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Gun-option.

Shotgun offenses are basically viewed as passing offenses. At Snow Hill, we use a combination of Winged-T, West Coast, and Wish Bone, all rolled up into a shotgun approach. Our perfect play-calling combination for a game would be pass 45% and run 55%, predicated on the type of defense we see from game-to-game and down-to-down.

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We like to use the triple and double option out of the shotgun to complement our running game. If we can get the defense to be constantly thinking about option responsibility, they are not going to be as aggressive as they would normally be nor cover the pass as well.

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We use the option to supplement our spread game plan and it has proved to be a great way to get the ball to our playmakers in the open field.

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We use letters to distinguish our skill players and their motions for the option. Our two WR's (wide receivers) are Z and H. They play off the line and we know that we have to get the ball to them in our running and passing games.

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We use two calls for our option motion--Haze for the H-back and Zap for the Zap Receiver. As you can see in the diagrams, we can use either of these motions in our basic triple and double option plays. It is just another way to get the ball to our playmakers.

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Our triple option can be run from a variety of formations, but our basic package comes out of doubles (two wide receivers right and two left)--Y and Z to called side (Diag. 1), and H and Z weak (Diag. 2). Our TB will go to the called side as well unless he hears a switch call.

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The triple option is predicated off our dart series with the TB. The play is Right Doubles, Zap or Haze Read option (Diags. 3 and 4).

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We also have a call to take the Dart, not read it, and right into pitch phase of the option (Diag. 5). We can very well use the straight speed option look to isolate our QB and TB in the pitch phase. We can also run this two ways (Diags. 6 and 7).

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These are just a few of the ways that we use the option in our shotbgun attack. Over the past two years, it has enabled us to get the ball into the hands of the two guys who are best at attacking the defense from a variety of angles.

By Jim Bryant, Football Coach

Green Central High School, Snow Hill, NC
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Title Annotation:FOOTBALL
Author:Bryant, Jim
Publication:Coach and Athletic Director
Geographic Code:1USA
Date:Oct 1, 2005
Words:445
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