sporting that same slender build dressed in black pants and a short-sleeve button-down shirt exposing his tattoos; he exuded that same animated energy the actor is known for.

Calling the song ``very appropriate'' amid Saturday's late summer weather, Almond performed ``Heat,'' then later it was on to ``The Idol.'' Saying his performance wouldn't be complete without some Soft Cell songs, Almond, on stage with a pair of musicians, one of whom was dressed in a pink and orange poet shirt, closed with 1981's ``Tainted Love,'' much to the crowd's delight.

Later, the Psychedelic Furs appeared, seeming as though they were just going through the motions. Early in the set, lead singer Richard Butler fell, rebounded quickly, and after concluding the song called himself one suave bastard.

As the bright day was giving way to dusk, the Violent Femmes recharged the crowd with such favorites as ``American Music,'' ``Add it Up,'' ``Blister in the Sun'' and ``Kiss Off.''

Following the Violent Femmes, Echo and the Bunnymen and Hot Hot Heat nicely filled the time while the crowd started to anticipate the final two acts: Duran Duran and The Cure.

Introduced by KROQ personality Tami Heidi as the original Fab 5, Duran Duran came on around 8 p.m. Despite Simon LeBon looking a little tired, (he has aged), he and his bandmates dripped with excitement, sexiness and enthusiasm, despite a few technical difficulties. The band was clearly having a good time playing such faves as ``Hungry Like the Wolf,'' ``Save a Prayer'' and ``Notorious.'' Among the list of classics, the band also performed ``The Reflex,'' which sadly lacked energy. The band made up for that however with its encore of ``Girls on Film.''

Duran Duran also performed the slower tunes ``Ordinary World'' and ``Come Undone,'' in addition to floating a new song called ``Tomorrow,'' which was a bit poppy.

The Cure, fronted by Robert Smith in his signature black attire, capped the evening with a two-hour set. The band came full circle beginning with ``10:15 on a Saturday Night'' and ending with ``Boys Don't Cry.'' It was a mellow yet enthralling performance.

Although primarily a nostalgic bill Saturday, newer bands such as Interpol, out of New York, also appeared on the open-air amphitheater's stage. Interpol was vigilant and polished in running through its '80s-influenced but forward-sounding set. The downside of Interpol's performance came at its end, when some of the members seemed to lose energy and had cigarettes hanging carelessly from their mouths; it appeared at that point that the band was concluding a rehearsal.

CAPTION(S):

2 photos

Photo:

(1 -- 2) Above, Duran Duran's John Taylor, left, and Simon LeBon tear through the band's once MTV-friendly canon at the Inland Invasion in Devore on Sunday. The band also performed at the Santa Barbara Bowl on Friday. Robert Smith of The Cure, below, gives a two-hour performance of the band's textured goth-pop, closing with ``Boys Don't Cry.''

Theresa Tran/Staff Photographer
COPYRIGHT 2003 Daily News
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 2003, Gale Group. All rights reserved. Gale Group is a Thomson Corporation Company.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Title Annotation:Review; U
Publication:Daily News (Los Angeles, CA)
Date:Sep 22, 2003
Words:707
Previous Article:DURAN DURAN ORIGINAL FIVE SUPPLY WHAT AUDIENCE WANTS.
Next Article:MARRIED 65 YEARS: RACHEL AND GERALD BODE.


Related Articles
Notes: from the underground.
SMALL SCREEN THE BUZZ ON TELEVISION DICK CLARK HAS SOME NEW YEAR'S EVE COMPETITION.
LONDON CALLING YOUNG, LOUD AND BRITISH, BRASH NEW BANDS MAKE THEIR RUN AT AMERICAN AUDIENCES.
July 4 party to replace Filbert Fest.
Identifying natural resources will take longer than expected.
Notes from the underground.
ANNUAL AIRPORT SHOW REVAMPED FOR 2005.
REVAMPED AIR SHOW TODAY ROCKIN' AIRFEST TO FEATURE TOURS, FLYOVERS, BANDS.
Longtime rockers Movin' On get ready for their swan song.

Terms of use | Copyright © 2017 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters