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FIRST BRIT KILLED BY EBOLA VIRUS; SCREENING U-TURN PASSENGERS TO HAVE HEALTH TESTS AT AIRPORTS.

Byline: JASON BEATTIE reporters@dailyrecord.co.uk

A BRITON with suspected Ebola has died in Macedonia.

The 58-year-old was admitted to hospital yesterday afternoon suffering from a fever, vomiting and internal bleeding. He died hours later.

A second Briton, who had been staying with the man in a hotel in he capital Skopje, was also feared to have caught the virus.

Local authorities sealed off the hotel, keeping staff and the patient inside. Health officials made sure he was in isolation.

The two men had arrived in Skopje from the UK on Thursday last week.

Blood samples from the dead Briton have been sent to Germany for tests to confirm the cause of death.

The scare came as Downing Street did a U-turn and announced that travellers arriving in the UK from West Africa will face health screenings.

Earlier yesterday, Defence Minister Michael Fallon said he did not think it was necessary.

But hours later, the Government rushed out plans to screen anyone arriving at London Gatwick and Heathrow airports and on Eurostar from Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea.

The passengers will have to give details about their travel history, who they have been in contact with and their onward travel plans.

They could also have to undergo health tests carried out by medical staff.

A Downing Street spokesman said: "Advice from the Chief Medical Officer Dame Sally Davies today is that enhanced screening arrangements at the UK's main ports of entry for people travelling from the affected regions will offer an additional level of protection to the UK."

The spokesman said that although the risk to the public in Britain was "very low", the Government were drawing up contingency plans for a possible major outbreak.

This included a "national exercise and wider resilience training to ensure the UK is fully prepared".

The Ebola virus has now claimed 3800 lives.

Dame Sally said: "Although the risk to the UK remains low, in view of the concern about the growing number of cases, it is right to consider what further measures could be taken.

"We remain alert and prepared should an Ebola case be identified here."

Pressure mounted on David Cameron to act after the US announced health screening was being brought in at five major airports.

It came as a senior US health official said the Ebola outbreak was the biggest medical crisis since HIV/AIDS.

Thomas Frieden, director of thomas Frieden, director of the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention said: "In the 30 years I've been working in public health, the only thing like this has been AIDS. It is going to be a long fight."

" There are more than 40" There are more than 40 flights a day to the UK from West Africa, but no direct flights from Sierra Leone, Liberia and Guinea, which are at the centre of the outbreak.

Labour MP Keith Vaz, chairman of the Commons Home Affairs Committee, welcomed the rethink on screening.

Commons Home Affairs Committee, welcomed the rethink on screening.

He added: "A virus does not wait for a direct flight. The public need to be satisfied and convinced we are doing everything we can."

a direct flight. The public need to be satisfied and convinced we are doing everything we can."

Shadow Health Secretary Andy Burnham had also called for passenger screening.

Shadow Health Secretary Andy Burnham had also called for passenger screening.

He said: "The public and airport staff want to know that the Government are doing everything they can to prevent this terrible disease from reaching the UK."

He said: "The public and airport staff want to know that the Government are doing everything they can to prevent this terrible disease from reaching the UK."

But Professor George Griffin, chairman of the advisory committee on dangerous pathogens, who advise But Professor George Griffin, chairman of the advisory committee on dangerous pathogens, who advise the Government, warned that testing travellers for signs of fever was likely to be ineffective. He said: "We know the clinical course of the disease very well - a maximum incubation period of 21 days and fever is only part of the clinical syndrome at the end of that period."

And Professor David Mabey, of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, said he believes questionnaires asking passengers about their travel arrangements would be a "wate of time".

He added: "I think people will lie. They don't want to be subjected to the inconvenience. Why would people tell the truth? "If last week your aunt died of Ebola but you feel fine, are you going to be honest when you get to the airport and risk being detained and missing your holiday? "Or if you do admit to being in contact with Ebola sufferers but you test negative, will you be isolated or sent home anyway? To my mind, the key issue is if you have been in contact with someone with Ebola and develop symptoms, then you go somewhere where you can be put in isolation and treated.

"The public need to know where that is."

Travellers from West Africa will be screened when they arrive at New York's John F. Kennedy airport, Newark Liberty in New Jersey, Washington Dulles, Chicago O'Hare and Hartsfield-Jackson, in Atlanta.

Passengers will have to take temperature tests and answer a health questionnaire.

This week, a Spanish nurse became the first person to contract Ebola outside of West Africa.

Teresa Romero, 40, caught the virus from a patient she was treating in a hospital in Madrid. Yesterday, her brother said her condition had deteriorated and she was now being helped with her breathing in hospital.

Two doctors who treated Romero are under observation at the Carlos III hospital. It brings to six the total number of people under quarantine at the hospital.

Professor Peter Piot, part of a team who first identified Ebola in 1976, yesterday warned that more European cases were unavoidable.

Piot, who is a director of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, said: "We will see other cases in Europe. People travel, people come back, people get infected in West Africa - volunteers. So we need to be prepared for more cases like this."

An Australian nurse who developed a fever when she returned home after working with the Red Cross in Sierra Leone has tested negative for Ebola.

Victim dies in hospital and companion has symptoms SPAIN IS could use bug as biological weapon EBOLA could be used as a suicide biological weapon against the UK.

Military experts fear terrorist group IS could send infected militants to western countries to spread the virus.

Captain Al Shimkus, professor of National Security Affairs at the US Naval War College, said: "In the context of terrorist activity, it doesn't take much sophistication to go to that next step to use a human being as a carrier of the virus."

Prof Anthony Glees, of Buckingham " Univer sity's centre for security and intelligence studies, said: "It's is a potential job for a suicide mission."

IN CLEAR Sue Ellen Kovack ran a fever after working for the Red Cross in Sierra Leone. But she tested negative for Ebola

A virus does not wait for a direct flight. The public need to be convinced we are doing everything we can KEITH VAZ

CAPTION(S):

PREPA PA P RED Medic in protection suit

FEARS Teresa Romero's condition had deteriorated yesterday. She caught Ebola from a patient she was treating
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Publication:Daily Record (Glasgow, Scotland)
Geographic Code:4EUUK
Date:Oct 10, 2014
Words:1238
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