Printer Friendly

FOR LIPSKY, IT ALL ADDS UP.

Byline: Jill Painter GOLF

David Lipsky made the cut in the Los Angeles City Junior Championships at Griffith Park. He earned a three-day weekend and an excused absence from La Canada High of La Canada Flintridge on a Monday to play in the final round.

Lipsky, however, made the cut by only one stroke and figured he didn't have a shot to win the tournament. He decided it was more important to be at his advanced placement Calculus class than on a golf course.

He ditched golf, not school.

Even though he's a fine golfer - and headed to Northwestern on a partial scholarship - Lipsky's studies come first.

"Golf is important," Lipsky said. "I'm not saying it isn't. You should have your priorities. Finishing a tournament and not doing anything or going to school, it was an easy decision. You can't make golf more important."

Many kids do and Lipsky meets them nearly every weekend. He plans on majoring in economics next fall. And taking a minor in golf.

Ten days ago, Lipsky, a senior, was supposed to participate in what is basically one of the AJGA's majors. Again, he couldn't miss Calculus. So, Lipsky, a 4.0 student, missed the trip to Mesa, Ariz.

Making a 50-foot putt on an undulated green is tricky. But negotiating a Calculus equation can be more taxing.

"It's tough, but I'm working my way through it," Lipsky said of the math class he decided to take just because he wanted to.

When he took an SAT preparatory class, it fell on a Saturday, so he had to cancel his weekly golf lesson.

"School is really important," David said. "I can't only be about golf. There's a little chance that I'd become a professional golfer. I want to but it's really hard. You have to find a way to balance everything."

He did just that last summer. He and his father Aaron, who is semi-retired, traveled around the country. Lipsky took a tour of junior golf tournaments in cities where he was thinking about going to college. Most of the visits were unofficial.

He played in California, Oregon, Washington, Arizona, New Mexico, Kansas, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania. He checked out NYU, the University of Pennsylvania, Northwestern and Cal among others. And, he had a chance to meet new people and bond with his father.

"It's been such a wonderful thing," Aaron Lipsky said. "It was a fun experience. We got to see a lot. And he made so many friends, friends he'll have for the rest of his life."

He saw the Liberty Bell, Valley Forge and attended the second round of the PGA Championship at Baltusrol Golf Club in Springfield, New Jersey. He went with one of his buddies from the AJGA.

Lipsky can hit 290 yards off the tee. His accuracy is there, but he could use some work with his short game. Who couldn't?

He shot a 65 in the first round of a tournament in Connecticut last summer, which peaked the interest of more college coaches. Initially, there was just interest from NYU, Columbia and Northwestern. After that, Pac-10 schools started calling.

He was set to attend Cal after an official visit but he'd promised to keep his scheduled visit to Northwestern.

Then he was sold.

It had been a long time coming. David played 30 tournaments a year from age 10-14 with a dream that he'd play college golf. Golf instructors told Aaron that David was getting a late start as a 10-year-old. Other boys had experience over David, but that didn't matter.

"The idea of junior golf is to give you an edge on education," Aaron said. "If you're fairly decent playing golf, it gives you an edge on getting into a good school. Whether it's baseball or football and you're good at it, it's a tremendous edge. It puts the ball in your court. You pick the school."

David Lipsky usually can be found playing at Wood Ranch Golf Club, his home course. He takes days off, too, like he did Sunday to hang out with his friends.

Soon, he'll try for a three-peat as the individual medalist at the Rio Hondo League Championships. He's a slam dunk to win again.

In February, David had a chance to meet PGA Tour pro Luke Donald. Northwestern coach Pat Goss called his latest recruit and told him he should follow Donald - a Northwestern product - in his practice round at the Nissan Open at Riviera Country Club.

"He was smart and intelligent, a really nice guy," David said. "It was one of the best learning experiences I've had when I walked with Luke and saw what he did. More than anything, just watching pros and the way they practice and carry themselves. It's really interesting."

Donald shared tips and laughs with the Lipskys. And Donald's play around the green gave David a new appreciation for his craft. Donald is well-rounded and is an accomplished painter.

"What sets me apart from pros is the short game," David said. "When they're around the green, they make shots from everywhere, shots I knew that I couldn't hit and knew I had to learn. That sets people apart from being professional and not."

David Lipsky knows a little something about setting himself apart from the pack.

CAPTION(S):

box

Box:

ON THE GREEN
COPYRIGHT 2006 Daily News
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 2006, Gale Group. All rights reserved. Gale Group is a Thomson Corporation Company.

 
Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Title Annotation:Sports
Publication:Daily News (Los Angeles, CA)
Date:Apr 19, 2006
Words:894
Previous Article:WALBERG GETS PEPPERDINE JOB WAVES TAKE CHANCE ON JC COACH.
Next Article:IT'S A DREW DAY FOR THE DODGERS OUTFIELDER DRIVES IN BOTH RUNS, INCLUDING GAME-WINNER IN NINTH DODGERS 2, CHICAGO 1.


Related Articles
BUS, RAIL STRIKE ON HOLD.
UNION SETS A DEADLINE FOR WALKOUT.
RIDERS, MTA DISPUTE CROWDING; COURT TO DECIDE IF MTA VIOLATES LIMITS FOR NUMBERS STILL STANDING ON BUSES.
MTA COULD AVOID HIKING FARES, BOARD TOLD.
MTA TO ADD FUNDS FOR LAPD PATROLS.
MAN TO SERVE TIME IN KILLING OF LANDLORD.
VALENCIA GOLFER EDUCATES STUDENTS.

Terms of use | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2018 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters