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FIRST ONE-TABLET, ONCE-A-DAY QUINOLONE FOR ALL INDICATIONS ENTERS $5.1 BILLION U.S. ANTI-INFECTIVE MARKET

 FIRST ONE-TABLET, ONCE-A-DAY QUINOLONE FOR ALL INDICATIONS ENTERS
 $5.1 BILLION U.S. ANTI-INFECTIVE MARKET
 CHICAGO, Feb. 24 /PRNewswire/ -- Searle announced today that its new quinolone antibacterial agent, Maxaquin(R) (lomefloxacin HCI), has been approved for marketing in the United States.
 Maxaquin represents a significant advance in anti-infective therapy as the first one-tablet, once-a-day, broad-spectrum quinolone indicated for complicated and uncomplicated urinary tract infections (UTIs) and acute bacterial exacerbations of chronic bronchitis caused by H. influenzae and M. catarrhalis, the two most prevalent bacteria associated with this lower respiratory infection. Maxaquin is not indicated for use when this condition is caused by S. pneumoniae. Maxaquin also is the first oral antimicrobial agent indicated to reduce infectious complications that can follow the post-operative period (three to five days) of transurethral surgery.
 "Because of its product attributes, we believe Maxaquin will become a major contributor in the quinolone segment of the anti-infective market," said Joseph T. Curti, M.D., Searle executive vice president of North American Operations.
 According to Ira Klimberg, M.D., a clinical investigator from the University of Florida in Gainesville and the Urology Center of Florida, "From a clinical standpoint, Maxaquin could be a very attractive therapeutic option by offering dramatic cost savings compared to intravenous antibiotics as well as a simplication of treatment regimens when used in reducing infectious complications following transurethral surgery."
 The new agent offers physicians a drug with a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity that is sufficiently long-acting to be dosed once a day for all of its uses.
 "Lack of compliance with a prescribed course of antibacterial therapy often leads to treatment failures and may contribute to the emergence of resistant strains of bacteria, particularly when doses are missed or therapy is not completed," said Klimberg.
 "Once-a-day medications clearly improve patients' ability to comply with their antibacterial regimen," said Curti. "We believe Maxaquin's one-strength, one-tablet dosing schedule for all indications will simplify therapy and help patients remember to take their medication."
 The drug also has the advantage that it has not been shown to interact with theophylline in a clinically significant way. With some quinolones, this interaction can increase the risk of theophylline- related adverse reactions. Theophylline is widely used for such breathing disorders as chronic bronchitis, asthma, and emphysema and accounts for approximately 26 million prescriptions in the United States annually.
 According to a 1990 report from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, there were nearly eight million physician visits for urinary tract infections and approximately 1.6 million hospitalizations for UTIs in 1985. The corresponding total cost of treating UTIs was $4.4 billion. Among the most common bacterial infections in the United States, UTIs are second only to respiratory infections.
 Nearly 12 million Americans suffer with chronic bronchitis, according to a national health survey published in 1989 by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Patients with chronic bronchitis are at high risk of developing acute bacterial infections that often require treatment with a broad-spectrum antibacterial agent.
 Like other quinolones, Maxaquin is not for use in children under 18 years or in pregnant women, and the most frequent side effects are minor and mainly nausea, headache, dizziness and photosensitivity. Maxaquin is Searle's new entry into the fast growing and highly competitive U.S. anti-infective marketplace. Within this market, the quinolones are the fastest growing class of antibiotics.
 The drug is currently available in Japan, Ireland, Brazil, Mexico, Italy, Portugal, Venezuela, and Argentina. Searle is awaiting approval in 20 countries worldwide, including the United Kingdom and France.
 Searle is a research-based pharmaceutical company that develops, manufactures and markets prescription pharmaceuticals worldwide. It is a wholly owned subsidiary of Monsanto Company (NYSE: MTC).
 -0- 2/24/92
 /CONTACT: Paul Laland, 708-470-6584, or Laura Leber, 708-470-6280, both of G.D. Searle & Co./
 (MTC) CO: G.D. Searle & Co. ST: Illinois IN: MTC SU:


SM-OS -- NY063 -- 2016 02/24/92 15:43 EST
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Date:Feb 24, 1992
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