Printer Friendly

Food Biopreservatives of Microbial Origin.

Everyone will be aware that there has been a rising tide of opposition to the overprocessing of foods. The public have come to understand that natural foods are better for them and therefore want all their foods to be as close to nature as possible. The fact that such an idea means that some processed foods cannot not now be made in the same way or even with the same standard of shelf-life has not got through to them. Obviously the food industry has not kept the public sufficiently informed as to some of the problems encountered, although it has bent over backwards in its haste to provide minimally processed products for this market area. Technology such as modified atmosphere packaging and the use of chilling are usually necessary. Now, such foods need to have a very low bacteriological count to ensure sufficient shelf-life and that count may well rise dramatically over time and any deviation from the ideal storage temperature can have a dramatic effect on the actual count.

All the above means that simple preservatives are often required but what are such preservatives? This book aims to provide information both on the current need for biopreservatives and the different antimicrobial metabolites of starter culture micro-organisms, up-to-date information about the antimicrobial effectiveness of organic acid, diacetyl, hydrogen peroxide, bacteriocins, etc. Thus, the chapter titles run: The need for food biopreservation; Foods and microorganisms of concern; Procedures to detect antimicrobial activities of microorganisms; Cells of lactic acid bacteria as food biopreservatives; Acetic, propionic and lactic acids of starter culture bacteria as biopreservatives; Diacetyl of lactic acid bacteria as a food biopreservative; Hydrogen peroxide, lactoperoxidase and reuterin; Bacteriocins of starter culture bacteria as food biopreservatives - an overview; Nisin of Lactococcus Lactis ssp. Lactis as a food biopreservative; Pediocin(s) of Pediococcus acidilactici as a food biopreservative; Bacteriocins of lactic acid bacteria, and Metabolites of yeasts as biopreservatives.
COPYRIGHT 1993 Food Trade Press Ltd.
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1993 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:Food Trade Review
Article Type:Book Review
Date:Jul 1, 1993
Words:316
Previous Article:Laboratory Methods for Sensory Analysis of Food.
Next Article:Transport Phenomena of Foods and Biological Materials.
Topics:


Related Articles
Chemicals in the Human Food Chain.
Microbial Hazards Associated with Handling and Packaging of Chicken Giblets.
Essentials of the Microbiology of Foods.
Microorganisms in Foods 5: Characteristics of Microbial Pathogens.
MODERN FOOD MICROBIOLOGY.
ANTIOXIDANTS IN FOOD - PRACTICAL APPLICATIONS.
MAGNETIC RESONANCE IN FOOD SCIENCE - A VIEW TO THE FUTURE.
WATER MANAGEMENT IN THE DESIGN AND DISTRIBUTION OF QUALITY FOODS.
HYGIENE MANAGEMENT IN FOOD FACTORIES.
Microbial Food Contamination. (Bookshelf).

Terms of use | Copyright © 2016 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters