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Grains and the Glycemic Index.

We know that whole grains turn to sugar more slowly than refined grains, making them lower on the glycemic index. The glycemic index tells us how quickly foods turn into sugar. The slower the better to control blood sugar and for better energy. But what about refined grains? Which turns into sugar more slowly, white rice or white bread? Since so many people still eat these, it's helpful to learn which better controls blood sugar.

A study in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition measured the blood sugar of nine people with adult-onset diabetes. They prepared white rice in three ways: boiled, soaked and boiled, and cooked in a pressure cooker. Then they compared blood-sugar levels after eating either the rice or white bread. Pressure-cooked white rice was 30 percent lower on the glycemic index than any other type of cooked rice -- that's good. All the forms of rice were lower on the glycemic index than white bread. So eat meals with rice rather than bread. And, of course, if you want to boost their nutritional value and not just regulate blood sugar, eat brown rice, and whole grain bread.

Larsen, H.N., et al. "Glycemic index of parboiled rice depends on the severity of processing: study in type 2 diabetic subjects," Eur J Clin Nujtr, 54, 2000.
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Author:Fuchs, Nan Kathryn
Publication:Women's Health Letter
Date:Jun 1, 2001
Words:218
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