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Fat and fit at 75. (Starting Here).

THE STAFF HERE AT DANCE MAGAZINE HOPES THAT THIS NEW YEAR WILL BE HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS. IT'S A GOOD SIGN THAT THIS FIRST ISSUE OF 2002 IS THE FATTEST BOOK WE'VE EVER PUBLISHED, WHICH SIGNIFIES THE FAITH IN AND DIVERSITY of summer-study programs to come and sightings of exciting performers to check the calendar for.

The year 2002 marks the celebration of Dance Magazine's seventy-fifth anniversary. We'll celebrate all year long, with a bang-up birthday issue in June, but we'll begin this year with a special courtesy one-year subscription to our elders--both those readers who have been loyal and attentive through the years and those who have "retired." It's a jubilee. We're still here, 75 and counting, and if you are too, just ask for your free year of Dance Magazine. (If you have a current subscription, we'll extend it for a year.)

Seventy-five years is a lot of keeping on, keeping flexible, and keeping current. Just think of it. In 1927, the perfume of Anna Pavlova's worldwide ballet tours still was inspiring a generation to dance, and Josephine Baker entranced the Parisians. Isadora Duncan died with the same flamboyance that she had lived. At tea dances and speakeasies, the Charleston craze softened to the slow fox-trot. The Allies withdrew military control of Germany following the "war to end all wars," riots and a general strike took place in Vienna after the acquittal of Nazis for political murder, and on Germany's Black Friday its economic system collapsed. Shortly, Brazil's economy collapsed due to an overproduction of coffee. Charles Lindbergh flew the Spirit of St. Louis nonstop from New York to Paris in 33.5 hours, and other planes first crop-dusted Canadian trees with insecticide. The Holland Tunnel opened vehicular traffic between New York and New Jersey and Great Moffat Tunnel made passing through the Rocky Mountains a safe journey. Sigmund Romberg's operetta about Arab sheiks made "The Desert Song" and "One Alone" popular songs of the day. Jerome Kern and Oscar Hammerstein II debuted Show Boat, now honored as the first real book musical, and Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart penned A Connecticut Yankee (in King Arthur's Court), based on Mark Twain's short novel. The great flood in the Lower Mississippi Valley killed and made homeless uncounted thousands. Women readied themselves to participate for the first time in the Olympic Games in Amsterdam, including Norwegian ice skater Sonja Henie (she was to become three times a gold medalist and ten times world champion), who later brought her skill and grace to a new genre of musical films that merged sport, art, and entertainment.

Out in Hollywood, Al Jolson starred in the first talking movie, The Jazz Singer, and the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences was established. And a woman named Ruth Eleanor Howard founded a monthly magazine called The American Dancer, which through various mergers and acquisitions became Dance Magazine (more about this in an upcoming issue). It is on this genesis that we base our record of unbroken publication since 1927. We are proud of that foundation--sometimes leading, sometimes tracking--and the flexibility and integrity of each successive generation of editors, writers, and photographers who brought you a timely and reliable read. Make a new year's resolution to add one more year to your own dance library. And I invite you to share your own dance memories with me for addition to our jubilee scrapbook. Just send or email them to me at kcpatrick@dancemagazine.com.

Resolutions. A lot has been said about American resolve to remain undefeated since the events of autumn of 2001. Looking back to World War I, when Midwestern farm boys went to fight on European soil, there was a popular song titled "How You Gonna Keep 'Em Down on the Farm After They've Seen Paree?" The jocular lyric spoke not only of a lost innocence of pastoral and tribal habits, but of the increasing complexity of choices, opportunities, and technological sophistication. I thought deeply about this question as we were charmed by the Central African Republic Pygmy singers/dancers of Nzamba Lela, who toured last season with Alonzo King's LINES Ballet. They are doubtless changed forever by their time here. I think also of the American loss of feelings of safety and inviolability following the September 11 terrorist attacks. Perhaps this loss of innocence will not be temporary, but our cultural memories are short. (We have not been free of terrorist attacks in the past three-quarters of a century: presidential assassinations; attacks on banks and information and military centers; explosions of legislative chambers, cars, ships, buildings, and islands. But nothing quite like 9/11.) In every case we have resolved to remain united in our commitment to individual freedom and to help our brothers and sisters as best we can.

Make a resolution, if you already haven't, to stand with and support every part of our dance community. Go see the exciting performers we mention in "25 to Watch" (see pages 54 through 67). Of course, there are lots more to watch: Karen Brown's newly reconstituted Oakland Ballet; Katarzyna Skarpetowska, still outstanding with David Parsons's company for three years now; Desmond Richardson's and Dwight Rhoden's eclectic and excellent Complexions; a year in the United States for the Winter Olympic Games and Arts Festival (Salt Lake City, Utah); the USA International Ballet Competition (Jackson, Mississippi); and Jazz Dance World Congress (Chicago, Illinois). The to-see list is never ending. May it always be so.

Editor in Chief K. C. Patrick has worked for Dance Magazine, both in New York and California, since 1998. After dividing her time between the business world and motherhood, she returned to the arts. She was editor of Dance Teacher Now, a position she held for ten years.
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Title Annotation:Dance Magazine's 75th anniversary
Author:Patrick, K.C.
Publication:Dance Magazine
Article Type:Brief Article
Geographic Code:1USA
Date:Jan 1, 2002
Words:957
Previous Article:January calendar.
Next Article:Inspired by November issue. (Readers' Forum).
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