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First Gas secures transformer replacement for Santa Rita gas plant.

A replacement transformer for one of the generating units of the 1,000-megawatt Santa Rita gas-fired power facility is set for installation so its output can be brought back to maximum.

Lopez firm First Gas Corporation announced that the transformer had been shipped by Siemens Power Operations, Inc. from Shanghai, China and had finally arrived in the country this week.

The equipment will replace the one that was damaged February this year - which then technically reduced the electricity supply delivery of the First Gas plant to the grid.

First Gas noted that the new transformer is of the 318-megavolt ampere (MVA) model and has 250-megawatt capacity. It will be replacing a similar piece of equipment that had no longer been capable for use since its damage.

"The damaged transformer rendered Unit 40 of Santa Rita inoperable and resulted in the loss of a quarter - or approximately 250MW - of Santa Rita's 1,000MW supply of electricity to the Luzon grid," First Gas said.

From a port in Batangas City, the Lopez firm noted that "the transformer will be transported to the plant site, whereby installation and commissioning will immediately follow."

The company added that upon completion of the transformer replacement process and re-commissioning, "Santa Rita Unit 40 will resume operations and restore approximately 250MW back to the Luzon grid."

It must be recalled that a 'transformer change' was also undertaken by the Lopez Group at its San Lorenzo gas plant last year for the unit that was razed by fire.

The affected San Lorenzo generating unit was brought back into operation at the time that Luzon grid was in need of additional power and when the sector had been flustered with array of policy issues and rate hike predicaments due to the shutdown then of the Malampaya gas production facility.

Both the Santa Rita and San Lorenzo gas plants are fed with gas from Malampaya and are also on power supply agreements underwritten by Manila Electric Company.

FGPC owns and operates the 1,000-MW Santa Rita combined-cycle natural gas-fired power plant in Batangas, 100 kilometers south of Manila, Philippines. The Santa Rita power plant uses natural gas from the Malampaya Gas Field in offshore Northwest Palawan. The Santa Rita power plant project was developed, financed, and constructed by First Gas Power Corporation (FGPC).

CAPTION(S):

NEW TRANSFORMER FOR SANTA RITA'S 250-MW POWER PLANT UNIT - Lopez-controlled First Gas Power Corporation (FGPC), a wholly owned subsidiary of First Gen Corporation, successfully brought to the country through its plant operator Siemens Power Operations, Inc. a new 318MVA transformer for 1 of the 4 units of FGPC's Santa Rita natural gas-fired combined cycle power plant in Batangas City. The transformer, which arrived at the port of Batangas City from Shanghai, China, will replace a similar piece of equipment that was damaged in February of this year. The damaged transformer rendered Unit 40 of Santa Rita inoperable and resulted in the loss of a quarter - or approximately 250 MW - of Santa Rita's 1000MW supply of electricity to the Luzon grid. The transformer, shown being unloaded at the Batangas container port, will be transported the Santa Rita plant site, whereby installation and commissioning will immediately follow. Once completed, Santa Rita Unit 40 will resume operations and restore approximately 250 MW back to the Luzon grid.
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Title Annotation:Business News
Publication:Manila Bulletin
Geographic Code:9PHIL
Date:Jul 4, 2014
Words:548
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