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For first time ever, renewables surpass coal.

For first time ever, renewables surpass coal

For the clearest sign yet that renewable energy has gone mainstream, consider this: Clean energy resources supplied more of America's electricity than coal for the first time ever in April. Hydropower dams, solar panels and wind turbines generated almost 68.5 million megawatt-hours of power in April, eclipsing the 60 million that coal produced that month, Energy Information Administration data released late Tuesday show. That's the most clean power the U.S. has ever made and the least coal it has burned for power in years. The shift is a testament to the rapid development of solar and wind farms across the country. The two forms of power have become so cheap to build that BloombergNEF is projecting that half of the world's power may come from renewable energy by 2050.

Apple buys more self-driving car tech

CUPERTINO, Calif. Apple has bought a struggling self-driving car startup as the iPhone maker continues to explore the potential market for robotic vehicles, despite recently curtailing its work on the technology. The Cupertino, California, company confirmed its acquisition of Drive.ai Wednesday without disclosing the price. A recent filing with California labor regulators disclosed that Drive.ai planned to close its doors this Friday, laying off 90 workers . Apple didn't say whether its deal included the engineers who were set to lose their jobs with Drive.ai. Apple trimmed the size of its own self-driving car division in January when it reportedly eliminated more than 200 jobs in the division. The deal gives Apple the rights to Drive.ai technology deployed in self-driving vans that had been giving short-distance rides in two Texas cities, Arlington and Frisco. Uber, meanwhile, confirmed Wednesday that it acquired a self-driving technology company called Mighty AI.

Durable goods orders fall 1.3% in May

WASHINGTON Orders to U.S. factories for long-lasting manufactured goods fell sharply in May while demand in a category that tracks business investment rose modestly. Orders fell 1.3% in May following an even bigger 2.8% drop in April, the Commerce Department reported Wednesday. That weakness reflected a sharp falloff in orders for commercial aircraft, a category that has been hurt by the troubles with Boeing's MAX aircraft, which has been grounded by global regulators.

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Title Annotation:Washington_
Publication:Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)
Geographic Code:1U9CA
Date:Jun 27, 2019
Words:379
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