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GEORGIA POWER, SCITREK OPEN ELECTRIC VEHICLE RESEARCH CENTER

 ATLANTA, Oct. 28 /PRNewswire/ -- Georgia Power today opened the utility industry's first center totally dedicated to electric vehicle research.
 The center is housed at SciTrek, the science and technology museum of
Atlanta. Visitors will be able to see the operations of a working laboratory where the utility will test electric vehicles under a wide range of operating conditions. Georgia Power will also conduct research on all types of batteries, charging stations, and electric vehicle components.
 "We believe that electric transportation is the wave of the future, and Georgia Power intends to be a leader in testing and promoting this important technology," said Bill Dahlberg, Georgia Power president and chief executive officer. "Electric vehicles are a clear example of how electricity can be a solution to some of the country's most pressing environmental problems," he added. "EVs offer a zero-emission alternative to the cars on our roads today."
 "Our visitors will now be able to see real technology research and development as it takes place," said Gene Brandt, president and executive director of SciTrek. "No science museum has ever done this before, so it represents a real breakthrough in education."
 Georgia Power's Electric Vehicle Research Center is opening in partnership with 11 utilities across the country. The center will be part of a nationwide network coordinated by the Electric Power Research Institute -- the research arm of the electric utility industry.
 At the heart of the research center in Atlanta is the dynamometer, which can best be described as a treadmill for cars. It is the most modern, state-of-the-art equipment available for vehicle testing. The dynamometer weighs 34,000 pounds and is anchored in a concrete pit that is 20 feet long, 10 feet wide, and 8 feet deep.
 With this equipment, technicians can simulate actual road conditions. In other words, the scientists will measure how well electric vehicles perform on flat roads, on hilly roads, on expressways, and in stop-and-go city traffic.
 Visitors will also see Power Drive -- a dynamic new exhibit making its national debut in Atlanta. Power Drive's attractions include an electric taxi cab and a smog and air pollution computer model that shows how electric vehicles can improve air quality.
 In Washington, Secretary of Energy Hazel O'Leary congratulated Georgia Power, SciTrek and the 11 utilities associated with this effort. "It is particularly appropriate this important announcement is made in October, during National Energy Awareness Month," O'Leary said. "Electric vehicles represent an enormous potential for highly efficient as well as environmentally sound transportation. I'm confident this project will make a significant contribution to the body of technical knowledge on electric transportation."
 Visitors can see the Electric Vehicle Research Center and Power Drive during SciTrek's regular hours of operation -- Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Sunday, noon to 5 p.m. SciTrek is closed on Mondays.
 -0- 10/28/93
 /CONTACT: Tal Wright of Georgia Power, 404-526-7676, or 800-282-1696/


CO: Georgia Power Company; SciTrek ST: Georgia IN: UTI AUT SU:

RA-TG -- AT007 -- 7844 10/28/93 11:18 EDT
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Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Oct 28, 1993
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