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FMI 2003 shopping trends survey sheds light on consumer habits. (Trends).

The Food Marketing Institute's Trends in the United States: Consumer Attitudes and the Supermarket 2003 report offers valuable consumer statistics:

The percentage of food dollars spent at a consumer's primary store declined from 89 percent last year to 82 percent, with consumers reporting more shopping visits to alternative formats, such as dollar stores and warehouse clubs.

Shoppers are satisfied with their primary supermarkets, giving their stores an average rating of 8.1 on a 10-point scale.

High-quality meats, normally one of the top-three features consumers rank as very important in selecting a supermarket, fell to fourth place, replaced by low prices. A clean and neat store and high-quality produce topped the chart.

Self-scanning is now offered in 29 percent of supermarkets, with 53 percent of shoppers using the service at least once per month where it is available to them.

90% of supermarkets carry private-label or store brands, and usage of these products remains constant from last year at 87 percent. Only 5 percent say they never purchase these products.

7 out of 10 shoppers ages 25 to 39 purchase ethnic foods at least once per month. Usage decreases with age to less than four in 10 shoppers 65 years or older.

53% of shoppers say they are concerned about nutrition, and 98 percent say they take some sort of action to ensure their diet is healthy. Eating more fruits and vegetables is the most common means consumers believe will ensure a healthy diet.

57% percent indicate that "certified organic" labels are very or somewhat important to them when purchasing a product.

Twenty-six percent, up from 22 percent, of consumers have shifted food safety responsibility to government organizations. However, 30 percent still place the primary responsibility upon themselves. Approximately 17 percent indicate they rely most on retailers, and 21 percent rely on manufacturers to ensure the safety of the food they purchase.

Fifty-seven percent say they would be interested in irradiation as a food safety solution. Only 2 percent, however, have purchased this product.
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Title Annotation:Food Marketing Institute's Trends in the United States: Consumer Attitudes and the Supermarket 2003
Comment:FMI 2003 shopping trends survey sheds light on consumer habits. (Trends).(Food Marketing Institute's Trends in the United States: Consumer Attitudes and the Supermarket 2003)
Publication:Agri Marketing
Geographic Code:1USA
Date:Jul 1, 2003
Words:334
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