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Germany : Machine-drawn restoration glasses from SCHOTT authentically manufactured.

The international technology group SCHOTT uses the authentic Fourcault process to manufacture its various architectural glasses for the restoration of historic buildings. This process is used to achieve an appearance that closely resembles the period in which the respective buildings were actually built. The restoration glasses that SCHOTT offers have also received European technical certification and therefore meet the demands of monument conservationists as well as building owners and users. Ulrich Huber, Sales Manager for Architectural Glasses at SCHOTT Advanced Optics, will be giving a presentation on this topic at the event Denkmal und Energie to be held in OsnabrE-ck, Germany, on December 8.

Based on historic technologies, the Fourcault process uses molten glass that is mechanically drawn upwards between several pairs of rollers on different floors of the building and then slowly cools them down. The continuous glass ribbon is finally cut into individual sheets at the top of the drawing shaft, explains Ulrich Huber, Sales Manager for Architectural Glasses at SCHOTT Advanced Optics, in reference to how the drawing process works. The special characteristics of the restoration glasses are achieved by using this historically authentic production process, Huber adds. The typical impression of a machine-drawn glass is characterized by deviations in terms of its thickness and flatness. Melting-related traits such as bubbles, nodes and stones within certain tolerances also contribute to the characteristic look of machine-drawn glasses. At the same time, all of the characteristics of glass can be influenced during the production process and be made to closely match the appearance of the original historic glass.

Glasses that are manufactured using the Fourcault process differ from the float glasses that are used today mainly in terms of how they can be looked through and their outer appearance. When you look through machine-drawn restoration glasses, the even edges behind them look wavy. Floated glasses on the other hand leave an undistorted impression. When you look at the surface of a machine-drawn restoration glass, you will see unevenness, while a floated glass looks flat.

Furthermore, all SCHOTT restoration glasses can be processed into insulating glass, laminated glass or safety glass. When it came to renovating the Van de Velde building at Bauhaus University in Weimar, insulating glass that consisted of an outer pane of TIKANAA glass was used. The external appearance of the building now resembles the aesthetics of the period in which it was used by the State Bauhaus in Weimar. TIKANA was particularly well suited for this project because its slightly uneven surface fits in harmoniously with the buildings of the classical modern period.

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Publication:Mena Report
Date:Dec 5, 2014
Words:439
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