Printer Friendly

Greater fiber intake associated with reduced heart disease mortality.

The Journal of Nutrition reports a reduction in the risk of dying from coronary heart disease (CHD) among men and women who consumed high fiber diets. *

Researchers evaluated data from 58,730 participants in The Japan Collaborative Cohort Study for Evaluation of Cancer Risks, carried out between 1988 and 1990. Follow-up was conducted until the end of 2003, during which 422 deaths from CHD, 983 from stroke and 675 from other cardiovascular disease were documented.

For men whose total, insoluble, and soluble fiber intakes were among the highest one-fifth of participants, there was a lower risk of dying of heart disease compared to those whose intakes were among the lowest fifth. Similar risk reductions were observed among women.

"Our results constitute supporting evidence that higher intake of both insoluble and soluble fiber, especially fruit and cereal fibers may contribute to the prevention of CHD in Japanese men and women," the authors conclude.

Editor's note: The authors list fiber's cholesterol- and blood pressure-reducing effects, as well as its ability to improve insulin sensitivity, inhibit post-meal rises in glucose and triglycerides, and increase fibrinolytic activity, as mechanisms that prevent or delay the development of atherosclerosis.

Reference

* Available at: http://jn.nutrition.org/cgi/content/abstract/140/8/1445. Accessed August 23, 2010.

COPYRIGHT 2010 LE Publications, Inc.
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 2010 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Title Annotation:IN THE NEWS
Author:Dye, D.
Publication:Life Extension
Article Type:Brief article
Geographic Code:9JAPA
Date:Nov 1, 2010
Words:210
Previous Article:Blueberries protect against cardiovascular disease risk factors in metabolic syndrome.
Next Article:Resveratrol-containing extract suppresses inflammation in human trial.
Topics:

Terms of use | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2019 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters