Printer Friendly

GALLUP: YOU'RE NOT GETTING ENOUGH BREAD AND GRAINS

 WASHINGTON, March 10 /PRNewswire/ -- The latest Gallup survey reveals that 93 percent of Americans aren't getting enough and sadly they don't even know it.
 Nutritionists and federal dietary guidelines suggest eating more (yes, more) bread and grain foods to achieve a lower-fat diet. But the Gallup study of 1,000 adult food shoppers shows only a few Americans have dispensed with old myths and embraced this painless secret to weight control and good health.
 "Our society spends more than $30 billion annually on a wide assortment of fat-fighting diet tools when all it might take is a few extra trips down the bread aisle," said Judi Adams, a registered dietitian who heads the nonprofit Wheat Foods Council.
 Increasing carbohydrates such as breads, cereal and pasta helps cut the percent of calories from fat, an important nutritional barometer of healthy diets, Adams said. Because carbohydrates have less than half the calories of fat, one could opt for two thin sandwiches without mayonnaise, or two dinner rolls topped with jam instead of butter.
 Why more Americans haven't made the change may stem from Gallup's discovery that 50 percent of respondents still think bread is fattening. It also may be that the USDA's year-old Food Pyramid which suggests building a diet on at least six daily servings of bread and grain foods remains a mystery to all but 3 percent of adults.
 Only 5 percent of the survey's respondents said they eat the recommended 6-11 daily servings of grain foods. The median respondent averaged just three servings. However, 74 percent incorrectly think they eat the right amount.
 "After a decade of being told to cut back or moderate everything enjoyable in the name of good health, it will take time for people to believe any notion that more is better,'" Adams explained. "But this is one of the easiest, most affordable ways to realize the health benefits from lowering fat intake."
 Adams suggested the following tips to meet the 6-11 serving goal:
 -- Eat at least two servings at every meal. Consider as one serving a slice of bread or roll, a half-cup of pasta or cooked cereal, or one- half a bagel or muffin.
 -- Snack on bread and grain foods when on the go or between meals. Try fresh bread, breadsticks, crackers or pretzels.
 -- Lighten up toppings or try it plain. Experiment with fruit jams, interesting spices, red sauces or low-fat spreads.
 The survey was commissioned after a 1991 study revealed that half of Americans did not consider white bread a wheat-based food. The sampling error margin was 3 percent.
 Gallup Findings
 Ninety-three percent of Americans said they eat less than the minimum six daily servings of bread and grain foods as suggested by federal nutrition guidelines. Just 5 percent said they eat at least six. The median was three servings daily.
 Only 3 percent of adults surveyed claimed to be "very familiar" with the federal Food Guide Pyramid. Another 24 percent said they were "somewhat familiar." The year-old illustration urges Americans to base their diet on 6-11 servings of bread and grain foods daily.
 Fifty percent of respondents incorrectly think bread is fattening. The lingering myth apparently stems from 1960s fad diets.
 Respondents recognized bread's nutritional benefits such as satisfying hunger (89 percent), and supplying fiber (76 percent) and complex carbohydrates (74 percent).
 Five-in-six Americans (83 percent) could not correctly identify the Bread and Grain Group as the basic food group from which we should choose the MOST servings daily.
 A majority of respondents (59 percent) still believe there are just four basic food groups. One-in-five (19 percent) correctly said there were five. The change was made in 1990.
 NOTE: The results are based on a Gallup national telephone survey of 1,000 randomly selected American adults who have primary shopping responsibility for their household. Interviews took place from Nov. 13 to Dec. 6, 1992. The survey has a sampling error of plus or minus 3 percentage points at the 95 percent confidence level.
 -0- 3/10/93
 /CONTACT: Melody Kimmel, 212-265-9150, Ron Arp, 816-474-9407, or Barbara Witte, 303-694-5828, all for the Wheat Foods Council/


CO: Wheat Foods Council ST: District of Columbia IN: FOD SU:

SM -- NY025 -- 4881 03/10/93 10:34 EST
COPYRIGHT 1993 PR Newswire Association LLC
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1993 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Mar 10, 1993
Words:703
Previous Article:REUTERS BUYS STAKE IN GERMAN SOFTWARE HOUSE
Next Article:250 STUDENTS SHARE $200,000 IN SEARS CRAFTSMAN SCHOLARSHIPS
Topics:


Related Articles
Bread.
Going with the grain.
New Study Links Whole-Grain Foods with More Than 30% Reduction in Heart Disease Risk.
Sara Lee Bakery Group Introduces Earth Grains Extra Fiber Breads - The First Widely Available Fortified Whole-Grain Bread in America; Formulated to...
Fortune 500 company goes a-courtin' using research.
YourLIFE: GET YOUR OATS AND EAT YOUR WAY TO HEALTH; ADD WHOLE GRAINS TO YOUR DIET AND YOU'LL REDUCE THE RISK OF CANCER AND HEART DISEASE.
Put an end to "lead bread".
Your LIFE: Grains of truth; WORRIED ABOUT THE HIGH LEVELS OF SALT IN CEREAL AND BREAD? AS LONG AS YOU KNOW THE GOOD FROM BAD THEY'RE GREAT FOR YOU.
The Wonder(R) You Love Now Offers Even More of the Nutrition You Need - Wonder Classic and Wonder Classic Sandwich Provide Even More Calcium and Now...

Terms of use | Copyright © 2016 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters