Printer Friendly

Gate, bridge, fences from their own timber bamboo.

Reports of the death of giant timber bamboo (Phyllostachys bambusoides) during the '70s were somewhat exaggerated. Flowering--often fatal in bamboo--took place at this time, and, while many groves perished, a few survived and struggled back to health.

The Dale Satre family of Concord, California, consider themselves lucky to have one of the groves that survived. (Not everyone considers bamboo a blessing.) Their planting provides a number of excess culms every year; they harvest tehse to keep the grove open and attractive, and to limit its spread. As the accompanying photographs show, the cuttings are put to good use--on garden gates and fences, as a decorative screen, to create a footbridge. Here are some tricks they've learned from years of experience with bamboo as a building material.

don't cut young, green culms; these attain their full height and diameter the first year, but stem walls thicken and harden in later years (as they turn yellow).

Cut culms with a hacksaw--saws with coarse teeth shred the stems. Leave a joint at each end of the finished member.

Cure cuttings by stacking them vertically; if you must cure them horizontally (as along a fence), support stems at several points to prevent sagging and warping. Drill holes in bamboo before nailing it; if you don't, it's likely to split.

Giant timber bamboo is ahrd to find in nurseries; most people get starts from friends or at botanic garden plant sales. For a lift of bamboo species sources, send a stamped, self-addressed envelope to American Bamboo Society, 1101 San Leon court, Solana Beach, Calif. 92075. More readily available golden bamboo, if regularly fed, watered, and thinned, can reach timber size--about 20 feet tall. (Neglected, it can become a real pest.) Some lumberyards sell bamboo poles or can order them for you.
COPYRIGHT 1984 Sunset Publishing Corp.
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1984 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:Sunset
Date:Apr 1, 1984
Words:296
Previous Article:Some house plants will root in water.
Next Article:Evergreen clematis overhead? Yes, if ...
Topics:


Related Articles
Bamboo fences, light but strong.
Building with bamboo.
Side-yard solutions.
SHOOTING FOR THE TOP; BAMBOO IS GROWING AS A RESOURCE FOR PRODUCTS THROUGHOUT THE HOME.
GARDENING: MAKE A SCREEN; DESIGN IT.
Gardening: MAKE A SCREEN.
Coded for design.
Building a garden gate; step by step guide to..
PLAY AN ACER; Try a Japanese-style garden.

Terms of use | Copyright © 2017 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters