Printer Friendly

HARLEM EIGHTH-GRADE STUDENTS RECEIVE ECONOMIC 'LIFE LESSONS' FROM MCI VOLUNTEERS

 HARLEM EIGHTH-GRADE STUDENTS RECEIVE ECONOMIC
 'LIFE LESSONS' FROM MCI VOLUNTEERS
 NEW YORK, May 20 /PRNewswire/ -- MCI, like many corporations today, emphasizes the "value-added" component of its business relationships. Now, the country's second largest long-distance provider is taking that message to the streets -- 133rd, 134th and 129th streets -- and adding value to the learning experiences of school children in a diverse and challenged inner-city New York neighborhood.
 MCI, Junior Achievement of New York and Community School District 5 introduced today an educational sponsorship program wherein MCI employees teach a business and economics curricula in three West Harlem schools. The cooperative project is the first district-wide endeavor of its kind in New York.
 More than two dozen MCI employees, based in the company's Manhattan offices, are volunteering their time and talent to teach "the connection between learning and earning" to some 300 eighth-grade students at Intermediate School 195 (Roberto Clemente), Junior High School 43 (Adam Clayton Powell), and Intermediate School 275.
 The MCI volunteers work in teams and generally visit the same classroom once a week for the duration of the eight-to-10 week program. The volunteers, acting as "consultants," use course material developed by Junior Achievement for two of its highly successful in-class business volunteer programs -- ESIS, the Economics of Staying in School, and Project Business.
 Topics covered during classroom sessions include budget planning, career development, the personal and societal effects of dropping out of school, and interview skills. Each session is activity-based and supported by the perspectives brought to the classroom by both the students and their MCI consultants.
 Howard Taylor, MCI regional vice president, emphasized the value that an outside business person can bring to students who are sometimes mired in a world view as narrow as an upper Manhattan street. "I grew up in Harlem," said Taylor, "and I can tell you first-hand that one of the most important lessons in students' lives comes when they can look beyond their immediate setting and see their goals in a bigger picture. I hope MCI can help students grasp a broader and brighter vision, and that they understand that education is what gives the vision its value."
 Douglas Schallau, president of Junior Achievement of New York, stressed the importance of the Economics of Staying in School (ESIS) curriculum. "We strongly believe," said Schallau, "that ESIS provides students with the opportunity to recognize the choices they face regarding school and to understand the impact those decisions will have on their lives. Rather than force students to stay in school, ESIS allows them to see the significance of education and its relevancy to success in life."
 April Bennett, an MCI administrative assistant, said that the program was as rewarding for the volunteers involved as for the students. "To give something back to the community is a real privilege," said Bennett. "Making connections with the students and making even a small difference in how they perceive their options is an exhilarating experience."
 Dr. Bertrand Brown, superintendent of District 5, expressed his thanks to MCI and Junior Achievement for their support of the West Harlem Schools. "It's important to note," said Brown, "that MCI came to us and asked if they could help. We are tremendously gratified by that kind of approach and delighted by the success of this program."
 The MCI-Junior Achievement-District 5 program is supported by a grant from the MCI Foundation and was initiated by MCI's Eastern Division. MCI Eastern Division supports a wide range of educational projects and community relations programs, including the MCI Scholar Awards -- in Boston, Richmond, Va., Pittsburgh, Hartford, Conn., Harrisburg, Pa., and Baltimore -- and the MCI Homework Hotline -- in Richmond and Mercer County, N.J.
 MCI's Eastern Division, based in Rye Brook, N.Y., is one of four geographic business divisions of the Washington-based telecommunications company. MCI offers a full range of domestic and global telecommunications services through one of the world's largest all- digital networks. The company, with 1991 revenue of approximately $8.4 billion, is the second largest long-distance provider in the United States and has more than 60 overseas offices in 55 countries.
 -0- 5/20/92
 /CONTACT: Jim Mion of MCI Communications, 914-933-6375, or Emily Rogan of Junior Achievement of New York, 212-344-1033, or Dr. Bertrand Brown, superintendent of Community School District 5, 212-769-7533/
 (MCIC) CO: MCI Telecommunications Corporation ST: New York IN: SU:


CK -- NY013 -- 2187 05/20/92 09:02 EDT
COPYRIGHT 1992 PR Newswire Association LLC
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1992 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:PR Newswire
Date:May 20, 1992
Words:730
Previous Article:RUSSIAN GOVERNMENT ANNOUNCES 'RED SQUARE INVITES' CULTURAL FESTIVAL
Next Article:ICELANDAIR'S MORE FREQUENT FLIGHTS ACROSS THE ATLANTIC KICKS IN AT BALTIMORE-WASHINGTON INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT
Topics:


Related Articles
School program cuts adolescent drug use.
FIRST SCHOOL YEAR OF JUNIOR ACHIEVEMENT IN K-12 CLASSROOMS ENDS WITH BIG SUCCESS; OVER 40,000 STUDENTS REGIONWIDE BENEFITED FROM JA CLASSES GIVEN BY...
HOMEWORK HOTLINE'S ADVANCED TELECOMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY CONNECTS STUDENTS WITH 'ROUND THE CLOCK HELP
MCI Expands Support of NetDay 96 Efforts to Wire Nation's Schools
MAKING THE GRADE SUMMER STUDENTS EARN ENTRANCE TO HIGH SCHOOL.
SCHOLARSHIP SURPRISE : VALLEY SENIOR ASPIRES TO TEACH OTHERS.
Ohio district eases high school transition for students.

Terms of use | Copyright © 2016 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters