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Fellowships, Grants, & Awards.

Planning Grants for Biomedical Epidemiologic and Intervention Studies

The National Institute on Aging and the NIEHS will provide grant support for planning and protocol development of biomedical epidemiologic and intervention studies in research areas supported by the Geriatrics Program.

Applications may be submitted by foreign and domestic for-profit and nonprofit organizations, public and private, such as universities, colleges, hospitals, laboratories, units of state and local government, and eligible agencies of the federal government. Racial/ethnic minority individuals, women, and persons with disabilities are encouraged to apply as principal investigators.

The mechanism of support will be the NIA Planning Grant (R21), which will provide up to $150,000 in direct costs for one year. The award cannot be renewed. Applicants should note that NIA or NIEHS funding of a planning grant does not imply a commitment by NIA or NIEHS to fund the proposed full-scale study, nor even to accept a subsequent application for such a study.

Applications should he submitted on Application Form PHS 398. Application kits are available at most institutional offices of sponsored research and may be obtained from the Division of Extramural Outreach and Information Resources, NIH, 6701 Rockledge Drive, MSC 7910, Bethesda, MD 20892-7910 USA, by calling 301-435-0714, or by e-mailing grantsinfo@ nih.gov. Applications ate also available on the Internet at http://grants.nih.gov/grants/forms.htm.

Contact: Evan C. Hadley, Associate Director, Geriatrics, NIA, 7201 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 3E327, MSC 9205, Bethesda, MD 20892-9205 USA, fax: 301-402-1784, e-mail: hadleye@exmur. nia.nih.gov; or Gwen W. Collman, Program Administrator, Environmental and Molecular Epidemiology, NIEHS, PO Box 12233, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 USA, 919-541-4980, fax: 919-541-4937, e-mail: collman@niehs.nih.gov. Reference: PA No. PA-99-145

Cancer Education

Grants are available from the National Cancer Institute to support the development and implementation of curriculum-dependent programs to train predoctoral and postdoctoral candidates in cancer research settings that are highly interdisciplinary and collaborative.

This program is particularly applicable to cancer prevention and control, epidemiology, nutrition, and the behavioral and population sciences. However, it should also be considered by other highly interdisciplinary areas of research (such as imaging and molecular diagnosis) that will require sustained leadership, dedicated faculty time, specialized curriculum development, interdisciplinary research environments, and more than one mentor per program participant to achieve their education and research career development objectives.

Application deadlines include June 1, October 1, and February 1. Applicants must use Application Form PHS 398. Application kits are available by calling 301-437-0714, by e-mailing grantsinfo@nih.gov, or on the Internet at http://grants.nih.gov/grants/ forms.htm.

Contact: Lisa Begg, Cancer Training Branch, NCI, 6116 Executive Boulevard, Suite 7011, MSC 8346, Bethesda, MD 20892-8346 USA, fax: 301-402-4472, e-mail: begg1@mail.nih.gov. Reference: PA No. PAR-00-064

Innovative Grants on Immune Tolerance

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases invite applications for exploratory/developmental research project grants to support novel work on the molecular mechanisms and applications of antigen-specific immune tolerance, which is the selective and long-term inactivation of immune responses. The projects should involve a high degree of innovation and have a clearly articulated potential to improve understanding of immune tolerance. Investigators new to immune tolerance are particularly encouraged to develop projects in this area.

Research projects will be supported by the exploratory/developmental research grant mechanism, which provides the resources to carry out preliminary feasibility tests for new research hypotheses. Letters of intent are requested by 1 August 2000 for applications that are due 14 September 2000.

The goal of this initiative is to support truly innovative projects on immune tolerance and to encourage investigators working in other areas of research to bring novel perspectives and expertise to this field. High-risk, high-impact projects that have the potential to significantly increase our understanding of the mechanisms that induce long-lived, antigen-specific immune tolerance for application to human disease are sought. Studies relevant to the etiology and/or treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus are of particular interest to the NIDDK. Studies on HIV/AIDS are excluded from this program. Within a two- or three-year funding period, it is expected that successful projects will yield sufficient data to support a well-planned and rigorous future grant application to continue the work by competing within the general pool of unsolicited applications.

Highly innovative short-term pilot projects to evaluate new but as yet speculative concepts in immune tolerance may include, but are not limited to, research in the following areas: 1) the mechanistic basis for differences in tolerance induced by systemic versus mucosal routes, 2) identification and characterization of promising new T or B cell molecular targets for tolerance induction, 3) the parameters of tolerance induction to nonpeptide self antigens, alloantigens, or allergens, 4) the molecular events responsible for the loss of tolerance to self antigens, 5) methods to extend the duration of antigen-specific tolerance, 6) novel technologies to identify and quantitate tolerant T or B cells, 7) development or application of cell and tissue engineering methods to predictably induce tolerance rather than immunity, 8) characterization of novel antigen-specific immunosuppressive cell types, 9) identification of mechanisms by which currently known tolerogenic biological or pharmaceutical agents induce and maintain immune tolerance, 10) development of simple and reliable assays for the identification of tolerant states in humans, and 11) development of "vaccine" strategies to induce antigen-specific tolerance to disease-related autoantigens or allergens.

Contact: Helen Quill, Division of Allergy, Immunology and Transplantation, NIAID, 6700-B Rockledge Drive, Room 5140, Bethesda, MD 20892-7640 USA, 301-496-7551, fax: 301-402-2571, e-mail: hquill@niaid.nih.gov; or Barbara Linder, Division of Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolic Diseases, NIDDK, Building 45, Room 5AN18A, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA, 301-594-0021, fax: 301-480-3503, e-mail: linderb@extra.niddk.nih.gov. Reference: RFA AI-00-006

Beryllium-Induced Disease

The goal of this proposed research initiative is to encourage and support studies that will advance our understanding of the mechanisms of chronic beryllium disease (CBD). The participating institutes and agencies are interested in supporting research in (but not limited to) the following areas: 1) the genetic basis of beryllium sensitivity and development of CBD, 2) inflammation and granuloma formation, 3) development of in vitro and in vivo models of beryllium sensitivity, 4) biomarkers of beryllium sensitivity and progression of CBD, and 5) methods of prevention.

Applicants must use Application Form PHS 398, which has annual due dates of February 1, June 1, and October 1. Application kits are available by calling 301-437-0714, e-mailing grantsinfo@nih.gov, or on the Internet at http://grants.nih.gov/grants/forms.htm.

Contact: George Malindzak, Organs and Systems Toxicology Branch, NIEHS, PO Box 12233, MD EC-23, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 USA, 919-541-3289, fax: 919-541-5064, e-mail: malindzak@niehs.nih.gov; Robert Musson, Division of Lung Biology and Disease Program, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, 6701 Rockledge Drive, Room 10108, MSC 7952, Bethesda, MD 20892-7952 USA, 301-435-0222, fax: 301-480-3557, e-mail: mussonr@gwgate.nhlbi.nih.gov; Roy M. Fleming, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road NE, Building 1, Room 3053, MS-D30, Atlanta, GA 30333 USA, 404-639-3343, fax: 404-639-4616, e-mail: rmf2@cdc.gov; or Paul J. Seligman, Deputy Assistant Secretary, Office of Health Studies, Department of Energy, 19901 Germantown Road, Germantown, MD 20874 USA, 301-903-5926, fax: 301-903-3445, e-mail: paul.seligman@eh.doe.gov. Reference: PA No. PA-99-075

Exploratory Grants for Genomic Imprinting and Environmental Disease Susceptibility

The NIEHS invites research grant applications from interested investigators to conduct timely, innovative, and mechanistic research on the importance of genomic imprinting in determining susceptibility to environmentally induced diseases through a program of exploratory investigator-initiated R21 grants.

The exploratory/developmental (R21) grant mechanism is used for pilot projects or feasibility studies to support creative, novel, high risk/high pay-off research that may produce innovative advances in science. This announcement is to encourage applications from individuals who ale interested in testing novel or conceptually creative ideas to understand the potential role that environmental agents play in causing epigenetic changes in the DNA that can alter imprint gene expression, thereby resulting in a multitude of genetic diseases including cancer and neurobehavioral disorders. The final receipt date will be 1 October 2002.

Applications may be submitted by domestic for-profit and nonprofit organizations such as universities, colleges, hospitals, laboratories, units of state and local

Planning Grants for Biomedical Epidemiologic and Intervention Studies

The National Institute on Aging and the NIEHS will provide grant support for planning and protocol development of biomedical epidemiologic and intervention studies in research areas supported by the Geriatrics Program.

Applications may be submitted by foreign and domestic for-profit and nonprofit organizations, public and private, such as universities, colleges, hospitals, laboratories, units of state and local government, and eligible agencies of the federal government. Racial/ethnic minority individuals, women, and persons with disabilities are encouraged to apply as principal investigators.

The mechanism of support will be the NIA Planning Grant (R21), which will provide up to $150,000 in direct costs for one year. The award cannot be renewed. Applicants should note that NIA or NIEHS funding of a planning grant does not imply a commitment by NIA or NIEHS to fund the proposed full-scale study, nor even to accept a subsequent application for such a study.

Applications should be submitted on Application Form PHS 398. Application kits are available at most institutional offices of sponsored research and may be obtained from the Division of Extramural Outreach and Information Resources, NIH, 6701 Rockledge Drive, MSC 7910, Bethesda, MD 20892-7910 USA, by calling 301-435-0714, or by e-mailing grantsinfo@ nih.gov. Applications are also available on the Internet at http://grants.nih.gov/grants/forms.htm.

Contact: Evan C. Hadley, Associate Director, Geriatrics, NIA, 7201 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 3E327, MSC 9205, Bethesda, MD 20892-9205 USA, fax: 301-402-1784, e-mail: hadleye@exmur. nia.nih.gov; or Gwen W. Collman, Program Administrator, Environmental and Molecular Epidemiology, NIEHS, PO Box 12233, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 USA, 919-541-4980, fax: 919-541-4937, e-mail: collman@niehs.nih.gov. Reference: PA No. PA-99-145

Cancer Education

Grants are available from the National Cancer Institute to support the development and implementation of curriculum-dependent programs to train predoctoral and postdoctoral candidates in cancer research settings that are highly interdisciplinary and collaborative.

This program is particularly applicable to cancer prevention and control, epidemiology, nutrition, and the behavioral and population sciences. However, it should also be considered by other highly interdisciplinary areas of research (such as imaging and molecular diagnosis) that will require sustained leadership, dedicated faculty time, specialized curriculum development, interdisciplinary research environments, and more than one mentor per program participant to achieve their education and research career development objectives.

Application deadlines include June 1, October 1, and February 1. Applicants must use Application Form PHS 398. Application kits are available by calling 301-437-0714, by e-mailing grantsinfo@nih.gov, or on the Internet at http://grants.nih.gov/grants/ forms.htm.

Contact: Lisa Begg, Cancer Training Branch, NCI, 6116 Executive Boulevard, Suite 7011, MSC 8346, Bethesda, MD 20892-8346 USA, fax: 301-402-4472, e-mail: begg1@mail.nih.gov. Reference: PA No. PAR-00-064

Innovative Grants on Immune Tolerance

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases invite applications for exploratory/developmental research project grants to support novel work on the molecular mechanisms and applications of antigen-specific immune tolerance, which is the selective and long-term inactivation of immune responses. The projects should involve a high degree of innovation and have a clearly articulated potential to improve understanding of immune tolerance. Investigators new to immune tolerance are particularly encouraged to develop projects in this area.

Research projects will be supported by the exploratory/developmental research grant mechanism, which provides the resources to carry out preliminary feasibility tests for new research hypotheses. Letters of intent are requested by 1 August 2000 for applications that are due 14 September 2000.

The goal of this initiative is to support truly innovative projects on immune tolerance and to encourage investigators working in other areas of research to bring novel perspectives and expertise to this field. High-risk, high-impact projects that have the potential to significantly increase our understanding of the mechanisms that induce long-lived, antigen-specific immune tolerance for application to human disease are sought. Studies relevant to the etiology and/or treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus are of particular interest to the NIDDK. Studies on HIV/AIDS are excluded from this program. Within a two- or three-year funding period, it is expected that successful projects will yield sufficient data to support a well-planned and rigorous future grant application to continue the work by competing within the general pool of unsolicited applications.

Highly innovative short-term pilot projects to evaluate new but as yet speculative concepts in immune tolerance may include, but are not limited to, research in the following areas: 1) the mechanistic basis for differences in tolerance induced by systemic versus mucosal routes, 2) identification and characterization of promising new T or B cell molecular targets for tolerance induction, 3) the parameters of tolerance induction to nonpeptide self antigens, alloantigens, or allergens, 4) the molecular events responsible for the loss of tolerance to self antigens, 5) methods to extend the duration of antigen-specific tolerance, 6) novel technologies to identify and quantitate tolerant T or B cells, 7) development or application of cell and tissue engineering methods to predictably induce tolerance rather than immunity, 8) characterization of novel antigen-specific immunosuppressive cell types, 9) identification of mechanisms by which currently known tolerogenic biological or pharmaceutical agents induce and maintain immune tolerance, 10) development of simple and reliable assays for the identification of tolerant states in humans, and 11) development of"vaccine" strategies to induce antigen-specific tolerance to disease-related autoantigens or allergens.

Contact: Helen Quill, Division of Allergy, Immunology and Transplantation, NIAID, 6700-B Rockledge Drive, Room 5140, Bethesda, MD 20892-7640 USA, 301-496-7551, fax: 301-402-2571, e-mail: hquill@niaid.nih.gov; or Barbara Linder, Division of Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolic Diseases, NIDDK, Building 45, Room 5AN18A, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA, 301-594-0021, fax: 301-480-3503, e-mail: linderb@extra.niddk.nih.gov. Reference: RFA AI-00-006

Beryllium-Induced Disease

The goal of this proposed research initiative is to encourage and support studies that will advance our understanding of the mechanisms of chronic beryllium disease (CBD). The participating institutes and agencies are interested in supporting research in (but not limited to) the following areas: 1) the genetic basis of beryllium sensitivity and development of CBD, 2) inflammation and granuloma formation, 3) development of in vitro and in vivo models of beryllium sensitivity, 4) biomarkers of beryllium sensitivity and progression of CBD, and 5) methods of prevention.

Applicants must use Application Form PHS 398, which has annual due dates of February 1, June 1, and October 1. Application kits are available by calling 301-437-0714, e-mailing grantsinfo@nih.gov, or on the Internet at http://grants.nih.gov/grants/forms.htm.

Contact: George Malindzak, Organs and Systems Toxicology Branch, NIEHS, PO Box 12233, MD EC-23, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 USA, 919-541-3289, fax: 919-541-5064, e-mail: malindzak@niehs.nih.gov; Robert Musson, Division of Lung Biology and Disease Program, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, 6701 Rockledge Drive, Room 10108, MSC 7952, Bethesda, MD 20892-7952 USA, 301-435-0222, fax: 301-480-3557, e-mail: mussonr@gwgate.nhlbi.nih.gov; Roy M. Fleming, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road NE, Building 1, Room 3053, MS-D30, Atlanta, GA 30333 USA, 404-639-3343, fax: 404-639-4616, e-mail: rmf2@cdc.gov; or Paul J. Seligman, Deputy Assistant Secretary, Office of Health Studies, Department of Energy, 19901 Germantown Road, Germantown, MD 20874 USA, 301-903-5926, fax: 301-903-3445, e-mail: paul.seligman@eh.doe.gov. Reference: PA No. PA-99-075
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Publication:Environmental Health Perspectives
Date:May 1, 2000
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