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Fhallon Ware-Gilmore.

FHALLON WARE-GILMORE (1), MICHELLE PEIFFER (2), DR. KETIA SHUMAKER (1), DR. DAWN LUTHE (2), DR. GARY FELTON (2) (1) THE UNIVERSITY OF WEST ALABAMA, LIVINGSTON, AL 35470 2PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY, UNIVERSITY PARK, PA 16802

Pest insects have significant economic, environmental and social impacts. The cabbage looper, Trichoplusia ni, is a pest native the United States. They feed on many vegetable plants including all members of the Brassicaceae family, and even tomatoes. When herbivores initiate feeding on a host plant, they present "cues", which the plant perceives and uses to help rapidly mobilize its defenses in response to the herbivore's attack on the plant. This study was designed to determine if T. ni, is able to induce the production of leaf hairs or trichomes on newly forming leaves of tomato plants. In some plant species, herbivores or defoliation triggers the production of increased trichomes which act as defenses against herbivores. We will be answering three questions: The first being, "Does cabbage looper saliva induce trichomes?". To investigate this question, we will ablate the spinneret so that the insect is unable to salivate on the plant. Our next question addresses, "Does increased trichome density interfere with growth of cabbage loopers?" A methyl jasmonate treatment, which induces higher trichome densities, will be applied to the tomato plants. The third question is "Does cabbage looper saliva affect the expression of the defense gene, proteinase inhibitor 2?". These experiments will be conducted to better understand the interaction between insects and plants to facilitate the development of new pest control systems.

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Title Annotation:Biological Sciences Paper Abstracts; effect of Trichoplusia ni on leaf formation on tomato plants
Author:Ware-Gilmore, Fhallon; Peiffer, Michelle; Shumaker, Ketia; Luthe, Dawn; Felton, Gary
Publication:Journal of the Alabama Academy of Science
Article Type:Author abstract
Date:Apr 1, 2015
Words:255
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