Printer Friendly

Gonorrhea screening.

Clinicians should perform routine screening of all sexually active women at increased risk for gonorrhea, because of the high risk for pelvic inflammatory disease, ectopic pregnancy, and chronic pelvic pain associated with asymptomatic gonorrhea infection, according to the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force.

Those at risk include sexually active women under age 25, those with previous gonorrhea or other sexually transmitted infections, those with new or multiple sex partners, those who don't consistently use condoms, sex workers, and drug users. Pregnant women with these risk factors should be screened at the first prenatal visit, and those with ongoing or new risk factors should also be screened during the third trimester because gonorrhea increases the risk of preterm rupture of membranes, chorioamnionitis, and preterm labor (Ann. Fam. Med. 2005;3:263-7).

The task force recommended against routine screening in women and men at low risk for gonorrhea, and found insufficient evidence for or against routine screening in men at high risk.
COPYRIGHT 2005 International Medical News Group
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 2005 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Title Annotation:CLINICAL CAPSULES
Author:Worcester, Sharon
Publication:Internal Medicine News
Article Type:Brief Article
Geographic Code:1USA
Date:Jul 1, 2005
Words:161
Previous Article:Asthma and pneumococcal disease.
Next Article:Condom use shortens duration of HPV infection.
Topics:


Related Articles
Pelvic infection tied to bacterial gene.
Gonorrhea Tx in men who have sex with men.
Gonorrhea; Diagnosis.
Gonorrhea; Key Q&A.
Gonorrhea and chlamydia infection among women visiting family planning clinics: racial variation in prevalence and predictors.
Screen high-risk women for gonorrhea.
Is gonorrhea add-on to chlamydia test of benefit?
Use of NAATs for STD diagnosis of GC and CT in non-FDA-cleared anatomic specimens.
Gonorrhea testing of anus and throat is urged.
Too many given 'unnecessary' gonorrhea tests.

Terms of use | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2019 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters