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FY 2012 International Affairs Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO).

OVERSEAS CONTINGENCY OPERATIONS (OCO)
STATE OPERATIONS and FOREIGN ASSISTANCE REQUEST

($000)

                                               FY 2010       FY 2010
                                             Enacted (1)     Actual
                                                            Total (2)

OVERSEAS CONTINGENCY OPERATIONS (OCO)          5,084,922    4,665,468
  TOTAL--STATE OPERATIONS and FOREIGN
  ASSISTANCE

STATE OPERATIONS--OCO                          3,040,489     2,621,035

Administration of Foreign Affairs              3,040,489     2,621,035

Stare Programs                                 2,987,489     2,575,035

Diplomatic and Consular Programs               2,987,489     2,575,035
                                               2,801,263     2,388,809
Ongoing Operations                               186,226       186,226
Worldwide Security Protection                                       --
Other Administration of Foreign Affairs           53,000        46,000
Office of the Inspector General                   53,000        46,000

FOREIGN OPERATIONS--OCO (4)                    2,044,433     2,044,433

Bilateral Economic Assistance--OCO             1,342,433     1,342,433
Economics Support Fund (ESF)                   1,342,433     1,342,433

International Security Assistance--OCO           702,000       702,000
International Narcotics Control and Law          702,000       702,000
  Enforcement (INCLE)
Foreign Military Financing (FMF)                      --            --
Pakistan Counterinsurgency Capability                 --            --
  Fund (PCCF)

                                               FY 2011       FV 2012
                                               CR (3)      President's
                                                             Request

OVERSEAS CONTINGENCY OPERATIONS (OCO)          1,760,454     8,702,787
  TOTAL--STATE OPERATIONS and FOREIGN
  ASSISTANCE

STATE OPERATIONS--OCO                          1,760,454     4,386,187

Administration of Foreign Affairs              1,760,454     4,386,187

Stare Programs                                 1,714,454     4,323,255

Diplomatic and Consular Programs               1,714,454     4,323,255
                                               1,530,211     4,076,401
Ongoing Operations                               184,188       246,854
Worldwide Security Protection
Other Administration of Foreign Affairs           46,000        62,932
Office of the Inspector General                   46,000        62,932

FOREIGN OPERATIONS--OCO (4)                           --     4,316,600

Bilateral Economic Assistance--OCO                    --     1,216,600
Economics Support Fund (ESF)                          --     1,210,600

International Security Assistance--OCO                --     3,100,000
International Narcotics Control and Law               --     1,000,000
  Enforcement (INCLE)
Foreign Military Financing (FMF)                             1,000,000
Pakistan Counterinsurgency Capability                 --     1,100,000
  Fund (PCCF)

                                                Change from
                                              FY 2010 Enacted
                                                 to FY 2012
                                                  Request

OVERSEAS CONTINGENCY OPERATIONS (OCO)               3,617,865
  TOTAL--STATE OPERATIONS and FOREIGN
  ASSISTANCE

STATE OPERATIONS--OCO                               1,345,698

Administration of Foreign Affairs                    1345,698

Stare Programs                                      1,335,766

Diplomatic and Consular Programs                    1,335,766
                                                    1,275,138
Ongoing Operations                                     60,628
Worldwide Security Protection
Other Administration of Foreign Affairs                 9,932
Office of the Inspector General                         9,932

FOREIGN OPERATIONS--OCO (4)                         2,272,167

Bilateral Economic Assistance--OCO                  (125,833)
Economics Support Fund (ESF)                        (125,833)

International Security Assistance--OCO              2,398,000
International Narcotics Control and Law               298,000
  Enforcement (INCLE)
Foreign Military Financing (FMF)                    1,000,000
Pakistan Counterinsurgency Capability               1,100,000
  Fund (PCCF)

Footnotes

(1/) FY 2010 Enacted Total includes the allocations as or March 30,
2010. from the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2010 (P.L. 111-117),
forward Ponding from lhe Supplemental Appropriations Act, 2009 (P.L.
111-32) and supplemental fonding from the Supplemental Appropriations
Act, 2010 (P.L. 111-212). $1.8 billion in forward funding from the
Supplemental Appropriations Act, 2009 (P.L. 111-32) was designated
for FY 2010 and is included in the FY 2010 Rnactcd level. This forward
Tunding includes D&CP Ongoing Operation-$361 million; D&CP WSP: $13.38
million; PSCM; $90.9 million; GHCS: $50 million; INCLR; $94
million; FMF: $1,225.5 million.

(2/) FY 2010 Actual Total includes the allocations as of September
30,2010 from the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2010 (P.L. 111-
117), supplemental funding from the Supplemental Appropriations Act,
2010 (P.L. 111-212), and excludes forward funding from the
Supplemental Appropriations Act, 2009 (P.L. 111-32).

(3/) The FY 2011 CR is based on the annualized continuing resolution
calculation for FY 2011 (P.L 111-322).

(4/) Foreign Assistance levels have not yet been allocated at the
program-country level under the annualized FY 2011 CR (P.L. 111-322).


Overseas Contingency Operations Overview

The Administration's FY 2012 International Affairs budget request includes $8.7 billion for Overseas Contingency Operations to fund the extraordinary and temporary costs for operations and assistance in Iraq, Afghanistan and Pakistan for the Department of State and U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID). This is the first year State and USAID are requesting funds under the Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO) method used by the Department of Defense (DoD) to identify funding requirements for the exceptional costs incurred in these three countries. The FY 2012 OCO request is meant to provide a transparent, whole-of-government approach to these operations and better align the military and civilian costs. The FY 2012 request clearly separates OCO costs, which will be phased out over time, from permanent base budget requirements in the frontline states and elsewhere.

The FY 2012 request reflects the significant and extraordinary resource demands placed on the Department due to the ongoing transition from a military-led to civilian-led mission in Iraq, the early stages of a similar shift in Afghanistan, and the increase in U.S. government civilian responsibilities in Pakistan. The Department of State and USAID FY 2012 OCO request represents a $3.6 billion increase from the FY 2010 estimate of similar costs. That increase is more than offset by the projected reduction in Department of Defense OCO costs, which fall $45 billion from FY 2010. This underscores the government-wide reduction in resource requirements for the frontline states as these transitions occur.

In Iraq, the OCO request will support the U.S. mission of fostering a sovereign, stable, and self-reliant Iraq and the extraordinary costs from the increased Department responsibilities as the military presence decreases. The Department will operate the U.S. Embassy in Baghdad, consulates general in Basrah and Erbil, and Embassy Branch Offices in Mosul and Kirkuk. OCO funds will also support increased diplomatic security as well as continued oversight of U.S.-funded assistance programs and operations through the Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction. The request likewise will support a new civilian-led Police Development and Criminal Justice Program building on the current DoD effort--this program will develop capable Ministry of Interior and civilian police institutions in Iraq and provide support for the judiciary and corrections systems, including funding the Department of Justice presence. It also will fund military assistance to close gaps in the Iraq Security Force's minimum essential capabilities; support the development of enduring logistics capabilities and institutions; and strengthen our long term strategic partnership with Iraq.

In Afghanistan, OCO funding will support efforts to build the capacity of the Afghan government and institutions to counter insurgents and foster transparency and accountability. It will support the continued deployment of civilian experts from the Department of State, USAID, and other U.S. government agencies in Kabul and the provinces.

OCO funds will also support short-term economic assistance programs in Afghanistan with a direct impact on counterinsurgency and stabilization efforts, such as cash-for-work and USAID's sub-national governance and alternative development programs. It will also enhance oversight of U.S-funded assistance programs and operations, through the Office of the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction.

In Pakistan, OCO funds will support the civilian and diplomatic security presence and shift funding for the Pakistan Counterinsurgency Capability Fund (PCCF) from the Department of Defense to the Department of State. The PCCF program equips, trains, and supports Pakistani forces engaged in eliminating insurgent sanctuaries that threaten the stability of the government in Pakistan, security in Afghanistan, and present a danger to the region and the United States.

Diplomatic and Consular Programs--OCO
                                           FY 2010       FY 2010
           ($ in thousands)                Enacted       Actual
                                         Total (1/)    Total (2/)

Ongoing Operations                        2,801,263     2,388,809
Worldwide Security Protection               186,226       186,226
Diplomatic and Consular Programs--OCO     2,987,489     2,575,035

                                           FY 2011       FY 2012
           ($ in thousands)                CR (3/)       Request

Ongoing Operations                        1,530,266     4,076,401
Worldwide Security Protection               184,188       246,854
Diplomatic and Consular Programs--OCO     1,714,454     4,323,255

(1/) FY 2010 Enacted Total reflects the allocations from the
Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2010 (P.L. 111-1171 as of May 2010,
forward funding from the Supplemental Appropriations Act. 2009
(P.L. 111-32), and supplemental funding from the Supplemental
Appropriations Act, 2010 (P.L. 111-212).

(2/) FY 2010 Actual Total reflects the allocations as of September 30,
2010 from the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2010 (P.L. 111-117),
supplemental funding from the Supplemental Appropriations Act, 2010
P.L. 111-212), and includes forward funding from the Supplemental
Appropriations Act, 2009 (P.L. 111-32).

(3/) The FY 2011 CR is based on the annualized continuing resolution
calculation for FY 2011 (P.L. 111-322).


The Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO) request for Diplomatic and Consular Programs (D&CP) totals $4.323 billion. The OCO funding addresses the extraordinary and temporary costs of diplomatic operations in the frontline states of Iraq, Afghanistan, and Pakistan. This funding is critical to achieving U.S. national security goals of the highest priority: establishing a stable, democratic Iraq that will change the strategic landscape of the Middle East and defeating al-Qaida in Afghanistan and Pakistan and eliminating its safe havens.

D&CP--Ongoing Operations

In Iraq, OCO funding of $3.229 billion in D&CP - Ongoing Operations meets requirements for deploying, securing, and supplying the Department's civilian presence in an extremely high-threat environment. As U.S. troops leave Iraq after eight years, the Department will assume responsibility for over 400 essential activities currently performed by DOD, ranging from providing airlift to protecting civilian personnel. The Department will also have primary responsibility for helping the still fragile state develop democratic institutions and build a stable economy. Broadening and deepening engagement with Iraq in the context of the U.S. military-civilian transition will require major personnel and resource commitments for expanded operations. The Department plans to operate the U.S. Embassy in Baghdad, consulates in Basrah and Erbil, and embassy branch offices in Mosul and Kirkuk, with supporting aviation facilities in Basrah, Erbil, and Baghdad. In addition to security costs for these operations, the Department will continue to absorb all logistics, life support, and International Cooperative Administrative Support Services costs for U.S. Government agencies with a minimal presence in Baghdad.

In Afghanistan, OCO funding of $758 million in Ongoing Operations meets requirements for deploying and supplying an increased civilian presence. To consolidate the military gains made in defeating al-Qaida and other extremists, civilians will work to build a more accountable and effective Afghan government that serves its people, generates economic opportunities, and functions with limited international support. Civilians will serve with U.S. military troops in field locations and provide expertise necessary for reconstruction and development as part of the joint military-civilian strategy.

In Pakistan, OCO funding of $89 million in Ongoing Operations addresses the costs associated with enhanced bilateral engagement and a greater civilian presence. The Department will help Pakistan lay the foundations for long-term economic stability and sustainable growth. Civilians will also work with Pakistanis to develop their security capabilities and convince them to systematically confront extremist threats. Funding will support improved coordination and oversight of assistance programs, new communication efforts, strengthened people-to-people tics, and a safe operational platform for U.S. civilian agencies.

D&CP--Worldwide Security Protection

In Afghanistan, OCO funding of $190 million in D&CP--Worldwide Security Protection addresses the increasing security needs of an expanding mission in a war environment. The funding will support a responsible security transition, including transition to the Worldwide Protective Services (WPS) contract awarded in September 2010, the opening of two new consulates in Herat and Mazar-e-Sharif, and the construction of three tactical operations centers at the embassy and consulates.

In Pakistan, OCO funding of $57 million in Worldwide Security Protection likewise provides for overseas protective operations, including Quick Reaction Forces comprised of specially trained Pakistani personnel and funded through the new WPS contract.
Office of Inspector General--OCO

                      FY 2010      FY 2010
                      Enacted      Actual       FY 2011    FY 2012
($ in thousands)      Total (1/)   Total (2/)   CR (3/)    Request

Office of
Inspector
General--OCO          53,000       46,000       46,000     62,932

(1/) FY 2010 Enacted Total reflects the allocations from the
Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2010 (P.L. 111-117) as of May 2010,
forward funding from the Supplemental Appropriations Act. 2009 (P.L.
111-32), and supplemental funding from the Supplemental
Appropriations Act, 2010 (P.L. 111-212).

(2/) FY 2010 Actual Total reflects the allocations as of
September 30, 2010 from the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2010
(P.L. 111-117) and supplemental funding from the Supplemental
Appropriations Act, 2010 (P.L. 111-212).

(3/) The FY 2011 CR is based on the annualized continuing resolution
calculation for FY 2011 (P.L. 111-322).


The OCO request for the Office of Inspector General appropriation totals $63 million. This funding includes $44.4 million for the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR), enabling SIGAR to keep pace with the expanding U.S. reconstruction effort in Afghanistan.

The funding also includes $18.5 million the Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction (SIGIR), reflecting a reduction in the scope of SIGIR's program consistent with the anticipated winding down and termination of its activities.

SIGAR and SIGIR provide oversight of programs and operations funded with amounts appropriated or otherwise made available for the reconstruction of Afghanistan or Iraq, respectively. SIGAR and SIGIR report directly to, and are under the supervision of, the Secretaries of State and Defense.
Economic Support Fund--OCO

                      FY 2010      FY 2010
                      Enacted      Actual       FY 2011    FY 2012
($ in thousands)      Total (1/)   Total (2/)   CR (3/)    Request

Economic Support
Fund--OCO            1,342,433    1,342,433         --     1,216,600

(1/) FY 2010 Enacted Total reflects the allocations from the
Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2010 (P.L. 111-117) as of May 2010,
forward funding from the Supplemental Appropriations Act. 2009 (P.L.
111-32), and supplemental funding from the Supplemental
Appropriations Act, 2010 (P.L. 111-212).

(2/) FY 2010 Actual Total reflects the allocations as of
September 30, 2010 from the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2010
(P.L. 111-117) and supplemental funding from the Supplemental
Appropriations Act, 2010 (P.L. 111-212).

(3/) The FY 2011 CR is based on the annualized continuing resolution
calculation for FY 2011 (P.L. 111-322).


The FY 2012 Economic Support Fund (ESF) request includes funding for Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO) for Afghanistan. ESF OCO funds for Afghanistan will support economic assistance programs that will have a direct counterinsurgency effect.

The requested $1,216.6 million will fund a combination of programs, across multiple sectors that support the counterinsurgency strategy by promoting interventions that will strengthen national and sub-national governance, provide needed services and job opportunities to citizens, while also laying the groundwork for lasting solutions.

In FY 2012, ESF OCO resources will be used to fund programs that have an immediate impact on counterinsurgency efforts. Funding will support the work being carried out by the provincial reconstruction teams (PRTs). These programs will include cash-for-work programs in the south and cast that promote stability through temporary employment and income generation for targeted populations who may be vulnerable to joining the insurgency. They will also provide support to families and communities who have suffered from military operations and also generate short-term job opportunities or quick impact projects following a clearing operation of the military.

ESF OCO funds also will support the counternarcotics strategy for Afghanistan. These funds will support the alternative development programs which will continue to focus on reducing illegal crop production through alternative livelihoods programs that improve economic opportunities in rural areas, expand the range of licit choices available to Afghan farmers, and reduce dependency on illicit opium production. To incentivize Afghan farmers to abandon poppy, USAID will focus resources toward licit income generation and job creation programs that give Afghan farmers a broader range of livelihood choices. Due to the nexus of the narcotics industry and the insurgency, providing alternatives to poppy production is critical to the stabilization of Afghanistan.

In addition to these areas, FY 2012 ESF OCO will fund the strategic communications program whose core objective is countering extremist voices and building Afghan communication capacity. To help break the cycle of skepticism and apathy, the requested resources will focus on establishing and solidifying effective communications between and among the Afghan people, the Afghan Government, and the people and governments of the United States and Coalition partners.

Finally, ESF OCO funds will support large infrastructure programs. These projects are the lifeline economic activity requires to prosper and upon which the country will rely as it transitions to long-term development. The infrastructure programs represent a concerted civil-military effort that unites DoD and ESF funds in the Afghanistan Infrastructure Program (AIP) to achieve shared objectives. Under the AIP, DoD resources from the Afghanistan Infrastructure Fund (AIF) arc oriented to infrastructure in key terrain districts (KTDs) that require greater COIN impacts, by providing fuel and expanding power, transport, and water services in southern and eastern provinces. ESF OCO resources are focused to support the broader energy security needs of the nation, developing indigenous power production and expanding power transmission capability, reliability and efficiency. Therefore, the ESF OCO resources will serve as the bridge from short-term temporary solutions provided through AIF funding to long-term sustainable solutions that arc required to both keep the insurgency defeated but also guarantee sustained economic growth.

International Narcotics and Law Enforcement--OCO
                      FY 2010      FY 2010
                      Enacted      Actual       FY 2011    FY 2012
($ in thousands)      Total (1/)   Total (2/)   CR (3/)    Request

International
Narcotics and Law
Enforcement--OCO      702,000      702,000      --         1,000,000

(1/) FY 2010 Enacted Total reflects the allocations from the
Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2010 (P.L. 111-117) as of May 2010,
forward funding from the Supplemental Appropriations Act. 2009 (P.L.
111-32), and supplemental funding from the Supplemental
Appropriations Act, 2010 (P.L. 111-212).

(2/) FY 2010 Actual Total reflects the allocations as of
September 30, 2010 from the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2010
(P.L. 111-117) and supplemental funding from the Supplemental
Appropriations Act, 2010 (P.L. 111-212).

(3/) The FY 2011 CR is based on the annualized continuing resolution
calculation for FY 2011 (P.L. 111-322).


The FY 2012 International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement (INCLE) request includes funding for Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO) for Iraq. The request of $1,000 million will support a full year of operations of the Police Development Program (PDP) in Iraq. The PDP, designed as a strong successor to the United States military police training program, will increase the ability of the Ministry of Interior and the Iraqi Police Services to manage and sustain the full range of policing operations and ensure that civilian police have primacy for providing Iraq's internal security. This effort will support and protect U.S. strategic interests in the region by promoting democracy and the rule of law, discouraging corruption and sectarian behavior, and assisting in the development of a sovereign, stable and self-reliant Iraq.

The PDP will include approximately 190 advisors, based in three hub cities (Baghdad, Basrah, and Erbil), who will travel to approximately 30 Government of Iraq critical 'spoke' sites in an estimated ten provinces. Th e advisors will help to build capacity in higher-level management and leadership through on-site mentoring, advising, and training. The PDP will focus on advancing specialized policing skills such as criminal investigations, forensics, and border security for Iraqi officials at all levels as appropriate, working with the Department of Justice (DOJ) (e.g., the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF), the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), and the U.S. Marshals Service) and the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) (e.g., U.S. Customs and Border Protection and U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement). In addition, the program will fund Iraqi officers to attend United States-based training at policing academies and those facilities operated by the FBI, DEA, ATF, and DHS or other international police training venues such as the International Law Enforcement Academies. The PDP also includes a robust instructor-development program and supports training at regional and national Iraqi academics to ensure a uniform training standard throughout the country.

The PDP is complemented by robust rule of law programs for integrated criminal justice sector development. The DOJ/FBI-led joint Government of Iraq-United States Government Major Crimes Task Force will provide U.S. law enforcement agents who will work closely with Iraqi investigators, building capacity to investigate high profile crimes such as terrorism, public corruption, kidnapping, human trafficking, and organized crime. DOJ also will participate with a number of other implementers in efforts to build communication between the provincial courts and the central courts in Baghdad, resolving roadblocks in the Iraqi legal system, and helping develop the Higher Judicial Council's administrative capacity.

Funds will also support capacity-building work in the justice sector by addressing judicial and courthouse security, administrative processes, and investigative practices. The corrections program will build advanced skills in senior leaders at post-trial corrections facilities and begin to reform Iraq's 1,200 jails and detention centers for pre-trial detainees. A demand reduction program will support education and technical development to provide prevention and treatment services and implement a nationwide drug demand reduction strategy. Funds will also support a very substantial anti-corruption, anti-money laundering, and anti-terrorist financing program, working with the Commission on Integrity, the Inspectors General, and the Central Bank of Iraq.

In addition to providing criminal justice sector programmatic support, funds will pay for Embassy-provided security and life support, aviation, and other transportation operations and maintenance, and personnel recruitment and training.

Foreign Military Financing--OCO
                      FY 2010      FY 2010
                      Enacted      Actual       FY 2011    FY 2012
($ in thousands)      Total (1/)   Total (2/)   CR (3/)    Request

Foreign Military
Financing--OCO            --         --           --      1,000,000

(1/) FY 2010 Enacted Total reflects the allocations from the
Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2010 (P.L. 111-117) as of May 2010,
forward funding from the Supplemental Appropriations Act. 2009 (P.L.
111-32), and supplemental funding from the Supplemental
Appropriations Act, 2010 (P.L. 111-212).

(2/) FY 2010 Actual Total reflects the allocations as of
September 30, 2010 from the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2010
(P.L. 111-117) and supplemental funding from the Supplemental
Appropriations Act, 2010 (P.L. 111-212).

(3/) The FY 2011 CR is based on the annualized continuing resolution
calculation for FY 2011 (P.L. 111-322).


The FY 2012 Foreign Military Financing (FMF) request includes funding for Overseas Contingency Operations for Iraq. This request reflects the transition of responsibility for military assistance programs from the Department of Defense to the Department of State. These programs have been funded in the past through the Iraq Security Forces Fund. FMF funding for Iraq will ensure sustainment of advances that Iraq has made in assuming responsibility for its own security.

The request of $1,000 million will support the continued development of the Iraqi military until the Iraqis become self-sufficient, which is critical to Iraq's full assumption of security responsibilities and will provide an important vehicle for cementing the United States' enduring partnership with Iraq during an important period of transition.

The requested funding for FY 2012 broadly focuses on helping the Iraqis increase the capacity and professionalism of the Iraqi military and builds upon the efforts made since 2003 by the United States military, Coalition forces, and Iraqi military operations and initiatives. The FMF program will parallel the stand up of the Office of Security Cooperation in Iraq and will help ensure that a strong relationship is in place as Iraq continues to use its own fiscal resources to contribute to peace and security in the region. The program will be focused on closing gaps in the Iraq Security Force's minimum essential capabilities, supporting the development of enduring logistics capabilities and institutions to sustain U.S. and Iraqi post-war investments, and strengthening the United States' long-term strategic partnership with Iraq.

Pakistan Counterinsurgency Capability Fund--OCO
                      FY 2010      FY 2010
                      Enacted      Actual       FY 2011    FY 2012
($ in thousands)      Total (1/)   Total (2/)   CR (3/)    Request

Pakistan
Counterinsurgency
Capability               --          --           --      1,100,000

(1/) FY 2010 Enacted Total reflects the allocations from the
Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2010 (P.L. 111-117) as of May 2010,
forward funding from the Supplemental Appropriations Act. 2009 (P.L.
111-32), and supplemental funding from the Supplemental
Appropriations Act, 2010 (P.L. 111-212).

(2/) FY 2010 Actual Total reflects the allocations as of
September 30, 2010 from the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2010
(P.L. 111-117) and supplemental funding from the Supplemental
Appropriations Act, 2010 (P.L. 111-212).

(3/) The FY 2011 CR is based on the annualized continuing resolution
calculation for FY 2011 (P.L. 111-322).


The Pakistan Counterinsurgency Capability Fund (PCCF) is critical to supporting Pakistan's security forces engaged in counterinsurgency (COIN) operations against militant extremists in the Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA) and Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa. PCCF helps Pakistan's security forces develop the military capabilities needed to engage in operations which reduces extremist access to safe havens in the border regions from which attacks on U.S. and international forces in Afghanistan arc planned and executed. The FY 2012 PCCF request of $1,100 million will continue to accelerate the development of the Pakistan security forces' capacity to secure its borders with Afghanistan, deny safe haven to extremists, fight insurgents, and provide security for the local population. A more capable security force will facilitate the efforts of the Government of Pakistan to improve basic government services in areas vulnerable to extremists, supported by a robust U.S. civilian assistance strategy and funding.

PCCF funding will enhance the capabilities of the Pakistan Army, the Pakistan Special Services Group, the Pakistan Air Force, and the Frontier Corps in the following key areas: air mobility; night operations; counter-improvised explosive devices; command and control; intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance; close air support; joint fires; intelligence driven operations; combat logistics and sustainment; and civil-military operations. Funding will provide a combination of infrastructure enhancements, equipment, and counter-insurgency related training. In addition, training and equipment for the FATA Levy forces will continue with modest PCCF funding.

Highlights:

* Funding will support the critical development of air mobility assets. Army aviators and maintenance technicians will be trained in helicopter combat operations, resupply, and maintenance procedures, increasing their ability to support and sustain ground combat operations. Pilots will receive training in night operations, precision targeting, close air support, and in the use of special munitions in support of the ground fight.

* Funding will support the continued development of distributed intelligence fusion centers that allow Pakistan to better receive and fuse data from various intelligence collection sources, which will allow for better planning and execution of counterinsurgency operations. Funds will also support the development of Frontier Corps sector headquarters, which are used to coordinate patrolling and monitoring of operations, and Frontier Corps training facilities, which build and maintain proficiency on counterinsurgency tactics, techniques, and procedures.

* Equipment will be provided to battalion-sized units to enhance and modernize the communications, logistical support, night vision, air mobility, and air support infrastructure of Pakistan's security forces, leading to more effective COIN operations and the reduction of collateral damage.

* Training will be provided to Pakistan's security forces in COIN doctrine and in conducting civil-military operations such as humanitarian assistance and relief operations.
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Title Annotation:FUNCTION 150 & OTHER INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS
Publication:Budget Requests
Geographic Code:1USA
Date:Jun 16, 2011
Words:4443
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