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GM -- LEADERS IN THE TECHNOLOGY EVOLUTION

 WARREN, Mich., Jan. 29 /PRNewswire/ -- The General Motors (NYSE: GM) technical service evolution will be a major topic of conversation for dealers attending the 1993 National Automobile Dealers Association (NADA) convention and exposition which will be held at the New Orleans Convention Center, Feb. 6-9. The GM Service Technology Group (STG) will spark that conversation by providing a peek at future trends in delivery of technical service information.
 "It is important for our dealers to recognize that they are appropriately equipped for future maintenance and repair of GM vehicles," commented Richard E. Lannen, executive director of STG and North American Service Operations. "We worked hard last year to have all GM dealers equipped with CD-ROM capability. Now we will focus all of our attention on providing user-friendly systems. Giving dealer technicians the right tools to quickly and easily access information is the key to fixing it right the first time," continued Lannen.
 Customer-focused vehicle maintenance and repair programs are emerging as critical issues as the '90s unfold. This is partially due to new stringent government regulations but more specifically due to rapidly changing automotive technology.
 As the complexity of cars and trucks increases, so too has the complexity and volume of printed information necessary for dealer technicians to diagnose and repair vehicles. In 1992, GM produced more than 125,000 pages of technical service information in service manuals and dealer service bulletins alone. This volume of paper is extremely difficult for technicians to manage, let alone trying to find the needed information for quick and easy repairs.
 It is becoming apparent that electronic technology must be utilized to provide an efficient, cost-effective method for creating, indexing and retrieving needed technical service data. Also not to be overlooked are the regulations resulting from the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendment requiring all automotive manufacturers to provide emission-related service information in a standard format on an electronic medium in the near future.
 At the center of STG's "fix it right the first time" strategy are its software programs. As automotive technology has evolved, diagnostic software applications have come to the forefront. This programming which manipulates technical service information provided to GM dealerships is the key to a reliable, easily accessed yet comprehensive system.
 By far the most significant recent development in the transmission of technical service information is CD-ROM (Computer Disk-Read Only Memory) technology. A single CD-ROM disk can hold about 550 megabytes of information. This equals hundreds of thousands of pages of text and graphics. All GM dealerships now have CD-ROM capability in their service departments. Their diagnostic equipment consists of a Tech 1(R) hand-held diagnostic unit, with Mass Storage Cartridge and one of the many CD-ROM-based terminals such as a T-100 (GM CAMS) or the new T-50 terminal. In fact, the single Mass Storage Cartridge for the Tech 1 eliminates the need for the previous multiple cartridges that were needed to store information for the unit. All GM dealerships are now sent updated CD-ROM disks ensuring timely receipt of technical service information.
 The CD-ROM disks include different types of technical service information. There are now over 27,000 service bulletins stored on the disks which provide service technicians with the information it takes to fix specific problems. This eliminates the "paper chase" service technicians formerly had to go through to access bulletin information.
 All GM vehicle specifications pertinent to vehicle servicing are included on the disks -- a real time-saver vs. the older paper sources.
 "CD-ROM technology was our first step in the move to an electronic format," stated Lannen. "Next we'll move on to a comprehensive strategy for integrated service software to ensure even greater speed, accuracy and productivity for dealership service departments."
 Visit the STG exhibit No. 112 at the NADA exposition. GM Techline representatives will be available to discuss technical service programs and answer questions.
 -0- 1/29/93
 /CONTACT: Gracemary Allen of GM Service Technology Group, 313-947-9965/
 (GM)


CO: GM Service Technology Group; General Motors Corporation
 National Automobile Dealers Association ST: Michigan, Louisiana IN: AUT CPR SU:


SM-JG -- DE025 -- 0963 01/29/93 17:23 EST
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Date:Jan 29, 1993
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