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Geographic distribution records for fishes of central and northern Arkansas.

Abstract.--New geographic distribution records are documented for 17 taxa of Arkansas fishes within seven families (Atherinopsidae, Catostomidae, Cyprinidae, Fundulidae, Lepisosteidae, Percidae, Petromyzontidae) from 15 counties of the central and northern portions of the state. Several species are reported from the Eleven Point (Notropis sabinae, Percina evides, Percina sclera and Percina vigil), Saline (Opsopoeodus emillae and Fundulus cluysotus), Spring (Moxostoma earinatum), Strawberry (Ichthyomyzon castaneus) and Petit Jean (Ichthyomyzon gagei) river watersheds for the first time. In addition, a new locality in Stone County is added for the endemic and federal candidate species yellowcheek darter (Etheostoma morel).

McAllister et al. (2009a; 2009b; 2009c; 2010a; 2010b) recently provided geographic distribution records for various fishes of Arkansas to update those of Robison & Buchanan (1988). In addition, McAllister et al. (2010c) reported new distributional records for 10 species of fishes from five major rivers of the state. Since comprehensive regional faunal works and their updates are typically published only after long intervals, it is important to periodically update occurrence data, especially for rarer species, such that researchers and resource managers are made aware of additional habitats that may warrant further targeted monitoring, as well as be included in future conservation planning that may benefit the species as a whole. Therefore, the purpose of the present report is to update the status of additional fishes of the central and northern portions of the state.

Fishes were collected between June 1978 and June 2002, and again during July 2007 with standard nylon seines (1.8 by 0.5 m and 2.7 by 0.5 m of 3.2 mm mesh, all dates) or backpack electroshocker (July 2007 collections only) from streams throughout various localities in central and northern Arkansas. These included watersheds in 15 counties (Benton, Boone, Crawford, Franklin, Grant, Independence, Johnson, Lawrence, Marion, Randolph, Sharp, Stone, Van Buren, Washington and Yell). Fish were identified, preserved in 10% formalin and later transferred to 50% isopropyl alcohol or 70% ethanol. Additional specimens from the July 2007 collections were preserved in 95% ethanol to provide tissues for DNA investigations. Voucher specimens in 70% and 95% ethanol were deposited in the fish collection and genetic resources collection at the North Carolina State Museum of Natural Sciences (NCSM), Raleigh, North Carolina; those in 50% isopropyl deposited in the Southern Arkansas University Fish Collection (SAU), Magnolia, Arkansas.

This study reports the collection of 96 fishes within seven families, selected from among 35 noteworthy collections. Detailed data provided on the new collection sites are as follows: (total number of specimens in parentheses, county, specific locality [section, range and township or latitude and longitude, WGS 84 geodetic datum], collection date, NCSM accession number, and comments). The nomenclature of Nelson et al. (2004) is followed.

LIST OF FAMILIES AND SPECIES

Material examined.--The following is a listing of fish families and species collected and their collection localities in central and northern Arkansas.

PETROMYZONTIDAE

Ichthyomyzon castaneus Girard (n = 1). Lawrence Co.: Strawberry River at St. Hwy. 115, 6.4 km SW of Smithville (Sec. 17, R3W, T16N). 2 May 1989. SAU. The chestnut lamprey, the most widely distributed petromyzontid in the state, is reported for the first time from the Strawberry River; Robison & Buchanan (1988) show proximate records in the Current and Spring rivers. More recently, Robison et al. (2006) reported 22 additional localities in six counties of Arkansas for 1. castaneus.

Ichthyomyzon gagei Hubbs & Trautman (n = 1). Yell Co.: Petit Jean River at co. rd., 3.2 km S of Havana (Sec. 16, R24W, T5N). 19 April 2001. SAU. This record documents the first specimen of the southern brook lamprey from the Petit Jean River system. Robison et al. (2006) reported additional L gagei from six counties of the state, including a specimen each from more northern proximate locations in Little Piney Creek (Johnson County) and the Mulberry River (Franklin County).

LEPISOSTEIDAE

Lepisosteus osseus (Linnaeus) (n = 1). Randolph Co.: Eleven Point River at U.S. 62, 8.0 km NE of Imboden (Sec. 33, R1W, T19N). 18 June 1990. SAU. The longnose gar is expected statewide (Robison & Buchanan 1988); this is only the second record of L. osseus from the Eleven Point River system.

CYPRINIDAE

Opsopoeodus emiliae (Hay) (n = 1). Grant Co.: Saline River at U.S. 270, 21.4 km W of Sheridan (34.3192[degrees]N, 92.5876[degrees]W). 20 July 2007. NCSM 47162. This is a new county record and first report of 0. emiliae from the mainstem Saline River; there are six previous records in tributaries of the Saline River (Robison & Buchanan 1988).

Erimystax x-punctatus (Hubbs & Crowe) (n = 3). Randolph Co.: Eleven Point River at U.S. 62, 8.0 km NE of Imboden (Sec. 33, R1W, T19N). 20 June 1985. SAU. This represents only the second report of E. x-punctatus from the Eleven Point River system (Robison & Buchanan 1988).

Notropis sabinae Jordan & Gilbert (n = 2). Lawrence Co.: Spring River at Imboden off U.S. 62 (Sec. 15, R2W, T18N). 15 August 1992. SAU. Randolph Co.: Eleven Point River at U.S. 62, 8.0 km NE of Imboden (Sec. 33, R1W, T19N). 20 June 1985. SAU. Robison & Buchanan (1988) mapped 15 sites for N. sabinae in the Black, Current, Strawberry and White river systems for the period 1960-1987. This study documents the first and second records for the Sabine shiner, respectively, from the Eleven Point and Spring River systems of the state. McAllister et al. (2009c) recently reported three N. sabinae (NCSM 47139) from the Strawberry River, Lawrence County. Since 1988, however, other attempts by HWR and WCS at collecting specimens of N. sabinae from other historical sites where populations were previously numerous have not been productive. The species is considered imperiled (S2) in Arkansas (NatureServe 2009).

Cyprinella whipplei (Girard) (1 = 1). Randolph Co.: Eleven Point River at St. Hwy. 93 at Dalton (Sec. 36, R2W, T21N). 18 June 1990. SAU. The steelcolor shiner is widely distributed in the uplands of Arkansas (Robison & Buchanan 1988), and this locality documents a new geographic record for the Eleven Point River.

CATOSTOMIDAE

Moxostoma carinatum (Cope) (n = 1). Sharp Co.: Spring River at Hardy, public beach area (Sec. 12, R5 W, T19N). 20 July 1987. SAU. This study documents the first record of the river redhorse from the Spring River system; there is a pre-1960 record of M carinatum from the proximate Black River (Robison & Buchanan 1988). The Arkansas range of M carinatum has been reduced due to construction of reservoirs (Robison & Buchanan 1988).

Moxostoma duquesnii (Lesueur) (n = 4). Johnson Co.: McKinney Creek at co. rd. 2020, S of 1-40, 19.2 km W of Clarksville (35.4982[degrees]N, 93.6728[degrees]W). 19 July 2007. NCSM 47062. Lawrence Co.: Strawberry River at St. Hwy. 25 (Sec. 33, R3 W, T16N). 22 July 1987. SAU. Marion Co.: Crooked Creek at St. Hwy. 101 (Sec. 35, R15W, T19N). 14 June 1978. SAU. This common sucker is restricted to Ozark-Ouachita upland streams in Arkansas (Robison & Buchanan 1988). This study provides a new county record and first report from the extensive McKinney Creek watershed (Arkansas River drainage); the third and most downstream record from the Strawberry River system; and the first record from the Crooked Creek system (White River drainage).

FUNDULIDAE

Fundulus chrysotus (n = 2). Grant Co.: Saline River at U.S. 270, 21.4 km W of Sheridan (34.3192[degrees]N, 92.5876[degrees]W). NCSM 47163. 20 July 2007. McAllister et al. (2006) provided a recent summary of the distribution of F. chrysotus in Arkansas. This fish may be expanding its range in response to increasing removal of submergent vegetation in which F. chrysotus is typically associated (Keck & Etnier 2005). This study documents a new county record and the first time the golden topminnow has been reported from the Saline River.

ATHERINOPSIDAE

Labidesthes sicculus (Cope) (n = 20). Boone Co.: Crooked Creek at gravel road, 2.4 km N of Harman (Sec. 7, R18W, T18N). 24 May 1993. SAU. Independence Co.: Curia Creek at St. Hwy. 25, 2.4 km N of Dowdy (Sec. 9, R3W, T14N). 19 June 1996. SAU. Data Creek at Charlotte (Sec. 32, R4W, T14N). 19 June 1996. SAU. Randolph Co. Eleven Point River at St. Hwy. 93 at Dalton (Sec. 36, R2W, T21N). 20 June 1985. SAU. The brook silverside is expected statewide (Robison & Buchanan 1988); these are the first records from the Curia and Data Creek systems and the second records from the Crooked Creek and Eleven Point systems.

PERCIDAE

Etheostoma sp. (cf. blennioides) Rafinesque (n = 47). Benton Co.: Osage Creek at co. rd. 12, 18.2 km E of Siloam Springs (36.1962[degrees]N, 94.3377[degrees]W). 18 July 2007. NCSM 47477. War Eagle Creek at War Eagle community, 17.5 km ESE of Rogers (36.2676[degrees]N, 93.9428[degrees]W). 19 July 2007. NCSM 47367. Crawford/Franklin cos.: Mulberry River at co. rd. 67, 3.2 km N Mulberry (35.5302[degrees]N, 94.0412[degrees]W). 19 July 2007. NCSM 47524. Grant Co.: Saline River at U.S. 270, 21.4 km W of Sheridan (34.3192[degrees]N, 92.5876[degrees]W). NCSM 47352. 20 July 2007. Independence Co.: Curia Creek at St. Hwy. 25, 12.4 km N of Dowdy (Sec. 9, R3 W, T14N). 19 June 1996. SAU. Data Creek at Charlotte (Sec. 32, R4W, T14N). 19 June 1996. SAU. Johnson Co.: McKinney Creek at co. rd. 2020, S of 1-40, 19.2 km W of Clarksville (35.4982[degrees]N, 93.6728[degrees]W). 19 July 2007. NCSM 47063. Stone Co.: Middle Fork Little Red River at Arlberg at low water bridge, E off St. Hwy. 110, 28.5 km SW of Mountain View (35.7348[degrees]N, 92.3898[degrees]W). 20 July 2007. NCSM 47073. Van Buren Co.: Archey Fork of Little Red River (Sec. 31, R14W, T12N). 27 July 1986. SAU. Archey Creek at U.S. 65 in Clinton (Sec. 10, R14W, T11N). 28 July 1986. SAU. Archey Creek at St. Hwy. 254 (Sec. 14, R16W, T12N). 28 July 1986. SAU. Washington Co.: War Eagle Creek at co. rd. 526, 22.0 km ENE of Springdale (36.2278[degrees]N, 93.9014[degrees]W). 19 July 2007. NCSM 47354. A common darter of the Ozark Upland drainages of the state, these 13 localities supplement previous sites in central and northern Arkansas (Robison & Buchanan 1988). Recent genetic studies of the greenside darter (Etheostoma blennioides) complex by Haponski & Stepien (2008) and Piller et al. (2008) suggested that the White-Ouachita river populations were quite distinct; these populations with high lateral scale counts (66-78) warranted taxonomic recognition as E. blennioides newmanii (see Page & Bun 2011).

Etheostoma moorei Raney & Suttkus (n = 5). Stone Co.: Middle Fork Little Red River at Arlberg at low water bridge, E off St. Hwy. 110, 28.5 km SW of Mountain View (35.7348[degrees]N, 92.3898[degrees]W). 20 July 2007. NCSM 47072. Specimens were collected at 0.3 m depth with a backpack electroshocker. There are few records of the endemic yellowcheek darter in the state; it is known historically from only six sites in four headwater tributaries of the upper Little Red River drainage above Greer's Ferry Lake in Cleburne, Searcy, Stone and Van Buren counties (Raney & Suttkus, 1964; Robison 1980; Robison & Buchanan 1988). Indeed, much of the shallow stream habitat was inundated by impoundment of Greer's Ferry (which began filling in 1962) and the remaining isolated populations are in peril from habitat loss and degradation (Buchanan 1974; Mitchell et al., 2002). This species is considered critically imperiled (S 1) in the state (NatureServe, 2009) and it is listed by the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission as a species of special concern (Anonymous 2004a). It is also listed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service as a federal candidate species (Anonymous 2004b). This new site record supplements previous localities in Stone County.

Etheostoma zonate (Cope) (n = 4). Independence Co.: Curia Creek at St. Hwy. 25, 2.4 km N of Dowdy (Sec. 9, R3 W, T14N). 7 August 1984. SAU. Data Creek at Charlotte (Sec. 32, R4W, T14N). 7 August 1984. SAU. According to Robison & Buchanan (1988), the banded darter is an upland species in all major drainages of the Ozarks and in all except the Red River drainage of the Ouachitas. These are the first records of E. zonate in those two creek systems.

Percina evides (Jordan & Copeland) (n = 1). Randolph Co.: Eleven Point River at U.S. 62, 8.0 km NE of Imboden (Sec. 33, R 1 W, TI 9N). 20 August 1999. SAU. This represents the first record of the gilt darter from the Eleven Point River system. Records of P. evides are common further downstream in the Black River system (Robison & Buchanan 1988).

Percina sclera (Swain) (n = 1). Randolph Co.: Eleven Point River at U.S. 62, 8.0 km NE of Imboden (Sec. 33, R1 W, T19N). 23 June 2002. SAU. This represents the first record of the dusky darter from the Eleven Point River system; Robison & Buchanan (1988) report proximate records for P. sclera from the Spring and Strawberry rivers.

Percina vigil (Hay) (n = 1). Randolph Co.: Eleven Point River at U.S. 62, 8.0 km NE of Imboden (Sec. 33, R1W,T19N). 23 June 2002. SAU. This study documents the first report of the saddleback darter from the Eleven Point River system; there are proximate records in the Current and Spring rivers (Robison & Buchanan 1988).

In summary, this study provides some noteworthy geographic distribution records for 17 taxa of Arkansas fishes within seven families (Atherinopsidae, Catostomidae, Cyprinidae, Fundulidae, Lepisosteidae, Percidae, Petromyzontidae) from 15 counties of the state. Most importantly, it documents the extension of the range of several species into the Eleven Point, Saline, Spring, Strawberry and Petit Jean river watersheds. As noted by McAllister et al. (2009c) and reiterated here, additional collections are warranted using boat-mounted electrofishing devices to help further provide an additional understanding of the distribution of fishes of the state of Arkansas.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

We thank the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission for providing scientific collecting permits to HWR and WCS. Also, many thanks to previous SAU Vertebrate Natural History classes, and former students K. Ball, C. Brummett, N. Covington and J. Rader for assistance in collecting, and Dr. G. L. Harp (Arkansas St. Univ.) for technical assistance.

LITERATURE CITED

Anonymous. 2004a. Arkansas endangered, threatened, and species of special concern. Arkansas Game & Fish Comm. Rep., January 9, 2004, Little Rock, Arkansas, 6 pp.

Anonymous. 2004b. Endangered and threatened wildlife and plants; Review of species that are candidates or proposed for listing as endangered or threatened; Annual notice of findings on resubmitted petitions; Annual description of progress on listing actions. Fed. Regist., 69(86):24876-24904.

Buchanan, T. M. 1974. Threatened native fishes of Arkansas. Pp. 67-92 in Arkansas Natural Area Plan, Arkansas Dept. of Planning, Little Rock, Arkansas, 248 pp.

Haponski, A. E. & C. A. Stepien. 2008. Molecular, morphological, and biogeographic resolution of cryptic taxa in the greenside darter Etheostoma blennioides complex. Mol. Phyl. Evol., 49:69-83.

Keck, B. P. & D. A. Etnier. 2005. Distributional changes of the fishes of the Hatchie River system in western Tennessee and northern Mississippi. Southeast. Nat., 4:597-626.

McAllister, C. T.., H. W. Robison & T. M. Buchanan. 2006. Noteworthy geographic distribution records for the golden topminnow, Fundulus chrrsotus (Cyprinodontiformes: Fundulidae), from Arkansas. J. Arkansas Mad. Sci., 60:185-188.

McAllister, C. T., H. W. Robison & T. M. Buchanan. 2010a. Distribution of the pallid shiner, Hvbopsis amnis (Cypriniformes: Cyprinidae), in Arkansas. Texas J. Sci., 62(1):15-24.

McAllister, C. T., R. Tumlison & H. W. Robison. 2009c. Geographic distribution records for select fishes of central and southern Arkansas. Texas J. Sci., 61(1):31-44.

McAllister, C. T., H. W. Robison & K. E. Shirley. 2010h. Two noteworthy geo-graphic distribution records for the white sucker, Catostomus commersonii (Cypriniformes: Catostomidae), from northern Arkansas. Texas J. Sci., 62(3): 237-240.

McAllister, C. T., W. G. Layher, H. W. Robison & T. M. Buchanan. 2010c. Geographic distribution records for ten species of fishes from five major rivers of Arkansas. Southwest. Nat., 55:587-591.

McAllister, C. T., W. G. Layher, H. W. Robison & T. M. Buchanan. 2009c. New geographic distribution records for three species of Notropis (Cypriniformes: Cyprinidae) from large rivers of Arkansas. J. Arkansas Acad. Sci., 63:192-194.

McAllister, C. T., W. C. Starnes, H. W. Robison, R. E. Jenkins & M. E. Raley. 2009c. Distribution of the silver redhorse, Alo.rostoma anisurum (Cypriniformes: Catostomidae), in Arkansas. Southwest. Nat., 54:514-518.

Mitchell, R. M., R. L. Johnson & G. L. Harp. 2002. Population structure of an endemic species of yellowcheek darter, Etheostorna moorei (Raney and Suttkus), of the upper Little Red River, Arkansas. Amer. Midi. Nat., 148:129-137.

NatureServe. 2009. NatureServe Explorer: An online encyclopedia of life [web application]. Version 7.1. NatureServe, Arlington, Virginia. Available http://wwwnatureserve.org/explorer. (Accessed: 21 October 2009)

Nelson, J. S., E. J. Crossman, H. Espinosa-Perez, L. T. Findley, C. R. Gilbert, R. N. Lea & J. D. Williams. 2004. Common and scientific names of fishes from the United States, Canada, and Mexico. Amer. Fish. Soc., Spec. Publ. 29, Bethesda, Maryland, 386 pp.

Page, L. M. & B. M. Burr. 2011. Peterson field guide to freshwater fishes of North America north of Mexico. Second Ed. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, Boston, 633 pp

Piller, K. R., H. L. Bart, Jr. & D. L. Hurley. 2008. Phylogeography of the greenside darter complex, Etheostoma hlennioides (Teleostomi: Percidae): A wide-ranging polytypic taxon. Mol. Phyl. Evol., 46:974-985.

Raney, E. C. & R. D. Suttkus. 1964. Etheostoma moorei, a new darter of the subgenus Nothonotus from the White River system, Arkansas. Copeia, 1964:130-139.

Robison, H. W. 1980. Etheostoma moorei Raney and Suttkus, Yellowcheek Darter, P. 669, in Atlas of North American Freshwater Fishes (D. S. Lee et al., ed.), North Carolina St. Mus. Nat. Hist., Raleigh, x + 854 pp.

Robison, H. W. & T. M. Buchanan. 1988. Fishes of Arkansas. Univ, Arkansas Press, Fayetteville, 536 pp.

Robison, H. W., R. Tumlison & J. C. Petersen. 2006. New distributional records of lampreys from Arkansas. J. Arkansas Acad. Sci., 60:194-196.

CTM at: cmcallister@se.edu

Chris T. McAllister, Wayne C. Starnes, Morgan E. Raley and Henry W. Robison

Science and Mathematics Division, Eastern Oklahoma State College 2805 NE Lincoln Road, Idabel, Oklahoma 74745 North Carolina State Museum of Natural Sciences, MSC #1626 Raleigh, North Carolina 27699-1626 and Department of Biology, Southern Arkansas University Magnolia, Arkansas 71754
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Author:McAllister, Chris T.; Starnes, Wayne C.; Raley, Morgan E.; Robison, Henry W.
Publication:The Texas Journal of Science
Article Type:Report
Geographic Code:1USA
Date:Nov 1, 2010
Words:3060
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