Printer Friendly

FIRST ADD TO MERCK ANNOUNCES PROGRAM FOR PATIENTS ON PROSCAR

 /FIRST ADD -- PH011 -- MERCK'S PROSCAR/
 MERCK ANNOUNCES PROGRAM FOR PATIENTS ON PROSCAR
 Through their physicians, all patients who are prescribed Proscar will be eligible to enroll in The Patient Support Program for Proscar, Merck & Co., Inc., announced today.
 After six months of therapy with Proscar, each patient participating in the program will receive a certificate for a complimentary 30-day supply of medication. After that, participating patients will receive similar certificates every 12 months until at least 1995. Patients will also receive periodic health information, including a newsletter.
 This program complements the availability of an initial 30-day supply of medication for all new patients who are prescribed Proscar.
 National Physicians Network for Proscar
 The following physicians were involved in clinical investigations of Proscar (finasteride) and are available for media interviews.
 -- Lisa Tenover, M.D., Emory University, Div. of Geriatric Medicine, Wesley Woods Hosp., 1821 Clifton Rd. NE, ATLANTA, GA 30329-5102, 404-728-6331
 -- Perry B. Hudson, M.D., VA Med. Center, Univ. of South Florida, BAY PINES, FL 33704, 813-398-6661, ext. 5486
 -- John T. Grayhack, M.D., Northwestern Memorial Hosp., Jennings Room 618, 707 North Fairbanks Court, CHICAGO, IL 60611, 312-908-8600
 -- Martin T. Resnick, M.D., Univ. of Urologists, of Cleveland, Inc., 2065 Adelbert Road, Lakeside Bldg., Room 7112, CLEVELAND, OH 44106, 216-844-3011
 -- Glenn R. Cunningham, M.D., ACOS, Research & Development, VA Med. Center, 2002 Holcombe Blvd., HOUSTON, TX 77211, 713-794-7566
 -- Sidney Rosenblatt, M.D., Irvine Clinical Research Center, 16300 Sand Canyon Ave., Suite 601, IRVINE, CA 97218, 714-753-1663
 -- Reginald Bruskewitz, M.D., Univ. of Wisconsin, Clinical Science Center, 600 Highland Ave., MADISON, WI 53792, 608-263-1358
 -- Clair E. Cox II, M.D., Dept. of Urology, Univ. of Tennessee, Center 956 Court, Suite H216, MEMPHIS, TN 38163, 901-523-5868
 -- Harold Fuselier, M.D., Ochsner Clinic, 1514 Jefferson Highway, NEW ORLEANS, LA 70121, 504-838-4083
 -- Nicholas Romas, M.D., St. Lukes Roosevelt Hospital, Center 428 West 59th St., NEW YORK, NY 10019, 212-523-7788, 212-523-4000
 -- Darracott Vaughan, M.D., New York Hosp., Cornell Univ. Med. Center, Dept. of Urology, F-900, 525 East 68th St., NEW YORK, NY 10021, 212-746-5480
 -- Paul Schellhammer, M.D., Devine-Fiveash Urology, Ltd., Hague Med. Center, 400 W. Brambleton Ave., NORFOLK, VA 23510, 804-628-2409
 -- Johnny B. Roy, M.D., Univ. of Oklahoma, Health Science Center, Urology Dept., P.O. Box 26901, 920 Stanton L. Young Blvd., OKLAHOMA CITY, OK 73190, 405-271-6900
 -- E. James Seidmon, M.D., Temple Univ. Hosp., Dept. of Urology, 3401 North Broad St., PHILADELPHIA, PA 19140, 215-221-3375
 -- Michael Lieber, M.D., Dept. of Urology, Mayo Clinic E-17, ROCHESTER, MN 55905, Public Affairs office, 507-284-2430
 -- Jack Geller, M.D., Mercy Hosp. and Med. Center, Department of Med. Education, 4077 Fifth Ave., SAN DIEGO, CA 92103-2180, 619-260-7215
 -- Perinchery Narayan, M.D., VA Med. Center, 112F, 4150 Clement St., SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94121, 415-750-2103
 -- William Bremner, M.D., Chief, Med. Service, Seattle VA Med. Center, 1660 South Columbian Way, SEATTLE, WA 98108, 206-764-2345
 -- Gerald L. Andriole, M.D., Associate Professor, Div. of Urologic Surgery, Washington Univ. School of Med., 4960 Childrens Place, ST. LOUIS, MO 63110, 314-362-8212
 -- Lloyd H. Harrison, M.D., Dept. of Surgery, Div. of Urology, Bowman-Gray School of Med., 300 South Hawthorne Rd., WINSTON-SALEM, NC 27103, 919-748-4131
 For further information, contact: Jan D. Weiner, Gary M. Bruell, 215-661-6681
 FACT SHEET ON BENIGN PROSTATE ENLARGEMENT
 (Benign prostatic hyperplasia)
 Benign prostate enlargement in the United States
 -- May be associated with some urinary symptoms in about 10 million men in U.S. over age 50
 -- Leads to 1.7 million doctor office visits a year
 -- Results in some 400,000 surgeries a year at estimated cost of $3 billion
 The normal prostate
 -- Walnut-shaped gland located just below the bladder; surrounds first part of the urinary tube (urethra)
 -- Contributes to production of seminal fluid
 The disease
 -- Noncancerous enlargement of the prostate
 -- Enlarging gland gradually compresses urinary tube; flow of urine obstructed and decreased; bladder unable to empty completely; holds residual urine
 -- Cause not fully understood; believed to involve hormones and aging as well as other causes
 -- Risk factors not defined
 Symptoms and complications
 -- Symptoms variable (gland size does not correlate with degree of urinary obstruction and severity of symptoms)
 -- Symptoms that can result from an obstructing prostate: weak stream; hesitancy in starting urination; urinary leaking or dribbling; sensation of incomplete bladder emptying; occasional urinary retention; frequent or urgent need to urinate
 -- At age 55, about 25 percent of men will notice a decrease in force of their urinary stream; this increases to about 50 percent at age 75
 -- Complications (small percentage of patients): urinary tract infections; inability to urinate at all; gradual bladder or kidney damage
 Diagnosis
 -- Initial diagnosis based on age, medical history (symptoms) and digital rectal exam
 -- Urinalysis to detect blood in the urine; check for infection in the urinary tract or prostate
 -- Depending on symptoms, physical exam and physician's assessment, additional tests may be performed:
 Blood level of Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA), marker for prostate size or activity
 Other studies may include: measurement of urinary flow rate; blood tests to help detect kidney damage; measurement of amount of urine remaining in the bladder after voiding; ultrasonography of the urinary tract; cystos-copy (inspection of prostate and bladder through urethra)
 Who should be treated
 -- According to The Prostate Health Council, an official educational council of the American Foundation for Urologic Disease, benign prostate enlargement should be treated only if:
 Symptoms are severe enough to be bothersome
 Function of the urinary tract is seriously affected
 -- An enlarged prostate alone is not enough reason to consider treatment
 Surgical options
 -- TURP (transurethral resection of prostate): no external incision involved (tissue removed through urethra)
 -- TUIP (transurethral incision of the prostate): no external incision involved; performed with equipment similar to TURP, but more limited procedure; cuts made in prostate and possibly the bladder neck to widen urinary passage
 -- Open surgery to remove prostate tissue via abdominal incision or perineal incision
 -- Potential negative consequences of surgery include: retrograde ejaculation (semen flows back into bladder during ejaculation instead of exiting via the penis); rarely, urinary incontinence
 Medical treatment
 5-alpha reductase inhibitors
 -- Inhibit enzyme (5-alpha reductase) that converts male sex hormone testosterone into dihydrotestosterone (DHT), a chemical responsible for prostate growth
 -- Shrink enlarged prostates
 Alpha-adrenergic blockers (currently under investigation)
 -- Block alpha adrenergic receptors in prostate and bladder neck
 -- Relax smooth muscle tissue in prostate and bladder neck
 Other newly emerging treatments
 -- Balloon dilation (catheter with small balloon inserted in the urethra to widen the urinary passage when inflated)
 -- Urethral coil or stent (coil inserted into the part of the urethra that passes through the prostate to keep the urinary passage open); only approved in Europe
 -- Newer nonsurgical treatments (hyperthermia, transurethral ultrasonic-guided laser prostatectomy) have been developed, but further research is needed; controlled long-term studies have not yet been completed.
 /delval/
 -0- 6/22/92 AA PH011
 /CONTACT: Jan D. Weiner or Gary M. Bruell, 215-661-6681, both of Merck & Co. Inc./
 /SECOND ADD -- MERCK'S PROSCAR -- TO FOLLOW/
 (MRK) CO: Merck & Co. Inc. ST: Pennsylvania IN: MTC SU: PDT


JS-CC -- PH011A -- 2349 06/22/92 11:33 EDT
COPYRIGHT 1992 PR Newswire Association LLC
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1992 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Jun 22, 1992
Words:1163
Previous Article:1992 BEST'S RATINGS ASSIGNED TO 380 COMPANIES INCLUDING 23 LARGE INSURERS
Next Article:BEST RATINGS
Topics:


Related Articles
FDA COMMITTEE FAVORABLY REVIEWS MERCK PROSTATE DRUG
MERCK INTRODUCING NEW DRUG FOR SYMPTOMATIC BENIGN PROSTATE ENLARGEMENT
PROSCAR, NEW DRUG FOR SYMPTOMATIC BENIGN PROSTATE ENLARGEMENT, INTRODUCED AT NATIONAL SATELLITE NEWS CONFERENCE TODAY, 1 P.M.
/SECOND ADD -- PH011 -- MERCK'S PROSCAR/
/THIRD ADD -- PH011 -- MERCK'S PROSCAR/
PROSCAR(R) NOW AVAILABLE IN U.S. PHARMACIES; NEW DRUG TREATS COMMON PROSTATE PROBLEM IN OLDER MEN
ABBOTT, MERCK AND VA TO FUND COOPERATIVE STUDY FOR THE TREATMENT OF BPH
MERCK'S PROSCAR BEING STUDIED IN VETERAN'S AFFAIRS TREATMENT TRIAL FOR SYMPTOMATIC BENIGN PROSTATE ENLARGEMENT
Proscar Reduced Surgery and Urinary Retention in Study of Men With Benign Prostate Enlargement
FDA Clears Merck's Proscar to Reduce Need for Prostate Surgery and Risk Of Urinary Retention in Men Suffering from Enlarged Prostates

Terms of use | Copyright © 2016 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters