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FINALLY, THE INFURIATING GARBLED BABBLE OF AIRPORT-TRAIN ANNOUNCEMENTS CAN BE MADE CLEAR AND INTELLIGIBLE

FINALLY, THE INFURIATING GARBLED BABBLE OF AIRPORT-TRAIN ANNOUNCEMENTS
 CAN BE MADE CLEAR AND INTELLIGIBLE
 NEW YORK, Aug. 17 /PRNewswire/ -- Most of us have been infuriated by the noisy, garbled babble of public announcements, such as the one that made Bill Nelson miss his plane several years ago.
 Unlike the rest of us, Nelson did something about it.
 Right there in the airport lounge of New York's J. F. Kennedy Airport, while killing time until he could get another flight to Salt Lake City, Nelson, using his background in computer science, began calculating a way to make such announcements understandable.
 Its been over three years since then and a half a million dollars spent. During this development period many specialized "rocket scientists" became involved, including computer scientists and audiologists at Brigham Young University and the University of Utah. Finally, a way was found to do precisely what Nelson had originally set out to do. As a result, the developer, Digital Hearing Inc. (New York), of which Nelson is a senior manager, recently obtained patents for the technology.
 "Now," says Nelson, "we can digitally manipulate sound so well that even in the noisiest environments, precise, intelligible speech can be achieved."
 "All that's left for a manufacturer or product entrepreneur, to buy a license and do it," Nelson says, which is why he's telling his story.
 "It won't stop there," Nelson says. "The same digital technology can be used to do much, much more."
 First, he says, it can be a boon to a raft of other applications in the consumer and electronic fields that act upon voice commands or sound signals.
 The technology literally adds a pair of "digital ears" to the listener, and makes all the difference between getting "a piece of pie" instead of "a pizza pie," when a waitress takes your order in a noisy restaurant.
 "Worse still," says Nelson, "are the errors made when voice commands are directed to computers and appliances which are not correctly interpreted because of background noise or multiple speech sources - speech babble.
 The technology also boasts advanced noise cancellation capabilities that control sounds emitted from any source; from factory and farm machinery to auto and plane engines, even household or office appliances.
 "You name it," says Nelson, "and we're able to block out noise without affecting the ability to hear speech or other sound signals at the same time. Hear the news even while the vacuum cleaner is going at full blast!"
 -0- 8/17/92
 /NOTE TO EDITORS: Interviews available/
 /CONTACT: Hal Antin, 212-943-3140, for Digital Hearing/ CO: Digital Hearing, Inc. ST: New York IN: SU:


AH-TM -- NYFNS2 -- 0320 08/17/92 07:31 EDT
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Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Aug 17, 1992
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