Printer Friendly

FEDS AND STATE OF NEW JERSEY TO RECOVER $52 MILLION FOR CLEANUP COSTS AT LIPARI LANDFILL SUPERFUND SITE IN GLOUCESTER COUNTY

 NEW YORK, Jan. 19 /PRNewswire/ -- Constantine Sidamon-Eristoff, regional administrator of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced that the United States and the State of New Jersey have reached a partial settlement with the three major contributors of hazardous wastes at the Lipari Landfill Superfund site in Gloucester County, N.J. that will mean the recovery of approximately $52 million in cleanup costs incurred or to be incurred by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the State of New Jersey at the site. The settlement is embodied in a consent decree which was lodged today by U.S. Attorney Michael Chertoff, on behalf of EPA, in Federal District Court in Camden, N.J. This follows an earlier settlement with 10 parties who were smaller contributors of hazardous waste at the site. Under the terms of the earlier settlement the two governments recovered approximately $3 million in costs.
 Mr. Sidamon-Eristoff called the settlement with hazardous waste generator Rohm & Haas, Inc., transporter Manor Care and generator/transporter Owens-Illinois, Inc., a significant milestone and an example of the success of EPA's Superfund enforcement program. "The value of this settlement represents most of the funds the federal government expects to spend on the portion of the cleanup covered by the settlement and includes the State of New Jersey's financial contribution of 10 percent of the clean up costs. Since 1981, in New York and New Jersey alone, EPA has been able to get responsible parties to pay more than $1 billion for cleanup work and in settlements for past costs incurred by the government at Superfund sites."
 Lipari Landfill is still listed as the number one site on EPA's National Priorities List (NPL) for hazardous waste site cleanups. Superfund is the federal program to address abandoned hazardous waste sites.
 Acting Assistant Attorney General for the U.S. Department of Justice's Environment and Natural Resources Division Vicki O'Meara, noted the importance of today's settlement: "This settlement represents a very important step toward overall cleanup of the number one site on the NPL and demonstrates the United States' commitment to enforcing aggressively our environmental laws. Today's action sends an important signal to generators of hazardous waste that they will be held responsible for the harm they do to our environment."
 "The Lipari Landfill settlement brings to a close the initial phase of litigation involving the clean up of this site," according to U.S. Attorney Michael Chertoff. "Such a settlement could not have occurred without the cooperation among the federal and state government agencies charged with the enforcement of Superfund."
 New Jersey Attorney General Robert J. Del Tufo also commented on the settlement, "This settlement reflects our continuing effort to address sites that require remediation, and to aggressively pursue all responsible parties. We are working closely with EPA and with our neighbor states in litigating cases in which New Jersey taxpayers have unjustly been made to bear the financial burden of cleaning up after environmental polluters. Settling these types of cases saves all parties involved -- government, taxpayers and defendants alike -- the expense of engaging in costly and time consuming litigation."
 "Today's announcement represents another example of the successes in the Superfund program," said New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection and Energy Commissioner Scott Weiner. "What has been accomplished at the Lipari landfill demonstrates how federal and state government working together can achieve results that mitigate the tragic legacy of abandoned hazardous waste sites and restore the environment to good health." The long-term environmental problems associated with this site are being addressed in remedial phases focusing on source control, cleanup of groundwater and leachate, and off-site cleanup activities.
 The first phase of the cleanup of the site is done and construction of the second phase is complete. The third and final phase is under design. In EPA actions during 1983-1984 (the first phase), the 15-acre site was surrounded by an underground slurry cut-off wall and covered with a membrane cap to confine the contamination. In the second phase of the cleanup, EPA began construction of collection and treatment systems for contamination at the site early in 1990 at a contract cost of $15.8 million. The work was completed last year. The third phase will address contaminations remaining in creeks and marshes surrounding the landfill.
 "With this payment, the parties will resolve their liabilities for the first and second phases of the overall remedy at the site, and portions of the future work in the third phase of the cleanup, which should start later this year," Mr. Sidamon-Eristoff explained.
 Past Actions
 In 1982, EPA selected a remedy to stop the pollutants from migrating from the landfill by constructing a landfill containment system made up of an underground slurry cut-off wall around the area and a synthetic membrane landfill cover. EPA completed the wall and covered the landfill in 1984.
 In 1985, EPA selected a remedy to clean up the groundwater and leachate from the landfill including: (1) installing extraction and injection wells in the landfill containment system to flush the system and pump the contaminated groundwater and leachate; (2) treating the pumped water on site and then discharging it to a local sewage treatment plant; (3) installing monitoring wells downhill from the site; and (4) continuing groundwater treatment to meet applicable standards.
 EPA installed the landfill injection and extraction wells and completed construction of the treatment plant in January 1992. Shakedown operations of the wells and treatment plant are underway. Once the plant is fully operational, the groundwater will be flushed to remove contaminants for a period of approximately seven years.
 In 1988, EPA selected a remedy to clean up the off-site contamination including: (1) collecting the groundwater and leachate in the aquifers outside the containment system, treating it, and discharging the treated water into the county sewer lines; (2) excavating the contaminated soils in Chestnut Branch Marsh and dredging and dewatering the contaminated sediments in Alcyon Lake, Chestnut Branch, and Rabbit Run and removing the pollutants by heating the soil and sediment and trapping the vapors; (3) instituting temporary measures, if necessary, to reduce vapors from the leachate seepage in areas in Chestnut Branch Marsh; and (4) monitoring the off-site areas to ensure that the on-site cleanup is effective. EPA is designing the technical specifications to clean up the marsh, aquifers, streams, and lake. Once the design phase is completed and a remedial action contractor is procured, the cleanup activities will begin later in 1993.
 Site Description
 The 15-acre Lipari Landfill is an inactive landfill that, between 1958 and 1971, accepted household waste, liquid and semi-solid chemical wastes, and other industrial materials. These wastes were disposed of in trenches originally excavated for sand and gravel. Approximately 3,000,000 gallons of liquid wastes and about 12,000 cubic yards of solid wastes were disposed of at the site. Some of the wastes included solvents, paints and thinners, formaldehyde, dust collector residues, resins, and solid press cakes from the industrial production of paints and solvents. Prior to the closing of the landfill in 1971 by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, at least one explosion and two fires were reported at the site. Contaminants have seeped into the aquifers underneath the site and have leached into nearby marshlands, Chestnut Branch Stream, Rabbit Run Stream, and Alcyon Lake. The lake has been closed to recreational use. Approximately 11,000 people depend on groundwater for drinking water supplies within 3 miles of the site. Fruit orchards are adjacent to the site. Chestnut Branch is a tributary to the Delaware River.
 -0- 1/19/93
 /CONTACT: Mary Breitenbach of United States Environmental Protection Agency, 212-264-2515/


CO: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency ST: New Jersey IN: SU:

SM-WB -- NY088 -- 6588 01/19/93 17:26 EST
COPYRIGHT 1993 PR Newswire Association LLC
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1993 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Jan 19, 1993
Words:1289
Previous Article:CABOT OIL & GAS WILL SPEND $50.6 MILLION IN 1993
Next Article:CMI CORPORATION CLOSES UNSECURED LENDING TRANSACTIONS WITH RECOVERY EQUITY INVESTORS, L.P.


Related Articles
GM TO CONDUCT FIRST-PHASE CLEANUP OF SUPERFUND SITE IN MASSENA, N.Y.
Superfund litigation threatens public interest.
Minnesota considers revamping environmental laws.
EPA SUES SEVEN COMPANIES FOR CLEANUP COSTS AT SUPERFUND SITE IN LOGAN TOWNSHIP, NEW JERSEY
EPA ANNOUNCES DELETION OF FLORIDA SUPERFUND SITE FROM NATIONAL LIST OF HAZARDOUS WASTE SITES
EPA ORDERS COMPANIES AT WARWICK LANDFILL SUPERFUND SITE TO PERFORM CLEANUP WORK
ROHM & HAAS AGREES TO PERFORM OFF-SITE CLEANUP AT LIPARI LANDFILL SUPERFUND SITE IN MANTUA TOWNSHIP, NEW JERSEY
ROHM AND HAAS TO TAKE CHARGES OF $70 MILLION AGAINST 1993 EARNINGS
CONTRACTOR SELECTED AND APPROVED FOR LIPARI CLEANUP
Toxic landfill may cause babies to be tiny.

Terms of use | Copyright © 2017 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters