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GENERAL DYNAMICS/THYSSEN HENSCHEL TEAM INTRODUCE AN IMPROVED NBC RECONNAISSANCE SYSTEM FOX VEHICLE AT AUSA ANNUAL MEETING

 GENERAL DYNAMICS/THYSSEN HENSCHEL TEAM INTRODUCE


AN IMPROVED NBC RECONNAISSANCE SYSTEM FOX VEHICLE AT AUSA ANNUAL MEETING
 STERLING HEIGHTS, Mich., Oct. 14 /PRNewswire/ -- General Dynamics Land Systems Division along with its German partner, Thyssen Henschel, introduced the first fully integrated XM93E1 Fox Nuclear, Biological and Chemical Reconnaissance System (NBCRS) System Improvement Program (SIP) vehicle today at the Association of the United States Army's annual meeting in Washington.
 The Fox NBCRS is an armored, amphibious, six-wheeled vehicle used to detect and communicate the presence of potential NBC contaminants on the battlefield. Its crew can enter a potentially hazardous area and collect air and soil samples while being protected within a safe, environmentally sealed cab. The crew is able to analyze the samples and accurately assess whether there are any contaminants present that might threaten the lives of soldiers who enter the area unprotected.
 The updated Fox vehicle unveiled today is equipped with a stand-off chemical sensor (developed by the U.S. Army) that can detect chemical vapor up to 5km away. The new vehicle provides electronics upgrades such as integration of NBC sensors through a Central Data Processing Unit, and a Commander's Interactive Display with a keyboard and printer for hard copy reports. Upgrades also include meteorological sensors to determine air temperature, wind speed and direction, relative humidity, atmospheric pressure, and ground temperature. Secure, jam-resistant, rapid digital communications can be communicated using a Single Channel Ground/Air Radio System (SINCGARS).
 The XM93E1 Fox vehicle increases detection capability and allows the U.S. Army to reduce crew size from four soldiers to three.
 The Fox SIP development contract was awarded to the GDLS/Thyssen Henschel team in March 1990 concurrently with a contract calling for production and support of 48 interim configuration Fox vehicles to be completed by October 1993. Eight of those systems have already been delivered and production qualified tested by the U.S. Army.
 Fox NBCRS vehicles were provided to the U.S. and allied forces by the German government as part of its contribution to Operation Desert Storm. The 60 Fox vehicles provided to the U.S. Forces performed flawlessly and provided an added measure of security from potential chemical threats.
 Land Systems builds the M1A2 Abrams main battle tank and is a world leader in the production of armored combat vehicles and associated support systems.
 -0- 10/14/92
 /CONTACT: Karl G. Oskoian of General Dynamics Land Systems Division, 313-825-7980/
 (GD) CO: General Dynamics Land Systems Division; Thyssen Henschel ST: Michigan IN: ARO SU: PDT


SB -- DE023 -- 9864 10/14/92 12:30 EDT
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Date:Oct 14, 1992
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