Printer Friendly

FOR MILLIONS OF AMERICANS HOME IS WHERE THE 'PAYCHECK' IS

 TORRANCE, Calif., Aug. 31 /PRNewswire/ -- When the business realities of the recession-prone 90s hit Noramae Munster, she refused to become a statistic in the unemployment office. Instead, she became part of an even bigger statistic -- one of the millions of laid-off workers who have opened their own business.
 "One day I was out of work, and the next day I was printing business cards," said Munster, whose home-based graphic design firm in San Pedro, Calif., grew five times its initial size in one year.
 According to BIS Strategic Decisions, a leading international organization of industry analysts, people like Munster, who suffer layoffs or voluntarily leave corporations to work from home, account for more than 12 million home office workers.
 BIS projects more than 39 million Americans will work from home in 1993.
 "The sluggish economy is forcing companies to cut costs by either laying off employees or turning full-time jobs into part-time positions," said Jon Hulak at BIS. "As a result, the home office industry is experiencing steady growth."
 The segment of the home office industry that has seen the most growth is telecommuting -- working for one employer full- or part-time from home.
 "Prompted by portable computers, faxes and sophisticated telephones, telecommuting will continue to be the fastest growing segment in the home office industry," said Jim Oblak, vice president of marketing for PhoneMate Inc., a leading manufacturer of answering machines and cordless telephones.
 The latest data shows that 4.5 million people in the United States now telecommute at least part-time, a 15 percent increase from last year. Hulak estimates that more than 7 million people will be telecommuting by 1996.
 The advantages of telecommuting extend to both the employer and the employee.
 Telecommuting improves productivity, cuts commuter driving time and consequent air pollution, and reduces office space requirements, Hulak said. It also allows companies to keep skilled workers who might otherwise need to stop working, such as new parents.
 Telecommuting is also popular among those who work off-site: according to Home Office Computing, 96 percent of the people who work from home would recommend it to someone else.
 Munster would agree, providing the home office is properly set up.
 "Every home office should have a phone, answering machine and facsimile to start with," said Munster. "They are essential to the way people do business."
 Most experts agree, when it comes to purchasing business equipment, consumers should rely on well-known brands.
 "Home office workers really don't need to spend a lot on business equipment," said Oblak. "With a little research, outfitting a modern home office can cost as little as $2,200."
 -0- 9/1/93 R
 /CONTACT: Lisa Verbeck of Bob Thomas & Associates, 310-314-6600/ CO: PhoneMate ST: California IN: HOU SU:


LV -- NYOFNS1 -- 7735 09/01/93 06:47 EDT
COPYRIGHT 1993 PR Newswire Association LLC
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1993 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Sep 1, 1993
Words:462
Previous Article:UTILICORP CONFIRMS INITIAL PUBLIC OFFERING FOR PORTION OF AQUILA GAS PIPELINE CORPORATION
Next Article:EXPANDING HOME OFFICE WORK FORCE CREATES NEED FOR HOME OFFICE FURNITURE

Terms of use | Copyright © 2016 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters