Printer Friendly

GLOBAL HAWK GETS AIRWORTHINESS CERTIFICATION.

Byline: Daily News

PALMDALE - Northrop Grumman Corp. said its RQ-4A Global Hawk robot spyplane became the first unmanned aerial vehicle granted a military airworthiness certification.

This certification, along with the Certificate of Authorization from the Federal Aviation Administration, recognizes Global Hawk's ability to routinely fly within national airspace.

Global Hawk's military airworthiness was certified Jan. 25, by the U.S. Air Force, Northrop Grumman said. In granting the certificate, the Air Force determined that the Global Hawk system has a proven track record of safe and reliable operations.

``This is a historic event,'' said Randy Brown, Global Hawk Systems Group director with the Air Force's Aeronautical Systems Center at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio. ``The aircraft was evaluated against over 500 technical criteria in order to get this certification.''

The airworthiness certification covers all five production RQ-4A Global Hawk vehicles delivered so far to the Air Force. Other unmanned aerial vehicles, or UAVS, were granted civilian experimental airworthiness certifications.

The airworthiness-certification process for the larger RQ-4B Global Hawk has begun and is expected to be completed by late 2007, the company said. The first flight for the RQ-4B is planned for later this year.

The Global Hawks are assembled by Northrop Grumman workers in Palmdale.

During three deployments in the Middle East, more than 250 missions and 5,000 combat flight hours have been logged by Global Hawk aircraft.

Controlled by computer, Global Hawks can fly above 60,000 feet, above bad weather and prevailing winds, for more than 35 hours at a time.
COPYRIGHT 2006 Daily News
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 2006, Gale Group. All rights reserved. Gale Group is a Thomson Corporation Company.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:Daily News (Los Angeles, CA)
Date:Feb 21, 2006
Words:255
Previous Article:WINGSTOP, SHORTSTOPS FANS' FOOD OPTIONS HEAT UP.
Next Article:BUSINESS CONFERENCE PANEL SET SPEAKERS INCLUDE CONGRESSMEN, MORE.
Topics:


Related Articles
Pentagon unhappy about drone aircraft reliability: rising mishap rates of unmanned vehicles attributed to rushed deployments.
SPY PLANE MODEL ON DISPLAY GLOBAL HAWK HONORED AT USAF MUSEUM IN OHIO.
First in fleet: KC-135 global air traffic management (GATM).
Although combat proven, Global Hawk has yet to pass key tests.
GLOBAL HAWK MOVES NORTH UNMANNED PLANE TO STAY AT BEALE.
Army news service (Jan. 11, 2005): Army adopts NASCAR technology for helicopters.
ALL ALONE, FOR THE LONG HAUL ROBOT SPYPLANE CROSSES COUNTRY FIRST OF NAVY MARITIME UNMANNED FLIERS GOES 10 HOURS TO MARYLAND BASE.
Found Aircraft making slow, steady progress.
Transitioning an ACTD to an acquisition program: lessons learned from Global Hawk.

Terms of use | Copyright © 2018 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters