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Fathers' Role in Children's Academic Achievement and Early Literacy. ERIC Digest.

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Noting that our ability to incorporate the cultural strengths and the distinctive ways that families, specifically fathers, contribute to educational accomplishments of preschool children is severely constrained by major gaps and inadequacy in the research literature, this Digest explores what is known about the role of fathers in young children's academic achievement and early literacy. Among the research discussed is a critical review of research on father involvement in childrens education and schooling that concluded that fathers' participation in literacy activities, the barriers that parents face as a result of low literacy, and their perceptions of the role that they can play in their children's literacy development may affect children's preparedness for school. The Digest discusses research that examines the extent to which fathers are involved with their children's schools, and points out that even when fathers have limited schooling, their involvement in children's schools and school lives is a powerful factor in children's academic achievement. The Digest also points out that children's development of early literacy begins at birth and relies on a range of environmental stimuli, and that fathers can ensure that their children are exposed to the best environmental stimuli by participating at home and in early childhood education settings. The Digest concludes with suggestions for ways that early childhood educators can introduce fathers to approaches that provide opportunities for children to scribble and write, learn new vocabulary, identify letters and important words such as their names, and utilize relevant print within and outside the household. (LPP)

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Author:Gadsden, Vivian; Ray, Aisha
Publication:ERIC: Reports
Date:Nov 1, 2003
Words:334
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