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Factories producing silicon wristbands supporting the Make Poverty History campaign violated international ethical standards, reports the U.K.'s Guardian.

Factories producing silicon wristbands supporting the Make Poverty History campaign violated international ethical standards, reports the U.K.'s Guardian. An audit revealed that two Chinese manufacturers forced employees to provide deposits in case of broken machinery, violated health and safety standards, and paid less than the minimum wage.

"We are now engaging with the supplier to improve conditions in the factory," noted a spokesman for CAFOD, a British Catholic charity that benefits from the sale of the wristbands, which have been worn by thousands, including British Prime Minister Tony Blair.
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Title Annotation:BAD NEWS
Publication:U.S. Catholic
Date:Sep 1, 2005
Words:91
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