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First record of the scorpion genus Microtityus from Colombia, with the description of a new species (Scorpiones, Buthidae).

The genus Microtityus Kjellesvig-Waering 1966 is a group of scorpions including 24 known species (one fossil) and two subspecies (Armas 1999; Fet & Lowe 2000; Teruel 2000, 2001; Gonzalez-Sponga 2001; Teruel & Armas 2006; Teruel & Infante 2007). The genus is known mainly from the Caribbean islands, with seven species present in Cuba, five in the Dominican Republic, one in Trinidad and Tobago, and one in the U.S. Virgin Islands--St. Thomas and St. John Islands (Francke & Sissom 1980; Armas 1999; Fet & Lowe 2000; Teruel 2000, 2001; Teruel & Armas 2006; Teruel & Infante 2007). Even though Armas (1974:24) mentioned the presence of this genus in Puerto Rico (according to a personal communication from M.A. Gonzalez-Sponga), no species from that island is known to date. Similarly, although Santiago-Blay et al. (1990) made reference to the genus in Haiti, they did not mention the specific identity of populations from that country, and no paper stating the presence of any species of Microtityus in Haiti has yet been published. In continental South America this genus is represented by a lower number of species; eight from Venezuela and only one from Brazil (Fet & Lowe 2000; Gonzalez-Sponga 2001).

Armas (1974) created the subgenus Microtityus (Parvabsonus) for the Cuban species Microtityus fundorai Armas 1974, Microtityus jaumei Armas 1974 and Microtityus trinitensis Armas 1974, and 13 species from Caribbean islands have been described in the subgenus. More recently, Teruel (2000) defined two species-groups within Microtityus (Parvabsonus) to separate the species with reductive neobothriotaxy (M. jaumei group: femoral trichobothrium [d.sub.2] absent) from those with orthobothriotaxy (Microtityus waeringi Francke & Sissom 1980 group: femur with the complete set of trichobothria). Even though the remaining species are placed within the nominal subgenus, their subgeneric position should be reevaluated--as has already been indicated by Fet & Lowe (2000). A check-list of the species and the countries where they are known to occur as well as the current subgeneric and species-group placements are presented in Table 1. Microtityus starri Lourenco & Huber 1999 and Microtityus iviei Armas 1999 are not included in the table since Prendini (2001) synonymized the former species with Microtityus rickyi Kjellesvig-Waering 1966, and Teruel (2005) considered the second an invalid taxon.

The relatively high species richness of this genus in Venezuela contrasts strongly with neighboring countries such as Brazil with a single species, and Colombia and Guyana where Microtityus is unrecorded. Despite this situation, recent collections carried out by the second author at the transition zone of the Tayrona Natural National Park (Fig. 1) discovered a new population of Microtityus that corresponds to a new species that is herein described and assigned to the nominal subgenus. The new species is the first of the genus to be known from Colombia, raising to five the number of buthid genera in the country: Ananteris Thorell 1891, Centruroides Marx 1890, Microtityus, Rhopalurus Thorell 1876 and Tityus Koch 1836.

METHODS

Photographs were taken using an Olympus D-590 ZOOM digital camera. Illustrations were prepared with the aid of a camera lucida mounted onto a Zeiss Stemi SV 6 stereoscope. Measurements (L = length, W = width, D = depth) are presented in millimeters and were obtained following the methodology of Sissom et al. (1990) using the program Motic Images 2000 version 1.2 through a PC connected to a Motic Digital Microscope DM-143. The distribution map was produced with the program ArcView GIS version 3.1 (Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI), Redlands, California). All specimens are preserved in 70% ethanol.

General carinal terminology follows Vachon (1952), except for the mesosomal carinae that are here distinguished as follows. In the tergites: axial, dorsolateral and lateral carinae; in the sternites: paramedian and lateral carinae. According to Vachon's (1952) terminology for the carinae on the pedipalp femur, the carina that follows the dorsointernal is referred to as ventrointernal (see Vachon 1952: fig. 65); however, in the specimens studied herein there is an additional and more ventral carina to which the term ventrointernal is more suitable, thus making it necessary to replace Vachon's (1952) term ventrointernal for internal median. Trichobothrial terminology follows Vachon (1973, 1975). In the present paper, the notion of subgenus is used as an optional rather than obligatory category.

Acronyms of museums: Museo Javeriano de Historia Natural "Lorenzo Uribe S. J.," Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogota, Colombia (MPUJ); Instituto de Ciencias Naturales, Museo de Historia Natural, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota, Colombia (ICN-MHN).

TAXONOMY

Family Buthidae Koch 1837

Genus Microtityus Kjellesvig-Waering 1966

Microtityus Kjellesvig-Waering 1966:130.

Type species.--Microtityus rickyi Kjellesvig-Waering 1966 by original description.

Revised diagnosis.--Very small scorpions (less than 25 mm length); general coloration yellowish to reddish-yellow with variegated pigmentation; carapace sub-triangular and emarginated, with three pairs of lateral eyes; pedipalps either orthobothriotaxic [11 trichobothria on femur in A-[alpha] configuration, 13 on patella and 15 on chela: subgenus Microtityus (Parvabsonus) (in part, only M. waeringi group), subgenus Microtityus (Microtityus) (in part)], with only femur neobothriotaxic [trichobothrium d2 absent: Microtityus (Parvabsonus) (in part, only M. jaumei group), Microtityus (Microtityus) (in part)], with both femur and chela neobothriotaxic [Microtityus (Microtityus) (in part)], or with only chela neobothriotaxic [Microtityus (Microtityus) (in part, only Microtityus litoralensis Gonzalez-Sponga 2001)]; dentate margin of pedipalp movable fingers composed of 9-12 oblique rows of granules, without accessory granules; tergites with three or five longitudinal carinae; pectines with well developed fulcra; sternum sub-pentagonal; booklung spiracles ovoid; subaculear tubercle strong and rhomboidal.

Microtityus (Microtityus) franckei sp. nov.

Figs. 1-14; Tables 1-3

Type material.--Holotype: COLOMBIA: Department of Magdalena: adult female, Santa Marta, transition zone of the Tayrona Natural National Park, Kalache Kalabria private reserve, 11[degrees]16'21"N, 74[degrees]04'59.9"W, December 2006, J.A. Noriega (MPUJ-SCO-366).

Paratypes: COLOMBIA: Department of Magdalena: 2 adult males, collected with holotype (MPUJ-SCO-367, ICN-MHNAs-650).

Etymology.--The species name is a patronym dedicated to Oscar F. Francke, arachnologist at the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, in recognition of his many contributions to scorpiology and acknowledgment of his advice in the senior author's research.

Diagnosis.--The new species seems to be most closely related to both Microtityus joseantonioi Gonzalez-Sponga 1981 and Microtityus desuzei Gonzalez-Sponga 2001 from Venezuela, with which it shares the presence of only 10 trichobothria on the pedipalp femur ([d.sub.2] absent) and 12 on the chela ([Eb.sub.3], Esb and esb absent) (Figs. 9, 10, 13, 14; Table 2), rather than the standard pattern of 11 and 15 trichobothria on both segments, respectively. Microtityus franckei can be readily distinguished from both species of the neighboring country because it bears 11-12 rows of granules in the movable finger of pedipalps, the internal tubercle on the base of pedipalp femur is low and non-spinoid in both sexes (Figs. 9, 10), and sternite V of males exhibits only one hyaline and smooth area, which is shaped like an equilateral triangle (Fig. 8). In contrast, judging from the original descriptions, in M. joseantonioi and M. desuzei the movable finger presents 9 rows of granules, the internal tubercle on the base of the pedipalp femur is pronounced and spinoid (Gonzalez-Sponga 1981: fig. 11; Gonzalez-Sponga 2001: fig. 7), and sternite V of males exhibits 3 hyaline and smooth areas (Gonzalez-Sponga 1981, 2001) of which the median one is higher than wide in M. joseantonioi (Gonzalez-Sponga 1981:fig. 14). The new species may be also distinguished from M. desuzei in that it presents five carinae in tergites I-VII, rather than only three as in the second species (Gonzalez-Sponga 2001).

[FIGURE 1 OMITTED]

Description of the female holotype (MPUJ-SCO-366).--Measurements in Table 3. Coloration: carapace predominantly yellow with abundant dark-brown mottling. Median ocular tubercle dark-brown. Chelicerae yellow with some brownish areas located basally on both fixed and movable fingers, and one externally on tibia; teeth reddish. Tergites almost completely yellow; I-IV with brown regions restricted to the posterior margin and separated from each other by the longitudinal carinae; V-VII with few, disperse brown spots. Coxosternal region with all the components yellowish, with abundant brown spots that are darker in coxapophyses II and are fused in a great brown area obscuring coxapophyses I almost completely. Genital operculum yellow with a small brown area located laterally on each piece. Basal piece of the basal lamellae of the pectines with few spots; the remaining pieces and the pectinal basal piece completely yellow. Sternites with few dark-brown spots. Metasoma yellowish with brown mottling throughout. Telson predominantly yellow, brownish basally near the dorsal surface; body of the subaculear tubercle and distal area of the vesicle brown, margins of the subaculear tubercle yellow; aculeus dark-red over almost its entire length, yellow basally. Pedipalps with variegated pigmentation over dorsal, internal, and external surfaces of all segments, ventral surfaces completely yellow; fixed and movable fingers brown-colored basally and yellow over the rest of their lengths. Legs with variegated pigmentation in all segments.

Carapace: subtriangular, densely granulose throughout; anterior margin moderately emarginated; median ocular tubercle slightly anterior to the center of the carapace; lateral ocular tubercles each with three ocelli; median ocular and posterior median carinae granulose and moderately strong; other carinae and furrows inconspicuous.

Chelicerae: with abundant setae on internal and ventral surfaces; cheliceral dentition characteristic of the family Buthidae (Vachon 1963). Movable finger externally with two small basal teeth, one median pronounced, one subdistal slightly shorter than the median, and one distal tooth. Internally with two small teeth, one basal and one median, and one distal tooth that is longer than its external counterpart. Fixed finger externally with one basal and one median tooth mounted onto a bicuspid, one subdistal, and one distal tooth. Internally with only one small tooth located slightly basal in respect to the external subdistal.

Coxosternal region: sternum pentagonal with a deep median depression; all the components of this region granulose; coxapophyses I-II anteriorly with dense pilosity.

Tergites: with similar granulation to that of the carapace; five longitudinal carinae (axial, paired dorsolateral and lateral carinae) are present on the posterior half of tergites I-VI and are formed by elevated granules that are arranged linearly, the posterior most granule on each carina is markedly stronger and surpasses the margin of the tergite; tergite VII pentacarinate.

Genital operculum and pectines: genital operculum divided longitudinally; pieces count on the pectines: basal lamellae 3:3, middle lamellae 6:6, fulcra 7:8, teeth 8:9; pectinal basal piece almost quadrangular in shape, expanded distally and with the posterior margin straight (Fig. 6).

Sternites: densely granulose throughout; sternites VI-VII with paired paramedian and lateral carinae, incomplete and granulose; booklung spiracles short and oval.

Metasoma: segments I-II with ten carinae (paired ventral, ventrolateral, intermedian, dorsolateral and dorsal carinae); segments III-IV with eight (intermedian carinae absent); segment V with five (axial, paired ventrolateral and dorsolateral carinae); all carinae serrulose; intercarinal spaces granulose. Telson with axial carina that terminates in a rhomboidal subaculear tubercle that is curved towards the aculeus and exhibits two small dorsal granules; aculeus strongly curved.

Pedipalps: densely granulose throughout; femur with five longitudinal carinae (dorsoexternal, dorsointernal, ventrointernal, ventroexternal and internal median carinae), and low and non-spinoid tubercle located basally on the internal surface (Figs. 9, 10); patella with seven longitudinal carinae [all of those identified by Vachon (1952:figs. 66-68) except for the ventral median that is absent], with two spinoid granules on the dorsointernal carina and one in the ventrointernal (Fig. 11); hand with seven longitudinal carinae [all of those identified by Vachon (1952:fig. 69)], of which the dorsal axial, dorsal accessory and intermedian carinae extend over part of the fixed finger; all carinae granulose. Movable fingers with 12 slightly imbricate rows of granules in both pedipalps; fixed fingers with ten rows. Pedipalps neobothriotaxic; trichobothriotaxy Type A, femur with a configuration (Figs. 9-14) (Vachon 1973, 1975); femoral trichobothrium [d.sub.2] absent (Fig. 9); patellar [d.sub.2] petite and almost indistinguishable (Fig. 11); [Eb.sub.3], Esb and esb absent on chela (Fig. 13).

[FIGURES 2-5 OMITTED]

Legs: tibia, basitarsus and telotarsus with abundant setation; prolateral and retrolateral pedal spurs present on all legs.

Comparisons with male paratypes.--MPUJ-SCO-367: Measurements in Table 3. The following features differ from those described for the female holotype: tergites V-VI with similar coloration pattern to the preceding tergites. Coxapophyses II and coxae I-IV completely yellow. Pieces count on the pectines: fulcra 9:9, teeth 10:10. Pectinal basal piece less expanded than the female's and emarginated anteriorly (Fig. 7). Sternite V with a posterior median hyaline and smooth area, which is shaped like an equilateral triangle (Fig. 8). Cheliceral dentition identical to that of the female. Pedipalp movable fingers with the same 12 rows of granules of the female.

[FIGURES 6-8 OMITTED]

ICN-MHN-As-650: Measurements in Table 3. Similar to the other male, except that patellar trichobothrium [d.sub.2] is absent in both pedipalps, pedipalp patella bears eight longitudinal carinae with ventral median carina present, and the movable fingers present 11:12 rows of granules.

Distribution.--Microtityus franckei is known only from the type locality: Kalache Kalabria private reserve at 11[degrees]16'21"N, 74[degrees]04'59.9"W (Fig. 1). This species inhabits the Santa Marta Montane Forests ecoregion, which rises from very different habitat of xeric scrub and dry forest that surround it. This ecoregion is a mountain massif whose northern edge runs just off the coast of the Caribbean Sea. Due to both plant and animal endemism it is considered a Pleistocene refuge, although its diversity is relatively low and limited in comparison with other Neotropical ecoregions (National Geographic Society 2001).

[FIGURES 9-14 OMITTED]

Field observations and sympatric species.--All of the specimens were hand captured in daylight from under stones in the dry bed of a river at 134 m above sea level. This species was found in sympatry with Ananteris columbiana Lourenco 1991, Tityus tayrona Lourenco 1991, and an unidentified species of Chactas Gervais 1844.

Some biogeographic and taxonomic considerations.--Even though Armas & Marcano-Fondeur (1992) suggested that reductive neobothriotaxy has occurred independently more than once within Microtityus, Teruel (2000) rejected such an hypothesis arguing that: (i) the loss of trichobothria is an infrequent phenomenon in the family Buthidae and when it occurs in various species of the same genus, it is a synapomorphic condition; (ii) the M. jaumei species-group is a natural lineage that seems to have evolved from an orthobothriotaxic ancestor--an hypothesis supported by the presence of this condition in the most ancient species of the genus known to date, Microtityus ambarensis (Schawaller 1982) from Dominican amber of 40-30 mya. Although Teruel's (2000) consideration--which was not backed by a cladistic analysis--seems correct for the Caribbean species of Microtityus [subgenus Microtityus (Parvabsonus)], it appears inappropriate when the continental species are considered since this region is occupied also by both orthobothriotaxic and neobothriotaxic species (Table 2). In contrast to the neobothriotaxy observed in some insular Microtityus, which consists of the absence of only femoral trichobothrium [d.sub.2], South American representatives exhibit various different types of neobothriotaxy (Table 2). The distributions of both orthobothriotaxic and neobothriotaxic species indicate that the second condition may have appeared independently more than once. We suggest that an orthobothriotaxic ancestor--probably belonging to the nominal subgenus as it is supported by the fossil evidence--passed from South America to the Caribbean lands about 37-35 mya when both plates were in contact (Iturralde-Vinent & MacPhee 1999). Such an ancestor may then have originated the first form of Microtityus (Parvabsonus) from which both the M. jaumei and the M. waeringi groups evolved and diversified. In South America, actual neobothriotaxic species may have evolved, too, from orthobothriotaxic ancestors. These hypotheses await rigorous testing with cladistic analyses, as is the monophyly of Microtityus (Parvabsonus). Considering that only M. joseantonioi, M. desuzei, and M. franckei share the same trichobothrial pattern it is plausible that these species may be closely related phylogenetically.

Taking into account that Venezuela exhibits a high species richness for this genus in comparison to Colombia, the discovery of M. franckei suggests that more species of Microtityus may be present in Colombia. This also takes into account one described species exists in the state of Amazonas, Brazil--namely Microtityus vanzolinii Lourenco & Eickstedt 1983, plus an additional species from the state of Matto Grosso, partly illustrated by Gonzalez-Sponga (2001: fig. 23), which yet remains undescribed.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

The authors wish to express special gratitude to Erich S. Volschenk, Mark S. Harvey (Western Australian Museum, Perth), Oscar F. Francke (Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico), Paula E. Cushing (Denver Museum of Nature and Science, Denver), and Lorenzo Prendini (American Museum of Natural History, New York) for reading earlier drafts of the manuscript and making valuable comments that led to its improvement; and to Rolando Teruel (Centro Oriental de Ecosistemas y Biodiversidad, Santiago de Cuba), Luis F. de Armas (La Habana, Cuba) and O.F. Francke for their kind help in acquiring relevant literature and fruitful discussions previous to and throughout the construction of the manuscript. Additional thanks are due to Juan Carlos Dib (Universidad del Magdalena, Santa Marta, Colombia) for his hospitality during the second author's stay at Kalache Kalabria private reserve, to Juan Manuel Renjifo and Camila Renjifo for their help in the field, to Giovanny Fagua (PUJ, Bogota) for the loan of some laboratory equipment, to Luis G. Perez (PUJ) for his help in obtaining the measurements, and to Andres R. Acosta (PUJ) for providing helpful information about ecoregions. Thanks to R. Pinto da Rocha and the organizing committee of the 17th International Congress of Arachnology for financial support that allowed the first author to attend the ISA Congress.

Manuscript received 19 October 2007, revised 12 March 2008.

LITERATURE CITED

Armas, L.F. 1974. Escorpiones del Archipielago Cubano. II. Hallazgo del genero Microtityus (Scorpionida: Buthidae), con las descripciones de un nuevo subgenero y tres nuevas especies. Poeyana 132:1-26.

Armas, L.F. 1988. Sinopsis de los escorpiones Antillanos. Editorial Cientifico-Tecnica, La Habana. 102 pp.

Armas, L.F. 1999. Quince nuevos alacranes de La Espanola y Navassa, Antillas Mayores (Arachnida: Scorpiones). Avicennia 10-11:109-144.

Armas, L.F. & E.J. Marcano-Fondeur. 1992. Nuevos alacranes de Republica Dominicana (Arachnida: Scorpiones). Poeyana 420:1-36.

Fet, V. & G. Lowe. 2000. Family Buthidae. Pp. 54-286. In Catalog of the Scorpions of the World 1758-1998. (V. Fet, W.D. Sissom, G. Lowe & M.E. Braunwalder, eds.). The New York Entomological Society, New York.

Francke, O.F. & W.D. Sissom. 1980. Scorpions from the Virgin Islands (Arachnida, Scorpiones). Occasional Papers, The Museum, Texas Tech University 65:1-19.

Gonzalez-Sponga, M.A. 1970. I. Record del genero Microtityus para Venezuela. II. Microtityus biordi (Scorpionida: Buthidae) nueva especie para el sistema de la costa en Venezuela. Monografias Cientificas "Augusto Pi Suner" (Instituto Universitario Pedagogico de Caracas) 1:1-18.

Gonzalez-Sponga, M.A. 1981. Un nuevo genero y dos nuevas especies de la familia Buthidae de Venezuela (Arachnida: Scorpiones). Monografias Cientificas "Augusto Pi Suner" (Instituto Universitario Pedagogico de Caracas) 13:1-26.

Gonzalez-Sponga, M.A. 2001. Aracnidos de Venezuela. Seis nuevas especies del genero Microtityus (Scorpionida: Buthidae) del sistema montafioso de la costa. Boletin de la Academia de Ciencias Fisicas, Matematicas y Naturales 61(1-2):45-66.

Iturralde-Vinent, I. & R. MacPhee. 1999. Paleogeography of the Caribbean region, implications for Cenozoic biogeography. Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History 238:1-95.

Kjellesvig-Waering, E.N. 1966. The scorpions of Trinidad and Tobago. Caribbean Journal of Science 6(3-4):123-135.

Lourenco, W.R. & V.R.D. Eickstedt. 1983. Presence du genre Microtityus (Scorpiones, Buthidae) au Bresil. Description de Microtityus vanzolinii sp. n. Revue Arachnologique 5(2):65-72.

National Geographic Society. 2001. Terrestrial ecoregions of the world. Online at http://www.nationalgeographic.com/wildworld/terrestrial.html (Accessed 15 February 2008).

Prendini, L. 2001. Further additions to the scorpion fauna of Trinidad and Tobago. Journal of Arachnology 29:173-188.

Santiago-Blay, J.A., W. Schawaller & G.O. Poinar. 1990. A new specimen of Microtityus ambarensis (Scorpiones, Buthidae), fossil from Hispaniola: evidence of taxonomic status and possible biogeographic implications. Journal of Arachnology 18:115-117.

Sissom, W.D., G.A. Polis & D.D. Watt. 1990. Field and laboratory methods. Pp. 445-461. In The Biology of Scorpions. (G.A. Polis, ed.). Stanford University Press, Stanford, California.

Teruel, R. 2000. Una nueva especie de Microtityus Kjellesvig-Waering, 1968 (Scorpiones: Buthidae) de Cuba Oriental. Revista Iberica de Aracnologia 1:31-35.

Teruel, R. 2001. Taxonomia y distribution geografica de Microtityus fundorai Armas, 1974 (Scorpiones: Buthidae) en la provincia Santiago de Cuba, Cuba. Revista Iberica de Aracnologia 4:29-33.

Teruel, R. 2005. Nuevos datos sobre la taxonomia, distribucion geografica y ecologia de los escorpiones de la Republica Dominicana (Scorpiones: Liochelidae, Scorpionidae, Buthidae). Boletin de la Sociedad Entomologica Aragonesa 36:165-176.

Teruel, R. & L.F. Armas. 2006. Un nuevo Microtityus Kjellesvig-Waering, 1966 (Scorpiones: Buthidae) de Cuba Oriental. Boletinde la Sociedad Entomologica Aragonesa 38:113-116.

Teruel, R. & L.M. Infante. 2007. Un nuevo escorpion del genero Microtityus Kjellesvig-Waering 1966 (Scorpiones: Buthidae) de la region oriental de Cuba. Boletin de la Sociedad Entomologica Aragonesa 40:227-231.

Vachon, M. 1952. Etudes sur les scorpions. Archives de l'Institut Pasteur d'Algerie, 482 pp.

Vachon, M. 1963. De l'utilite, en systematique, d'une nomenclature des dents des cheliceres chez les scorpions. Bulletin du Museum National de Histoire Naturelle (Paris) (2eser.) 35(2):161-166.

Vachon, M. 1973. Etude des caracteres utilises pour classer les familles et les genres de scorpions (Arachnides). 1. La trichobothriotaxie en arachnologie. Sigles trichobothriaux et types de trichobothriotaxie chez les scorpions. Bulletin du Museum national de Histoire naturelle (Paris) (3e ser.) 104:857-958.

Vachon, M. 1975. Sur l'utilisation de la trichobothriotaxie du bras des pedipalpes des scorpions (Arachnides) dans le classement des genres de la famille des Buthidae Simon. Comptes Rendus des seances de l'Academie des Sciences (Paris) (ser. D) 281:1597-1599.

Vachon, M. 1977. Contribution a l'etude des scorpions Buthidae du Nouveau Monde. I. Complement a la connaissance de Microtityus rickyi Kj.-W. 1956 de l'Ile de la Trinite. II. Description d'une nouvelle espece et d'un nouveau genre Mexicains: Darchenia bernadettae. III. Cle de determination des genres de Buthidae du Nouveau Monde. Acta Biologica Venezolana 9(3):283-302.

Ricardo Botero-Trujillo and Jorge Ari Noriega: Laboratorio de Entomologia, Unidad de Ecologia y Sistematica--UNESIS, Departamento de Biologia, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogota, Colombia. E-mail: pachyurus@yahoo.com
Table 1.--Checklist of the species of Microtityus and the
countries where they have been reported. Species marked
with single asterisk (*) belong to the M. waeringi
species-group while those with double asterisk (**)
belong to the M. jaumei group according to Teruel's
(2000) proposal.

 Trinidad
 Colombia Dominican and
Species Brazil Cuba Republic Tobago

M. (Microtityus) ambarensis
 (Schawaller 1982) (fossil) X
M. (Microtityus) angelaerrosae
 Gonzalez-Sponga 2001
M. (Microtityus) biordi
 Gonzalez-Sponga 1970
M. (Microtityus) capayaensis
 Gonzalez-Sponga 2001
M. (Microtityus) desuzei
 Gonzalez-Sponga 2001
M. (Microtityus) franckei X
M. (Microtityus) joseantonioi
 Gonzalez-Sponga 1981
M. (Microtityus) litoralensis
 Gonzalez-Sponga 2001
M. (Microtityus) rickyi
 Kjellesvig-Waering 1966 X
M. (Microtityus) sevciki
 Gonzalez-Sponga 2001
M. (Microtityus) vanzolinii
 Lourenco & Eickstedt 1983 X
M. (Microtityus) yaracuyanus
 Gonzalez-Sponga 2001
M. (Parvabsonus) consuelo
 Armas & Marcano-Fondeur X
 1987 *
M. (Parvabsonus) difficilis
 Teruel & Armas 2006 ** X
M. (Parvabsonus) dominicanensis
 Santiago-Blay 1985 * X
M. (Parvabsonus) farleyi
 Teruel 2000 * X
M. (Parvabsonus) fundorai
 Armas 1974 ** X
M. (Parvabsonus) guantanamo
 Armas 1984 * X
M. (Parvabsonus) jaumei
 Armas 1974 ** X
M. (Parvabsonus) kovariki
 Teruel & Infante 2007 ** X
M. (Parvabsonus) lantiguai
 Armas & Marcano-Fondeur X
 1992 *
M. (Parvabsonus) paucidentatus
 Armas & Marcano- X
 Fondeur 1992 **
M. (Parvabsonus) trinitensis
 Armas 1974 ** X
M. (Parvabsonus) virginiae
 Armas 1999 * X
M. (Parvabsonus) waeringi
 Francke & Sissom 1980 *

 U. S.
 Virgin
Species Brazil Venezuela Islands

M. (Microtityus) ambarensis
 (Schawaller 1982) (fossil)
M. (Microtityus) angelaerrosae
 Gonzalez-Sponga 2001 X
M. (Microtityus) biordi
 Gonzalez-Sponga 1970 X
M. (Microtityus) capayaensis
 Gonzalez-Sponga 2001 X
M. (Microtityus) desuzei
 Gonzalez-Sponga 2001 X
M. (Microtityus) franckei
M. (Microtityus) joseantonioi
 Gonzalez-Sponga 1981 X
M. (Microtityus) litoralensis
 Gonzalez-Sponga 2001 X
M. (Microtityus) rickyi
 Kjellesvig-Waering 1966
M. (Microtityus) sevciki
 Gonzalez-Sponga 2001 X
M. (Microtityus) vanzolinii
 Lourenco & Eickstedt 1983 X
M. (Microtityus) yaracuyanus
 Gonzalez-Sponga 2001 X
M. (Parvabsonus) consuelo
 Armas & Marcano-Fondeur
 1987 *
M. (Parvabsonus) difficilis
 Teruel & Armas 2006 **
M. (Parvabsonus) dominicanensis
 Santiago-Blay 1985 *
M. (Parvabsonus) farleyi
 Teruel 2000 *
M. (Parvabsonus) fundorai
 Armas 1974 **
M. (Parvabsonus) guantanamo
 Armas 1984 *
M. (Parvabsonus) jaumei
 Armas 1974 **
M. (Parvabsonus) kovariki
 Teruel & Infante 2007 **
M. (Parvabsonus) lantiguai
 Armas & Marcano-Fondeur
 1992 *
M. (Parvabsonus) paucidentatus
 Armas & Marcano-
 Fondeur 1992 **
M. (Parvabsonus) trinitensis
 Armas 1974 **
M. (Parvabsonus) virginiae
 Armas 1999 *
M. (Parvabsonus) waeringi
 Francke & Sissom 1980 * X

Table 2.--Trichobothriotaxy of the species currently assigned
to Microtityus (Microtityus). Ortho = Orthobothriotaxic;
Neo = Neobothriotaxic. Trichobothria in parentheses are absent.

Species Femur Patella Chela

M. ambarensis Ortho Ortho Ortho
M. angelaerrosae Neo ([d.sub.2]) Ortho Neo (esb)
M. biordi Ortho Ortho Ortho
M. capayaensis Neo ([d.sub.2]) Ortho Ortho
M. desuzei Neo ([d.sub.2]) Ortho Neo
 ([Eb.sub.3],
 Esb, esb)
M. franckei Neo ([d.sub.2]) Ortho/Neo Neo
 ([d.sub.2]) ([Eb.sub.3],
 Esb, esb)
M. joseantonioi Neo ([d.sub.2]) Ortho Neo
 ([Eb.sub.3],
 Esb, esb)
M. litoralensis Ortho Ortho Neo
 ([Eb.sub.3],
 Et, esb)
M. rickyi Ortho/Neo Ortho Ortho
 ([d.sub.2])
M. sevciki Neo ([d.sub.2]) Ortho Ortho
M. vanzolinii Ortho Ortho Ortho
M. yaracuyanus Neo ([d.sub.2]) Ortho Ortho

Species References

M. ambarensis Santiago-Blay et al. 1990; Teruel 2000
M. angelaerrosae Gonzalez-Sponga 2001
M. biordi Gonzalez-Sponga 1970
M. capayaensis Gonzalez-Sponga 2001
M. desuzei Gonzalez-Sponga 2001
M. franckei This paper
M. joseantonioi Gonzalez-Sponga 1981
M. litoralensis Gonzalez-Sponga 2001
M. rickyi Kjellesvig-Waering 1966; Vachon 1977;
 Armas 1988; Prendini 2001
M. sevciki Gonzalez-Sponga 2001
M. vanzolinii Lourenco & Eickstedt 1983
M. yaracuyanus Gonzalez-Sponga 2001

Table 3.--Morphometric measurements (mm) of female
holotype and male paratypes of Microtityus franckei sp. nov.

 Female Male Male
 holotype paratype paratype
 (MPUJ- (MPUJ- (ICN-MHN-
 SCO-366) SCO-367) As-650)

Total 18.65 16.33 14.79
 body
 length
 (including
 telson)

Carapace Length 2.28 1.86 1.95
 Anterior W 1.38 1.07 1.14
 Posterior W 2.72 2.10 2.29
 Ocular diameter 0.13 0.09 0.10
 Interocular 0.20 0.18 0.23
 distance
Mesosoma Total L 5.84 4.71 3.20
Metasoma Total L 10.51 9.76 9.64
 (including
 telson)
 Segment I L 1.32 1.18 1.12
 Segment I W 1.25 1.04 1.09
 Segment I D 1.24 0.97 1.01
 Segment II L 1.59 1.46 1.47
 Segment II W 1.04 0.92 0.93
 Segment II D 1.03 0.91 0.90
 Segment III L 1.64 1.54 1.54
 Segment III W 0.98 0.87 0.86
 Segment III D 0.95 0.91 0.87
 Segment IV L 1.66 1.54 1.62
 Segment IV W 0.90 0.81 0.86
 Segment IV D 0.87 0.86 0.86
 Segment V L 2.43 2.37 2.20
 Segment V W 0.78 0.79 0.80
 Segment V D 0.85 0.87 0.86
 Telson L 1.89 1.67 1.69
 Vesicle W 0.74 0.70 0.65
 Vesicle D 0.77 0.68 0.69
Pedipalps Total L 7.72 7.72 6.41
 Femur L 1.83 1.48 1.58
 Femur W 0.63 0.55 0.58
 Patella L 2.17 1.75 1.82
 Patella W 0.91 0.69 0.74
 Chela L 3.72 3.05 3.01
 Chela W 0.89 0.79 0.79
 Chela D 0.86 0.74 0.73
 Movable
 finger L 2.46 1.88 1.92
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Author:Botero-Trujillo, Ricardo; Noriega, Jorge Ari
Publication:Journal of Arachnology
Article Type:Report
Date:May 1, 2008
Words:4526
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