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Greek fable gets a wild 3-D twist.

Clash Of The Titans

Cast: Sam Worthington, Liam Neeson, Ralph Fiennes, Gemma Arterton Direction: Louis Leterrier

THERE are three ways to make a 'big' movie in Hollywood right now. Get inspired by The Lord Of The Rings. Unleash CGI effects that make The Matrix look like Cartoon Network stuff (yes, 11 years on, the Keanu Reevesblockbuster still decides Hollywood tech-tricks). Release a 3-D version like Avatar. Clash Of The Titans (COTT) tries combining all three formulae with some success. The popcorn spectacular lets the action flow smoothly. The effects add colour to a quaint story pegged on Greek mythology. The 3-D version is not as vibrant as Avatar, but that's because COTT lacks the colours of the James Cameron epic and is essentially a darker flick -- not necessarily because the actors here don't have blue skin. Director Louis Leterrier retains fantasy adventure specifics from Desmond Davis's 1981 original film by the same name. There are grand stunts, glorious romance, towering heroes protecting gorgeous heroines, awesome monsters, gods and demons, and lust for celestial powers -- all rolled into a two-hour package that cost Warner Bros. a little over $100 million.

Leterrier's choice of hero seems obvious -- Sam Worthington, larger-than-life Aussie hunk is at the moment the face (or body, if you wish) of larger-than-life Hollywood. COTT seems like a nice progression for strapping Sam after Terminator Salvation and Avatar. The film begins on a sluggish note. The

screen writers seem more involved in crafting ancient Greece visually over the first half hour. Till the screenplay bang happens with a battle between a bunch of humans and a giant scorpion (the same one on the posters, yes). Brilliantly rendered as the sequence is, this film isn't about scorpion fights though. The scene is just one of the many energy shots that boost an otherwise limp, three-line script: In ancient Greece power struggle pits humanity against the kings, and the kings against the gods. There's war waging among the gods too, and all of it could destroy the world. Someone has to restore order. That someone is the film's hero, Perseus (Worthington), born of Zeus (Liam Neeson), Greek king of gods, but raised as a man. After failing to protect his family from Hades (Ralph Fiennes), vengeful god of the underworld, Perseus decides he has nothing to lose.

So he volunteers to lead a mission against Hades before the latter can seize power from Zeus and unleash hell on earth. The film is about Perseus's struggles mostly, as he leads his brave band through forbidden worlds. It's also about the struggles of COTT's SFX creative team, real heroes of this expensive venture who have obviously slogged at creating these fascinating worlds. Sure, Neeson's Zeus sports armour that has more bling than what models at the recent fashion week flaunted. And Gemma Arterton, playing Io the nymph-priestess whom Zeus seduced, mostly breezes across the screen as if she was on a fashion runway. But those masala bits are pitfalls you'd expect when Hollywood reinvents Greek mythology. COTT is a fun flick loaded with punch. Wash it down with corn and cola.

vinayak.chakravorty @mailtoday.in

out take

Liam Neeson's Zeus sports armour that has more bling than what models at the recent fashion week flaunted. And Gemma Arterton mostly breezes across the screen as if she wason a fashion runway. But those masala bits are pitfalls you'd expect when Hollywood reinvents Greek mythology.

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Publication:Mail Today (New Delhi, India)
Date:Apr 3, 2010
Words:585
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